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Full text of "White River : record of decision and approved resource management plan"

BLM LIBRARY 



88065651 



WHITE RIVER 

RECORD OF DECISION AND 
APPROVED RESOURCE MANAGEMENT 

PLAN 







U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT 

WHITE RIVER RESOURCE AREA COLORADO 

JULY 1997 



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BLDQ50.ST-150; 
EMVEB FEDERAl 

' P.O. BOX 250- 






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United States Department of the Interior 

Bureau of Land Management \i^ / 



RECORD OF DECISION AND 
APPROVED WHITE RIVER 
RESOURCE AREA 
RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PLAN 



Craig District 

White River Resource Area 

Meeker, Colorado 



/ fadj^l C^r/^ 



State Director 
Colorado State Off i/ce 




RECORD OF DECISION 

WHITE RIVER RESOURCE AREA 
RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PLAN 



INTRODUCTION 

This document records the 
decisions reached by the Bureau of 
Land Management (BLM) for managing 
1,455,900 of BLM surface estate 
and 365,000 acres of split mineral 
estate within the White River 
Resource Area. 

ALTERNATIVES 

At the beginning of the planning 
process, issues were identified by 
the public and the BLM that needed 
to be resolved in the plan. The 
most critical issues revolved 
around oil and gas leasing 
stipulations, wild horse 
management areas, motorized 
vehicle travel, and vegetation 
management, including riparian, 
noxious /problem weeds, plant 
communities, and Threatened and 
Endangered plant species. 

These, and other issues were 
incorporated into four 
alternatives including Alternative 
A-Existing Management (No Action 
Alternative) , Alternative B- 
Enhanced Use, Alternative C- 
Enhanced Natural Values , and 
Alternative D- Preferred 
Alternative. These alternatives 
were displayed for public review 
and comment in the Draft RMP/EIS 
issued in November 1994. The 
Proposed Resource Management Plan 
published in May 19 96, was a 
refinement of Alternative D based 
on public comments and internal 
BLM review. The decisions 
approved in this document 
represent the combination of 
management options that best 
resolve the issues identified 



during the planning process. This 
is considered to be the 
environmentally preferable 
alternative. 

MANAGEMENT CONSIDERATIONS 

There were many considerations 
that pointed toward selection of 
the plan that is now being 
approved. First there is the need 
to consolidate and update 
management direction for the White 
River Resource Area. This plan 
incorporates or supersedes 
decisions in nine existing 
planning documents. It updates 
oil and gas lease management to be 
consistent with adjacent BLM 
resource areas. New program 
issues including the 
identification of Black footed 
ferret reintroduction areas, 
ecosystem management concepts, and 
standards for public land health 
are addressed in the plan. The 
resulting land use plan represents 
a mix of actions that best 
resolves the issues and management 
concerns that were raised during 
preparation of the plan. Resource 
use is managed under the multiple 
use concept by integrating 
ecological, economic, and social 
principles in a manner that 
safeguards the long term 
sustainability , diversity, and 
productivity of the land. 

MITIGATION 

The approved plan has been 
designed to avoid or minimize 
environmental harm where 
practicable. In particular, the 
Surface Stipulations in Appendix 
A and Conditions of Approval in 



Appendix B, when applied, serve 
this end. 

MONITORING 

Decisions in the approved plan 
will be implemented over a period 
of years and must be tied to the 
BLM budget process . A general 
implementation schedule has been 
added to the plan to provide for 
the systematic accomplishment of 
the decisions. This general 
schedule will require further 
elaboration and continuous 
updating as implementation 
progresses and conditions change. 
An annual assessment of 
implementation progress will be 
made for use in budget 
preparation. Periodically, but 
not to exceed five year intervals, 
the Area Manager shall update the 
plan by evaluating: 1) progress in 
implementing plan decisions; 2) 
the effectiveness of plan 
decisions in achieving desired 
outcomes; and 3) identifying the 
need for plan amendments . The 
plan update shall include a 



description 



implementation 



progress, maintenance, and 
amendment changes. These plan 
updates will be designed to inform 
the public and facilitate their 
involvement in implementing the 
plan. 

PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT 

The views of the public have been 
sought throughout this planning 
and decision making process. 
Public participation in the 
process was summarized in Chapter 
5, page 5-1 of the PRMP/FEI3. 

PROTESTS 

The BLM received 11 protest 
letters to the plan. These 
protests involved concern about 
wild horse management, wilderness 
study area and wild and scenic 
river designations, oil and gas 
leasing stipulations, cff highway 
vehicle management, Black footed 



ferret reintroductions and the 
socio-economic impacts of the PRMP 
decisions. All protests were 
responded to by the Director and 
the issues were resolved without 
significant change to the 
Proposed Resource Management Plan. 

CONSISTENCY 

This plan is consistent with the 
plans, programs, and policies of 
other federal, state, and local 
governments . 



PUBLIC AVAILABILITY 
THIS DOCUMENT 



OF 



Additional copies of the White 
River Resource Management Plan are 
available upon request from the 
White River Resource Area, PO Box 
928 (73544 Highway 64), Meeker, 
Colorado 81641, phone (97C) 878- 
3601. 

DECISION 

It is my decision to approve the 
management decisions described in 
Chapter 2 of this document, as the 
resource management plan (RMP) for 
the White River Resource Area. 
The RMP was prepared in 
conformance with regulations (43 
CFR 1600) implementing the Federal 
Land Policy and Management Act of 
1976. An environmental impact 
statement (EIS) for this plan was 
prepared in conformance with the 
National Environmental Policy Act 
of 1969. The management decisions 
approved here are the same as 
those in the Proposed Resource 
Management Plan and Final 
Environmental Impact Statement 
(PRMP/FEIS) published in May 1996. 

Robert Abbey f 

Acting Colorado State Director 

7-/- ?7 

Date 




Piceance twinpod 
(Physaria obcordata) 

Driwtns :3ur:«s'/ Csioradrc Na;:v» ?lar.z scc:«ty 



Federal Listed Threatened Species 



Table of Contents 

WHITE RIVER RESOURCE AREA 
APPROVED RESOURCE MANAGEMENT 

PLAN 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

CHAPTER 1, PURPOSE AND NEED 

Page 

Introduction 1-1 

Purpose and Need 1 _ 1 

Location of the Planning Area 1 _1 

Map 1-1. White River Resource Area Location and Land Status 

Implementation 1-1 

Mitigation, Monitoring, and Evaluation 1-2 

Changing the Plan 1~* 

Maintaining the Plan 1"** 

Protests of the Proposed Management Plan 1-3 

Integrated Activity Plan 1"3 

Relationship to Other Plans 1~3 

Map 1-2 . Integrated Activity Plan Areas by Priority 

Map 1-3 . Geographic Reference Areas 

CHAPTER 2, RESOURCE MANAGEMENT DECISIONS 

Introduction 2-1 

Standards for Public Land Health 2-1 

Resource Use Decisions 2-1 

Air Quality Management 2-1 

Soils Management 2-2 

Hydrology Management 

Surface Water 2-2 

Ground water 2-3 

Water Rights 2-3 

Water Depletions 2-4 

Minerals Management 2-5 

Oil and Gas 2-5 

Oil Shale • 2-5 

Sodium 2-6 

Coal • 2-7 

Mineral Materials 2-8 

Locatable Minerals 2 "8 

Hazardous Materials Management 2-9 

Vegetation Management 2-10 

Plant Communities 2-10 

Noxious and Problem Weeds 2-13 

Riparian Areas 1~}t 

Threatened and/or Endangered Plant Species 2-17 

Sensitive Plants and Remnant Vegetation Associations 2-18 



Table of Contents 

Forestry Management ' 2 -19 

Timber lands ........... • • • • • 3-19 

Woodlands 2-?n 

Livestock Grazing Management '' 2 -2? 

Wild Horse Management " 1--)% 

Wildlife Habitat Management. . % ,2 

Big Game Habitat -)--)\ 

Raptor Habitat 2-29 

Grouse Habitat 2-31 

Fisheries Habitat '.'..".'. 2-3 3 

Special Status Species ........ . . ......... ','. 2-34 

Wilderness Management 2-37 

Wild and Scenic Rivers Management 2-38 

Visual Resources Management ' ' 2-38 

Areas of Critical Environmental Concern .' .' 2-3 9 

Recreation Management. ' ' 2-40 

Motorized Vehicle Travel Management! 2-44 

Cultural Resources Management „ •■■■■•• 2 _ 4g 

Paleontological Resources Management. 2-48 

Lands and Realty Management '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 2-4 9 

Land Use Authorizations. .'.'.'.'.'.'.' ' ' 2-49 

Land Tenure Adjustment 2-52 

Access Management 2-53 

Withdrawals ........... 2-53 

Water Power and Reservoirs ....'.'.'.'.'.". °. '.'.'.".". '. 2-54 

Fire Management 2-54 

General Implementation Schedule'. ...... '. '. '. '. \ \ \ \ \ ." ." .' ' .' .' .' .' .' .' .' .' ," .' .' .' ,* ,' ." 2-56 

Resource Management Maps 

Map 2-1. Fragile Watersheds 

Map 2-2. No Lease Areas 

Map 2-3. No Surface Occupancy Stipulation Areas 

Map 2-4. Timing Limitation Stipulation Areas 

Map 2-5. Controlled Surface Use Stipulation Areas 

Map 2-6. Lands Available for Oil Shale Leasing 

Map 2-7. Lands Available for Sodium Leasing 

Map 2-8. Weed Free Zones 

Map 2-9. Grazing Allotment Categorization 

Map 2-10. Wild Horse Herd Management Area and Herd Areas 

Map 2-11. Mule Deer Winter Ranges 

Map 2-12. Elk Winter Ranges 

Map 2-13. Pronghorn Antelope Seasonal Ranges 

Map 2-14. Mule Deer Summer Ranges 

Map 2-15. Elk Summer Ranges 

Map 2-16. Sage Grouse Seasonal Ranges 

Map 2-17. Prairie Dog Distribution and Potential Black 

Footed Ferret Reintroduction Areas 

Map 2-18. Wilderness Study Areas 

Map 2-19. Visual Resource Management Classifications 

Map 2-20. Areas of Critical Environmental Concern (ACEC) 

Map 2-21. Recreation Opportunity Spectrum (Blue Mountain 

and White River Geographic Reference Areas) 

Map 2-22. Off Highway Vehicle Designations 



Table of Contents 

Map 2-23A. ACEC Designated Roads and Trails 

(Raven Ridge and Coal Oil Rim) 
Map 2-23B. ACEC Designated Roads and Trails (Upper 

and Lower Greasewood and Yanks Gulch) 
Map 2-23C. ACEC Designated Roads and Trails (Black Gulch) 
Map 2-23D. ACEC Designated Roads and Trails (Duck 

Creek, Ryan Gulch and Dudley Bluffs) 
Map 2-23E. ACEC Designated Roads and Trails 

(Coal Draw and South Cathedral Bluffs) 
Map 2-23F. ACEC Designated Roads and Trails (Deer Gulch) 
Map 2-24. Indian Valley/Deep Channel Designated Roads 

and Trails 
Map 2-25. Canyon Pintado NHD Designated Roads and Trails 
Map 2-26. Major Utility Corridors 
Map 2-27. Areas Needing Enhanced Access 
Map 2-28. Potential Prescribed Natural Fire Areas 

APPENDIXES 

Appendix A: Surface Stipulations A-l 

No Surface Occupancy Table A-l ' ' a-2 

Controlled Surface Use Table A-2 '.[ a-8 

Timing Limitation Table A-3 '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.' A-13 

Lease Notice Table A-4 '.'.['. A-22 

Appendix B: Conditions of Approval B-l 

All Surface Disturbing Activities B-l 

Road Construction and Maintenance B-2 

Tanks and Pits ][ B-5 

Oil and Gas ' b-6 

Geophysical Exploration B-8 

Coal Exploration B-8 

Forest Stand Treatments b-9 

Pipeline and Powerline Construction B-9 

Fence Location, Design, and Construction B-10 

Archaeological and Paleontological Sites B-ll 

Wildfire Suppression B-12 

Water Developments B-13 

Livestock Grazing B-13 

Pesticide and Herbicide Application B-14 

Prescribed Burning B-14 

Mechanical Treatments B-15 

Hazardous Substances B-16 

Wildlife Habitat B-16 

Noxious Weeds B- 17 

Reclamation B-17 

Standard Seed Mixes Table B-l B-19 

Native Seed Mixes Table B-2 B-21 

Appendix C: Standards and Guidelines C-l 

Standard 1 . Upland Soils C-l 

Standard 2 . Riparian System C-l 

Standard 3 . Healthy Desirable Species C-2 

Standard 4 . Special Status Plants and Animals C-2 



Chapter 1 



CHAPTER 1 
PURPOSE AND NEED 



INTRODUCTION 

This Resource Management Plan 
outlines and guides future 
management actions within the 
White River Resource Area. Except 
for prior existing rights, 
activities or uses must conform to 
the decisions and conditions 
described in this document. This 
plan was prepared in conformance 
with the Federal Land Policy and 
Management Act of 1976 and the 
National Environmental Policy Act 
of 1969. 

This document does not contain 
information on the affected 
environment or the environmental 
consequences of the decisions. 
That information and analysis is 
presented in the draft and final 
environmental impact statements 
published in October 1994 and May 
1996, respectively. Copies of 
those documents may be obtained by 
contacting the White River 
Resource Area Office. 

PURPOSE AND NEED 

Management of the resource area 
was guided by the White River 
Management Framework Plan 
completed in 1975 and the Piceance 
Basin Resource Management Plan 
that was completed in 1987. The 
197 5 document has been amended 
several times, including the Coal 
Amendment and the livestock 
grazing Rangeland Program 
Summaries completed in 1981. 

The purpose of this Resource 
Management Plan is to update and 
integrate the land use planning 
decisions contained in the above 



documents into one comprehensive 
land use plan. 

LOCATION OF THE PLANNING 
AREA 

The White River Resource Area is 
located in northwest Colorado and 
incorporates parts of Rio Blanco, 
Moffat, and Garfield Counties and 
includes the towns of Meeker, 
Rangely, and Dinosaur (see Map 1- 
1) . The Resource Area boundary 
includes approximately 2,67 5,3 60 
acres of BLM, national forest, 
national park, Department of 
Energy, state, and privately owned 
and administered lands. 

The BLM administers approximately 
1,455,900 surface acres, including 
minerals, and 365,000 acres of 
mineral estate underlying state 
and privately owned surface 
estate. 

IMPLEMENTATION 

This plan does not repeal ■ valid 
existing rights on public lands. 
A valid existing right is a claim 
or authorization that takes 
precedence over the decisions 
developed in this plan. However, 
such authorizations will be 
reviewed and brought into 
conformance with the plan prior to 
amendment, renewal, or reissuance 
of the authorization. 

All future resource authorizations 
and actions will conform to, or 
not conflict with, the decisions 
developed in the -■•• Resource 
Management Plan. Subject to the 
valid existing rights mentioned 
above, all existing operations and 



1-1 



WHITE RIVER RESOURCE AREA 

MAP 1-1 




BLM 

PRIVATE 

U.S. FOREST SERVICE 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 

U.S. DEPT. OF ENERGY 

COLO. DIV. OF WILDLIFE 
STATE LANDS 



COLORADO VICINITY MAP 




Purpose and Need 



activities authorized under 
permits, contracts, cooperative 
agreements or other authorization 
for use or occupancy will be 
modified, as necessary, to conform 
with this plan within a reasonable 
timeframe . 

Overall priorities for 
implementation of decisions in the 
RMP will be based on numerous 
criteria and considerations, 
including: 1) decisions made in 
previous activity planning 
documents; 2) current and 
projected resource needs and 
demands ; and 3 ) the BLM ' s 
management direction, emphasis, 
and funding. 

Decisions in the document will be 
implemented over a period of 
years. Implementation procedures 
are addressed in Chapter 2 , 
following the description of the 
management action. The schedule 
of implementation will vary 
depending on funding and other 
considerations. In some cases 
more detailed and site specific 
planning and environmental 
analysis may be required before an 
action can be taken. Priorities 
will be established for the 
decisions that cannot be 
implemented immediately. These 
priorities will guide the order of 
implementation and link the 
planned action to the budget 
process. An implementation 
schedule is presented in Chapter 
2, on Page 2-54 . 

MITIGATION, MONITORING, 
AND EVALUATION 

The RMP developed measures for 
mitigating the impacts of 
management actions to acceptable 
levels. These measures are the 
Stipulations described in Appendix 
A and the Conditions of Approval 
listed in Appendix B. The 



stipulations will be attached to 
new use authorizations and mineral 
leases. Conditions of approval 
will be attached, as appropriate, 
to help mitigate the site specific 
impacts of an authorization. 
These mitigating measures may be 
supplemented with additional 
requirements or replaced by 
alternative measures that will 
accomplish the same result as well 
or better than the original. 

The affects of implementing the 
decisions in the RMP will be 
monitored and evaluated to assure 
that the desired results are being 
achieved. Monitoring will help 
determine whether actions are 
consistent with current policy and 
provide feedback as to whether the 
original assumptions were 
correctly applied and impacts 
correctly predicted. It will also 
provide data as to the adequacy of 
the mitigative measures 
(stipulations and conditions of 
approval). Monitoring will help 
establish long term use and 
resource condition trends. 

CHANGING THE PLAN 

This plan may be changed, should 
conditions warrant, through the 
amendment process. The results of 
monitoring, evaluation of new 
data, or policy changes and 
changing public needs could 
provide the impetus for an 
amendment. Generally, an 
amendment is issue specific, and 
has a public input process that is 
similar to the RMP. 

If the plan becomes outdated or 
otherwise obsolete, a revised or 
new plan will be prepared. 

MAINTAINING THE PLAN 

This plan will be maintained as 
necessary to reflect changes in 



1-2 



Chapter 1 



data. Maintenance is limited to 
refining or further clarifying a 
plan decision and cannot expand 
the scope nor change the terms or 
conditions of resource use. All 
maintenance changes will be 
documented in supporting records 
that will be available for public 
review in the White River Resource 
Area Office. Public involvement 
is not required to perform plan 
maintenance . 

PROTESTS 

The BLM received 11 protest 
letters to the Proposed Resource 
Management Plan. These protests 
involved concerns about Off 
Highway Vehicle road and trail 
designations, wild horse Herd 
Management Areas, socio-economic 
impact analysis, oil and gas lease 
stipulations, wilderness 
considerations, and Black footed 
ferret reintroduction. All 
protests were responded to and 
resolved without making 
significant changes to the 
Proposed Resource Management Plan. 



INTEGRATED 
PLANNING 



ACTIVITY 



Additional planning will be needed 
to fully implement many of the 
management actions in the plan. 
Because of budget reductions it is 
anticipated that most activity 
planning will be conducted in 
partnership with other interested 
parties as opportunities arise. 
Because of the many interest 
holders and customers that will be 
invited to participate in these 
plans, they will be referred to as 



Integrated Activity Plans (IAP) . 
Map 1-2 shows the location of 
proposed IAP areas and the 
preliminary priority that has been 
assigned to each area. 



To help facilitate 
management approac 
planning effort, 
Reference Areas 
established based 
ecosystem landscapes 
planning issues, 
management decisions 
Chapter 2 reference 
areas are displayed 



an ecosystem 

h to the 

Geographic 

(GRA) were 

in part on 

and similar 

Many of the 

identified in 

GRAs. These 

on Map 1-3. 



The IAP areas may be modified and 
the priorities in which further 
planning will be initiated may be 
changed at the discretion of the 
Area Manager. 

The management decisions that may 
require further planning are 
identified in Chapter 2, in the 
Appropriate resource management 
sections . 



RELATIONSHIP 
PLANS 



TO 



OTHER 



This plan incorporates or replaces 
decisions in the following eight 
documents: 1) White River 
Management Framework Plan (MFP) , 
1975; 2) Grazing Management 
Program, 1980; 3) MFP Coal 
Amendment, 19 81; 4) Oil and Gas 
Leasing Environmental Assessment, 
1982; 5) Piceance Basin Resource 
Management Plan, 19 87; 6) NW 
Colorado Coal PRLA Environmental 
Impact Statement (EIS) , 1989; 7) 
Craig District Wilderness EIS, 
1990; 8) Craig District 
Wilderness Study Report, 19 91. 



1-3 



MAP 1-2 
INTEGRATED ACTIVITY PLAN 

AREAS 

AND 

MAP 1-3 
GEOGRAPHIC REFERENCE AREAS 




* NUMBERED ACCORDING TO PLANNING PRIORITY 



oooo< 
ooo<v 



Douglas Creek 



■ i i i 



Blue Mountain/Wolf Creek 



Square S 



V//A Yellow Creek 



o/vvy White River 



Evacuation Creek 



ffffiftfl Colorow 



Little Hills 



Crooked Wash 



>S^1 Cow Creek 




7J 



1:500000 



7.B 



15.B Mils* 



If^P 7 1 



MAP 1-3 GEOGRAPHIC REFERENCE AREAS 
ON BLM AND SPLIT ESTATE LANDS 




Blue Mountain/Moosehead 



Wolf Creek/Red Wash 
Crooked Wash/Deep Channel 
Danforth/Jensen 
Piceance 

Douglas/Cathedral 
White River 










B2 



16.4 Miles 



1:500000 



MAP 1-3 





Graham's pensteimon 
CPenstemon grahamii) 



White River pemtemon 
CPenstemon scariosus) 



Category * Candidates For Listing as Theratened/Endangered 



Chapter 2 



CHAPTER 2 
RESOURCE MANAGEMENT DECISIONS 



INTRODUCTION 

The resource decisions contained 
in this Chapter update and 
integrate several land use 
planning documents into one 
comprehensive plan. This Resource 
Management Plan (RMP) will provide 
a framework for managing and 
allocating BLM administered"' lands 
and resources for the next 20 
years . 

The decisions are the same as 
those in the Proposed Resource 
Management plan and Final 
Environmental Impact Statement 
(PRMP/EIS) that was published in 
May 1996. 

This RMP represents a mix of 
actions that, in the judgement of 
the BLM, best resolves the issues 
and management concerns that 
resulted in the preparation of the 
plan. Resource use is managed 
under the multiple use concept, by 
integrating ecological, economic, 
and social principles in a manner 
that safeguards the long term 
sustainability, diversity, and 
productivity of the land. 



STANDARDS FOR 
LAND HEALTH 



PUBLIC 



The Colorado Standards for public 
land health and guidelines for 
livestock grazing management 
(Standards and Guidelines) were 
approved by the Secretary and the 
Governor on February 3, 1997. The 
Standards and Guidelines were 
developed and will be implemented 
collaboratively with the Colorado 
Resource Advisory Councils (RACs) . 
The full text of the Standards and 



Guidelines is included in Appendix 
C of this document. Standards 
describe conditions needed to 
sustain public land health and 
relate to all uses of the public 
lands. Guidelines are livestock 
grazing management tools, methods, 
strategies, and techniques 
designed to maintain or achieve 
healthy public lands as defined by 
the standards. The Standards are 
referenced at appropriate places 
in the Resource Decision section. 
The Guidelines are referenced in 
the Livestock Grazing portion 
(Numbers 132 to 141) of Appendix 
B. 

RESOURCE DECISIONS 
AIR QUALITY 

Objective: 

BLM actions shall be implemented 
in a manner to minimize impacts to 
air quality. 

Management: 

At a minimum, BLM actions shall 
comply with all applicable 
federal, state, and local air 
quality laws, regulations and 
implementation plans. Site 
specific project plans affecting 
BLM^ and adjacent lands will be 
reviewed to assure compliance with 
the above objective. 

Implementation: 

BLM actions shall be implemented 
in a manner to minimize impacts to 
air quality. Actions include but 
are not limited to: 

1) Cooperation with the State of 
Colorado to meet the goals 
identified in the State 
Implementation Plan. 



2-1 



Resource Decisions 



2) Limiting unnecessary emission 
from existing and point or non- 
point pollution sources. 

3) Preventing significant air 
quality deterioration in selected 
areas . 

4) Potential impacts from future 
BLM actions will be assessed prior 
to implementation. 

5) Mitigating measures will be 
incorporated into project 
proposals when necessary to reduce 
potential impacts. 

SOILS 



identified in the soil related 
stipulations in Appendix A will be 
placed in a computer data base. 
The data base will be utilized by 
CSO personnel to attach special 
surface stipulations to all new 
oil and gas leases. 

Soil and Watershed treatments will 
be developed in integrated 
activity plans (IAP) or Watershed 
Activity Plans (WAP) . 

Treatments will be implemented 
that stabilize soils and 
rehabilitate watersheds that 
exhibit accelerated erosion and 
degraded soil conditions. 



Objective: 

Prevent impairment of soil 
productivity due to accelerated 
erosion and physical or chemical 
degradation resulting from surface 
use activities. Management 
actions support the goals provided 
as indicators in Standard One of 
the Standards for Public Land 
Health (See Appendix C) . 

Management : 

Analyze all proposed surface- 
disturbing activities to determine 
suitability of soils to support or 
sustain such activities. 

Identify treatments for fragile 
watershed areas that are 
contributing to water quality 
problems (accelerated erosion and 
salt contributions) in the 
Colorado River Basin. 

Implementation: 

Appropriate stipulations and 
conditions of approval listed in 
Appendix A and Appendix B, 
respectively, will be used in the 
design of all BLM- initiated 
surface-disturbing activities and 
for developing conditions for all 
new land use authorizations. 

Legal descriptions for the acreage 



HYDROLOGY 



Surface Water 

Objective: 

Maintain and improve water quality 
and quantity in order to be 
compatible with existing and 
anticipated uses, to comply with 
applicable state and federal water 
quality standards, and to meet the 
goals contained in Standard Five 
of the Standards for Public Land 
Health (See Appendix C) . 

Management : 

BLM actions and authorizations 
affecting surface waters will be 
conducted in compliance with state 
and federal law, including the 
State of Colorado's National 
Pollutant Discharge Elimination 
System (NPDES) , Anti -Degradation 
Policy, State Water Quality 
Standards, and the U.S. Army Corps 
of Engineers, Section 404 permit 
requirements, and Section 319 
(Non-point Source Management 
Program) of the Clean Water Act 
(CWA) . 

Implement the decisions developed 
in existing WAPs (see Table 2-1, 



2-2 



Chapter 2 



Appendix D) . 

The perennial streams listed in 
Table 2-2, Appendix D, do not meet 
state water quality standards. 
These streams are contributing to 
increased sediment and salinity in 
the Colorado River Basin and have 
been identified as the highest 
priority to receive special 
treatments and management 
considerations. 

Implementation: 

Design projects that will maintain 
or improve the condition of 
fragile watersheds identified as 
contributors of sediment and 
salinity to the Colorado River 
system (see Map 2-1) . 

All BLM initiated projects will be 
designed using the appropriate 
COAs listed in Appendix B. 
Applicants will also be required 
to use the COAs, or develop 
suitable substitute mitigation 
when designing their proposed 
projects. Surface stipulations 
listed in Appendix A will be 
applied to all new oil and gas 
leases and other new surface- 
disturbing activities. 

Protect and improve the condition 
of streams that: 1} lack channel 
stability; and 2) have been 
identified as not meeting state 
water quality standards (Table 2- 
2 , Appendix D) . 

Fragile watersheds will be 
identified, as needed, for new 
WAPs and incorporated, as 
appropriate, into integrated 
activity plans. 

Private landowners and other state 
and federal land management 
agencies will be encouraged to 
participate in the preparation of 
these activity plans. 



association of public land users 
will be encouraged to help 
coordinate, monitor and recommend 
mitigation measures for actions 
affecting water resources. 

Ground Water 

Objective : 

Ensure that the quantity and 
quality of aquifer system 
integrity is maintained and the 
goals contained in Standard Five 
of the Standards for Public Land 
Health are met (See Appendix C) . 

Management : 

Analyze activities that may affect 

aquifer systems. Develop and 

apply Conditions of Approval (COA) 

that will protect ground water 

integrity, quality and quantity. 

Implementation: 

Design BLM initiated projects 

using the appropriate COAs 

contained in Appendix B. 

Lessees /operators /applicants will 
be required to use the appropriate 
COAs listed in Appendix B in 
designing their proposed projects. 

Place appropriate COAs on 
groundwater usage and disposal 
actions. All activities and 
associated mitigation will be 
designed to be consistent with 
State and Federal laws. 

Water Rights 

Objective: 

Secure adequate water rights, from 
the State of Colorado, on springs, 
wells, and stream flows necessary 
to support public resource 
programs . 

Management : 

Conduct instream flow surveys on 
the streams identified in Table 2- 
3 in Appendix D. 



The 



establishment 



of 



an 



2-3 



Resource Decisions 



Compile and recommend instream 
flow quantities, to the Colorado 
Water Conservation Board (CWCB) , 
that will ensure protection of 
flow-dependent resources on BLM 
stream segments. 

Implementar.-i nn • 

File appropriate documents to 

acquire instream flow rights when 

necessary. 

Work with the CWCB to obtain a 
more senior right on high priority 
cold water fisheries that already 
have instream flows. 

All BLM-permitted projects will be 
designed in accordance with the 
appropriate BLM manual (s). The 
appropriate COAs listed in 
Appendix B will be applied as 
minimum standards. 

Depleted or dry oil and gas wells, 
that could provide an adequate 
source of water for livestock and 
wildlife, will be reviewed for 
conversion to a water well at the 
time a Notice of Intent to abandon 
the well has been submitted. 
Operators/Lessees of the 
identified wells may be liable for 
plugging-back the well to the 
desired aquifer zone. Liability 
for the well will then be assumed 
by the BLM. 

A comparison of decreed water 
rights versus cumulative water 
demand will be conducted as 
required on allotment, recreation, 
wildlife, riparian, and/or 
wilderness planned actions. In 
locations where land management 
demands exceed the decreed supply 
by more than 2 5 percent, water 
right filings will be initiated to 
bring demand in line with supply. 

Water Depletions 

Objective : 

Assure BLM administered projects 



are in compliance with the US Fish 
and Wildlife Service's 

Programmatic Biological Opinion 
for minor water depletions in the 
Colorado River Basin. 

Management : 

Calculate depletions in the upper 
Colorado River Basin resulting 
from BLM-permitted projects using 
guidelines listed in Table 2-4 of 
Appendix D. Compensation for 
depletion will consist of a one- 
time dollar amount for each 
project. 

Implementation: 

Compensation for depletions will 
be required to be made to the 
Recovery Implementation Program 
for endangered fish species in the 
upper Colorado River Basin. 

Water ^ depletions resulting from 
existing BLM approved projects 
will be exempt from compensation 
so long as progress continues to 
be made in the recovery of the 
endangered fish species. 

The NEPA document prepared for the 
proposed project will calculate 
depletions and make a 
determination as to whether formal 
Section 7 consultation will be 
required. The water depletion 
will be recorded in the resource 
area office, and a report listing 
the annual water depletions will 
be submitted annually to the BLM 
Colorado State Office. Only those 
projects for which BLM has 
discretionary decision-making 
authority will be recorded. 

BLM will initiate formal Section 
7 consultation upon or prior to: 

1) reaching or exceeding a 
cumulative water depletion total 
of 2,900 acre-feet; 

2) permitting a single project 
that could result in average 



2-4 



Chapter 2 



annual depletions exceeding 
acre-feet; and 



125 



3) authorizing projects that will 
have a significant adverse impact 
to water quality. 

Each depletion payment will be 
accompanied by a cover letter that 
identifies the project, the 
biological opinion that requires 
payment, the amount of payment 
enclosed, check number, and any 
special conditions identified in 
the biological opinion relative to 
disbursement or use of the funds. 

MINERALS 

Oil and Gas 

Objective: 

Make federal oil and gas resources 
available for leasing and 
development in a manner that 
provides reasonable protection for 
other resource values. 

Management : 

The three categories of land that 

affect the availability of BLM 

administered oil and gas estate 

are: 

1) Non-discretionary no lease 
areas (83,720 acres). The non- 
discretionary lands include the 
six Wilderness Study Areas and the 
National Park Service's Harper's 
Corner Road withdrawal (See Map 2- 
2); 

2) Areas available for leasing 
with special stipulations 
(1,552,958 acres). Appendix A 
contains a list of special 
stipulations that apply to this 
category of land. The stipulations 
include 143,083 acres of no 
surface occupancy (See Map 2-3), 
912,455 acres of timing 
limitations (See Map 2-4), and 
725,339 acres of controlled 
surface use (See Map 2-5) . 



Overlap commonly occurs between 
the acreages of these three types 
of stipulations; and 

3) Areas available for leasing 
utilizing standard lease terms 
(168,486 acres). The standard 
lease terms and conditions are 
included on the lease form and 
give the Area Manager the 
authority to modify operations at 
the time they are proposed. 

Lease notices have also been 
developed to alert prospective 
lessees of special resources that 
may be present that need 
consideration when planning 
operations. These items are 
typically limitations that already 
exist in law, regulation, or 
operational order. 

Implementation: 

Surface stipulations and lease 
notices will be entered into a 
computer data base by legal 
description. The BLM Colorado 
State Office leasing section 
personnel will then utilize the 
data base to append applicable 
stipulations and notices to new 
leases. 

The appropriate COAs contained in 
Appendix B, can be used to 
mitigate site specific impacts 
resulting from Applications for 
Permit to Drill and surface 
disturbance associated with Sundry 
Notices . 

An environmental analysis document 
will be prepared for all 
Applications for Permit to Drill 
(APD) and Sundry Notices (SN) 
proposing new surface disturbance 
or unique and unusual downhole 
workover operations. A decision 
will be made, based on the 
environmental document, whether to 
deny or approve the planned 
operation, or to exempt, modify or 
waive an existing lease 



2-5 



Resource Decisions 



stipulation. Exemptions will be 
handled administratively in 
accordance with the language 
included in the specific 
stipulation. It should be noted 
that a stipulation could be 
excepted, modified, or waived as 
stated in the stipulation, without 
preparing an RMP amendment. 

Oil Shale 

Obiectivp: 

Provide for a prudent and planned 

future leasing and development 

program for the oil shale 

resource. 

Management ; 

The oil shale management decisions 
developed in the Piceance Basin 
Resource Management Plan (March 
1985) are carried forward as 
decisions in this document (See 
Map 2-6) . A summary of those 
decisions are as follows: 

1) A total of 223,860 acres will 
be available for oil shale 
leasing; 

2) 3 9,14 acres will be available 
for open pit development; and 

3) 70,82 acres will be available 
for multimineral (oil shale, 
nahcolite, and dawsonite) leasing 
following development of 
acceptable multimineral recovery 
technology. 

At the discretion of the Secretary 
of the Interior, research scale 
lease tracts will be considered 
within lands available for oil 
shale leasing. Approval of 
research tracts will be based on 
the merits of the technology 
proposed. The Secretary of the 
Interior could also propose 
research tract development to 
further the goals of a federal 
energy policy. No definitive 
limits on research tract size will 
be set forth at this time. No 



commercial-scale operations will 
be permitted on a research tract 
lease. However, if the research 
tract technology successfully 
demonstrated an adequate reserve 
recovery, the Secretary of the 
Interior will have the discretion 
of expanding the research tract 
into a commercial mineral lease. 

All oil shale leasing and 
development will be subject to the 
carrying capacity concept 
summarized in Table 2-5, Appendix 
D. Additional NEPA analysis will 
be required prior to any lease 
offering. 

Implementation: 

The two existing prototype leases 
will be developed subject to their 
approved Detailed Development 
Plans . 

Future leasing will be dependent 
upon promulgation of regulations 
for the administration of federal 
oil shale resources. The 
regulations will provide the 
procedures for delineating and 
selecting tracts to be offered for 
competitive bid. Proposed open 
pit lease tracts will include a 
contingency plan for handling 
disposal problems associated with 
overburden and spent shale. 

Additional leasing will not be 
considered until the existing 
federal lease tracts and private 
oil shale projects are being 
diligently developed, or other 
factors, such as a national energy 
crisis materializes. 

Appropriate surface stipulations 
identified in Appendix A will be 
incorporated into the mine plan 
approval process. 



Objective: 
Facilitate 



Sodium 



the orderly 



and 



2-6 



Chapter 2 



environmentally sound development 
of sodium resources occurring on 
public lands. 

Management- ; 

The decisions developed for the 
sodium minerals in the Piceance 
Basin Resource Management Plan 
(PBRMP) are carried forward into 
this document with the following 
exceptions (See Map 2-7): 

1) The Piceance Dome area (42,42 
acres) will not be available for 
leasing; and 

2) the multimineral zone (70,820 
acres) will be reserved for 
multimineral leasing. 

A summary of the PBRMP decisions 
are as follows: 

1) Approximately 106,760 acres of 
sodium resource will be available 
for leasing; 

2) Approximately 62,760 acres 
underlain by sodium minerals will 
be subject to Timing Limitation 
Stipulations, 29,122 acres will 
have Controlled Surface Use 
Stipulations, and 5,596 acres will 
have No Surface Occupancy 
Stipulations. Acreage overlap 
occurs between stipulations; 

3) Lease offerings will be 
scheduled based on demand and 
progress in developing the 16,620 
acres currently under lease; 

4) Lands within the multimineral 
zone will be available for 
noncommercial research tracts that 
test technology for multimineral 
recovery; 

5) Research tracts could be re- 
delineated into commercial lease 
tracts upon the successful 
demonstration of multimineral 
recovery. 

Implementation : 



The existing leases will be 

managed under the terms and 

conditions of the lease and 
approved mine plans . 

Additional environmental 
documentation will precede the 
offering of new leases. Sodium 
development will be tied to the 
carrying capacity thresholds 
identified in the Piceance Basin 
RMP. 

Appropriate surface stipulations 
identified in Appendix A will be 
incorporated into the mine plan 
approval process. 

Coal 

Objective: 

Ensure that federal coal resources 

identified as acceptable for 

further consideration for coal 

leasing, are available for 

exploration, leasing and 

development. 

Management: 

The decisions pertaining to 
management of coal resources 
developed in the 19 81 Coal 
Amendment to the White River 
Resource Area Land Use Plan, are 
carried forward into this RMP. 
The Coal unsuitability criteria 
found at 43 CFR 3461 were not 
reapplied at the time this RMP was 
developed. The decisions 
developed in the 1981 Amendment 
are summarized as follows: 

1) 172,700 acres were underlain 
by recoverable coal reserves; 

2) 11,470 acres were found to be 
unsuitable for coal mining; 

3) 43,3 80 acres were determined to 
be suitable for underground mining 
only; 

4) 117,850 acres were suitable for 
both surface and underground 



2-7 



Resource Decisions 



mining. 

Decisions proposed in this 
document will affect an additional 
600 acres that will be unavailable 
for leasing based on multiple use 
resource conflicts. In addition, 
10,060 acres have been leased 
since the 19 81 Amendment was 
released to the public. This 
leaves 150,570 acres that are 
carried forward for coal leasing 
consideration. 

Implementation: 

Coal leases are issued through the 

competitive leasing process. 

Leasing is subject to the 
requirements of 43 CFR 3425 - 
Leasing on Application. Leasing 
on application involves the 
submittal of an application, 
preparation of an environmental 
analysis document, a public 
hearing on the application and 
consultation with the Governor's 
Office. 

The unsuitability criteria will 
be reapplied at the time an 
application is received. 

The stipulations identified in 
Appendix A will be incorporated 
into future mine plans through 
mitigation developed jointly 
between the lessee, BLM, and the 
State of Colorado. 

Mineral Materials 

Objective: 

Facilitate the orderly and 
environmentally sound development 
of mineral material resources. 

Management: 

Most of the surficial deposits of 
inorganic materials occurring in 
the Resource Area can be 
considered to fall under mineral 
materials management. 



Disposal actions are confined to 
applications received from 
individuals, companies, other 
federal agencies or state and 
local governments. 

Suitable sand and gravel deposits 
in the Rangely area will be 
classified as a high mineral 
material demand area. 

Implementation ; 

An inventory will be initiated and 
mineral materials discovered in 
sufficient quantity and quality 
will be given a high priority for 
disposal, subject to the 
appropriate stipulations and COAs 
contained in Appendices A and B, 
respectively. 

An environmental analysis will be 
conducted on all applications 
received for mineral material 
disposal actions. 

Withdrawals, WSAs , riparian areas, 
and NSO areas identified in the 
stipulations in Appendix A will 
not be available for disposal 
actions. These closed areas 
encompass approximately 221,500 
acres. Applications occurring in 
areas outside those closed areas 
(approximately 1,643,480 acres) 
will be subject to the appropriate 
timing limitation and controlled 
surface use stipulation contained 
in Appendix A. Appropriate COAs 
contained in Appendix B will also 
be applied to disposal approvals. 

Locatable Minerals 

Objective: 

Ensure that lands containing 
locatable minerals are available 
for location under the Mining Law 
of 1872. 

Management : 

BLM lands not withdrawn or 

segregated from mineral entry 

under the Mining Law of 1872 are 



2-8 



Chapter 2 



open to mining claim location. 

The remaining unpatented oil shale 
mining claims will be processed to 
patent or contested by the year 
2000. 

Implements ti nn : 

Several withdrawals and reserves 

exist that limit the availability 

of lands for entry. of the 

approximate 1,648,770 acres that 

could be available for location, 

997,450 acres are currently 

withdrawn or unavailable to some 

extent. The Coal withdrawal of 

1910, closes 366,570 acres to 

nonmetalliferous minerals only, as 

does 5,4 80 acres of Federal Water 

Reserves. The Oil Shale 

Withdrawal closes 625,400 acres to 

all mining claim location. If the 

three wilderness study areas that 

were recommended to be carried 

forward are designated as 

wilderness, the Wilderness Act 

will withdraw those areas from 

location. This will add 41,250 

acres to the lands that are 

unavailable for location. 

Mining claimants are required to 
notify the BLM of intentions to 
develop a mining claim through 
Plans of Development. Plans of 
Development will go through an 
environmental analysis to identify 
impacts and mitigating measures. 

All surface disturbing activity 
associated with a mining claim 
will be subject to the appropriate 
stipulations identified in 
Appendix A and the COAs contained 
in Appendix B. 

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS 

Objective : 

To protect the public lands from 
contamination by hazardous 
materials . 



Management : 

The BLM will comply with all 
federal and applicable state 
environmental laws and regulations 
pertaining to hazardous 
substances . 

Actions will be taken to prevent 
pollution from being generated, 
released, or disposed of on BLM 
lands through conditioning of use 
authorizations . 

Develop and implement strategies 
to minimize waste and prevent 
pollution on BLM lands and 
facilities . 

The use of BLM lands for disposal 
of solid wastes or the treatment, 
storage, or disposal of hazardous 
wastes will be prohibited. 

The BLM will avoid generating or 
accumulating hazardous wastes. 

Implementation: 

All responsible parties releasing 
hazardous materials will be 
sought and will be required to 
conduct site assessments and 
provide remediation. Where this 
can not be effectively 
accomplished, the costs of such 
actions will be recovered through 
appropriate civil/criminal court 
action under applicable 
environmental laws. 

Provide supervision for the 
removal and remediation of 
hazardous materials if public 
lands become contaminated. 

All releases on or affecting BLM 
lands will be required to receive 
aggressive cleanup and restoration 
actions by the releasing party. 

Location of hazardous wastes on 
BLM lands will be identified 
through ongoing inventory. High- 
risk uses of the BLM lands will 
not be authorized, and unavoidable 
risks will be managed so as to 



2-9 



Resource Decisions 



minimize threats to public health 
and safety and the environment. 

Applications for hazardous waste 
disposal will be reviewed on a 
case-by-case basis. Where the 
proposed site(s) meet all 
applicable geologic, hydrologic, 
soil-related, land tenure goals, 
and other applicable environmental 
requirements, the lands may be 
conveyed prior to use for disposal 
activities . 

BLM land users will be urged to 
include pollution prevention 
considerations into the siting, 
design, construction, and 
operation of their facilities. 
Disclosure of the use and disposal 
of hazardous materials will be 
required for all BLM actions and 
authorized uses of the BLM lands. 

Wastes will be disposed of only at 
treatment/storage/disposa 1 
facilities that are on the 
Environmental Protection Agency's 
most current list of approved 
facilities. The BLM will keep up- 
to-date inventories of applicable 
hazardous materials and will 
closely coordinate with 
appropriate local emergency 
planning committees. 

Suitable sites will be identified 
for bio-remediation activities as 
applications are received. These 
sites will likely be located near 
major oil and gas development 
areas such as the White River 
Dome, Elk Springs, and Range ly oil 
field. Sites will only be 
approved where geologic, 
hydrologic, and soil-related 
conditions are conducive to 
effective bio-remediation 
activities and where other 
resource values will not be 
adversely affected. 

VEGETATION 



Plant Communities 

Objective: 

Maintain healthy, diverse and 
sustainable rangeland and woodland 
plant communities. 

Sustain a landscape composed of 
plant community mosaics that 
represent successional stages and 
distribution patterns that are 
consistent with natural 
disturbance and regeneration 
regimes, and compatible with the 
goals identified in Standard Three 
of the Standards for Public Land 
Health (See Appendix C) . 

Management : 

BLM projects and land use approval 
actions will be designed to 
maintain a site above its 
conservation threshold (a point 
below which soil erosion 
accelerates beyond the site's 
ability to maintain natural 
productivity) . 

Any plant cover or community which 
is capable of maintaining the site 
above the conservation threshold 
while meeting other land use 
objectives will be considered a 
desired plant community (DPC) . 

Acceptable DPCs will be managed in 
an ecological status of high-seral 
or healthy mid-seral for all 
rangeland plant communities. An 
exception may be provided for 
wildlife habitat areas where 
specific cover types are needed. 
The required cover type in those 
wildlife habitat areas will be the 
DPC. The ecological status of a 
DPC in specified wildlife habitat 
areas could be lower than high 
serai. In which case, the DPC 
will be managed, at a minimum, to 
maintain an at risk rating (Table 
2-6 of Appendix D) and have a 
stable to improving trend in 
ecological status. 



2-10 



Chapter 2 



Only native plant species will be 
used for reseeding of disturbed 
areas within the Blue 
Mountain/Moosehead geographic 
reference area (GRA) , within 
wilderness study areas (wSAs) , and 
within designated areas of 
critical environmental concern 
(ACECs) . Native plant species 
will be encouraged in the 
remainder of the resource area for 
reseeding disturbed areas that are 
not threatened by establishment of 
exotic or noxious plant species. 
Naturalized plant species will be 
allowed for reseeding on "at risk" 
and "unhealthy" rangelands and 
grazable woodlands. 

An average of 50 percent of the 
annual above ground forage 
production will be reserved for 
maintenance of the plant's life 
cycle requirements, watershed 
protection, visual resource 
enhancement, and food and cover 
requirements of small game and 
nongame wildlife species. The 
remaining 50 percent of the forage 
base will be allocated among 
predominant grazing users. 

Forage allocations made in the 
Record of Decision for the 1981 
White River Resource Area Grazing 
Management Final Environmental 
Impact Statement will remain the 
same. Please see Table 2-7 in 
Appendix D for the updated 
allocation figures. 

Increased forage needs for the 
increase in big game populations 
experienced since the 1981 
allocation will be provided, as 
long as the rangelands and 
grazable woodlands upon which the 
increased allocation will be 
based, are in a "healthy" or "at 
risk" rating with all "At Risk" 
lands having an improving trend 
index . 



Implementation ; 

Ecological site inventories will 
be conducted on rangeland and 
woodland plant communities to 
determine ecological status. The 
inventory will be used to 
determine the potential plant 
communities that could be 
supported on a specific site. 

Site specific DPCs will be 
determined in integrated activity 
plans or similar activity plans 
prepared following publication of 
this approved Record of Decision. 
The goal in determining a DPC will 
be to develop a plant community 
mosaic that represents 
successional stages and 
distribution patterns consistent 
with natural disturbances and 
regeneration regimes. At a 
minimum, the selected DPC will 
have to conserve the potential of 
the site to produce vegetation on 
a sustainable basis. The DPC will 
also provide a combination of 
plant species that achieve a 
healthy system as determined by 
the rangeland health evaluation 
matrix (Table 2-6 of Appendix D) . 

Specific DPC goals for rangelands 
with grassland, saltbush, 
greasewood, and sagebrush plant 
communities are as follows: 

1) Manage present plant 
composition as DPC on all areas 
classified as: a) the PNC, high- 
seral and healthy mid-seral; b) 
sagebrush rangelands with a high- 
to mid-seral plant community 
providing suitable habitat for 
deer winter range, sage grouse, 
and antelope. 

2) Improve the present plant 
species composition on unhealthy 
or at risk rangelands to a healthy 
plant community within 10 years on 
all areas with a mid-seral and 
within 20 years on all areas with 
a low-seral plant community. 



2-11 



Resource Decisions 



Specific DPC goals for rangelands 
with mountain shrub plant 
communities are as follows: 

1) Manage present plant 
composition on all areas occupied 
by PNC, high-seral, or healthy 
mid-seral plant communities as 
DPC. 

2) Manage mature vigorous stands 
of deciduous shrubs on all blue 
grouse ranges and on all deer 
critical summer ranges as the DPC. 

3) Manage younger age stands of 
deciduous shrubs on 3 percent of 
this plant community as DPC 
through use of compatible 
treatment methods . 

4) Improve plant composition to a 
healthy plant community within 10 
years for all low-seral plant 
communities . 

Specific goals for the pinyon- 
juniper woodland plant community 
are: 

1) Manage present plant 
composition as DPC within: (a) 
ACECs, WSAs, RVAs, (b) deer winter 
ranges to meet animal cover 
requirements, (c) woodland raptor 
nesting habitat. 

2) Manage forage-producing plant 
communities on pinyon- juniper 
woodland sites that have been 
treated or burned. Retreatment of 
these areas will be subject to 
appropriate wildlife mitigation. 

3) Reduce the pinyon- juniper tree 
component where pinyon or juniper 
has dominated or is invading other 
ecological sites. 

The above goals will be considered 
in the selection of DPCs during 
activity plan development. 

Activities will be analyzed to 



determine whether the objectives 
for a particular plant community 
could be met. Activities will be 
considered if they can meet the 
plant community objective. 
Activities that can not meet the 
plant community objective will be 
denied or modified so that they 
can meet the objective. 

Vegetation in selected areas will 
be disturbed by permitted surface- 
disturbing activities or will be 
manipulated to achieve an improved 
ecological condition and/or 
improved forage production. Table 
2-8 of Appendix D lists the acres 
of vegetation types projected for 
disturbance or manipulation over 
the life of the RMP. The 
projected acreages of 
manipulations and the treatment 
method identified in the table 
are only estimates of what could 
be treated and the method of 
treatment. The actual acreage 
treated and treatment method to be 
utilized will be identified during 
development of activity plans and 
evaluated in a site specific 
environmental analysis. 
Ecological status will be 
determined by use of BLM 
ecological site inventory 
procedures. Specific objectives 
and/or DPCs for plant communities 
will be developed in integrated 
activity plans (IAP) . Priorities 
for inventory will be the same as 
those for implementation of IAPs . 

Surface disturbances or vegetation 
manipulations will be identified 
in project plans or activity plans 
and analyzed in a NEPA document. 

Use of native or non-native plant 
species in reclamation will be 
addressed in site-specific project 
analysis . 

An estimated 50 percent of the 
rangeland and wildlife 
improvements in pinyon/ juniper 



2-12 



Chapter 2 



communities and 10 percent of 
rangeland and wildlife 
improvements in mountain shrub 
communities will use recommended 
seed mixtures for revegetation. 
An estimate of 90 percent of all 
mineral development disturbances 
will be revegetated using 
recommended seed mixes (See 
Appendix B) . 

Changes in the 1981 forage 
allocations will be identified in 
allotment management plans or 
integrated activity plans. The 
average 50 percent above ground 
annual forage production available 
for allocation is based upon the 
following grazing utilization 
levels on key forage plant 
species, averaged on a grazing 
allotment basis: 

Key Species — Grass 

--40 percent averaged utilization 
for the grazing period from April 
1 to June 15 each grazing year. 

--40 to 60 percent averaged 
utilization for the grazing period 
from June 15 to September 15 each 
grazing year. 

— 60 percent averaged utilization 
for the grazing period from 
September 15 to March 31 each 
grazing year. 

Key Species — Browse 

--40 percent averaged utilization 
for the grazing period from April 
1 to September 30 each grazing 
year. 

--50 to 60 percent averaged 
utilization for the grazing period 
from October 1 to March 31 each 
grazing year. 

It is recognized that these 
utilization levels are used as 
averages to identify an 
appropriate allocation mix among 
grazing/browsing animals. Site 



specific occurrences of over 
utilization may occur and may 
create resource conflicts that can 
not be resolved by changing the 
forage allocation mix. Specific 
resource conflicts will be 
identified and corrective 
management sought through 
development of allotment 
management plans or integrated 
activity plans. 

Specific forage allocations for 
additional forage needs to support 
the proposed big game population 
increases will be evaluated in 
site specific activity plans. 

Interim increased forage needs for 
wild horses will come from current 
livestock forage allocations 
within affected herd areas. 

Noxious and Problem Weeds 

Objective: 

Manage noxious weeds so that they 
cause no further negative 
environmental, aesthetic or 
economic impact. 

Management: 

In collaboration with private 
landowners and state and local 
governments, use all available 
integrated pest management 
techniques including biological, 
mechanical and chemical methods 
for the management and control of 
noxious weeds . 

Management actions will be 
consistent with the Record of 
Decision for the Vegetation 
Treatment on BLM Lands in Thirteen 
Western States Environmental 
Impact Statement. 

A key element of management will 
include the preventative measure 
of designating weed-free zones. 

Implementation : 

Noxious and problem weeds to be 



2-13 



Resource Decisions 



managed will include, but are not 
limited to the following: 1) Leafy 
spurge (Euphorbia esula); 2) 
Whitetop (Cardaria draba) ; 3) 
Russian knapweed (Acroptilion 
repens); 4) Canada thistle 
(Cirsium arvense) ; 5) Diffuse 
knapweed (C. diffusa); 6) 
Houndstongue (Cynoglossum 
officinale); 7) Spotted knapweed 
(C. maculosa); 8) Musk thistle 
(Carduus nutans); 9) Yellow 
toadflax (Linaria vulgaris); 10) 
Tall whitetop (Lepidium 
latifolium) ; 11) Black henbane 
(Hyoscyamus niger) ; 12) Bull 
thistle (Cirsium vulgare) ; 13) 
Bluebur stickseed (Lappula 
redowski); 14) Mullen (Verbascum 
thapsus) . 

In accordance with the White River 
Resource Area Noxious Weed 
Management Plan, manage noxious 
weeds with particular emphasis on 
a coordinated, cooperative 
approach. Implement practices 
that prevent or reduce the extent 
and occurrence of noxious and 
problem weeds throughout the 
Resource Area. 

Three contiguous areas 
encompassing 497,900 acres will be 
designated as weed free zones upon 
approval of this document (See Map 
2-8) . Weed management will be 
emphasized in these areas through 
cooperation with private land 
owners and state and county 
governments. The areas will be 
identified on the ground with 
signs. The following special 
conditions will be attached to use 
authorizations approved within 
these areas : 

1) All construction equipment and 
vehicles will be cleaned prior to 
entering BLM Weed Free Zones. 

2) All hay, straw, unprocessed 
feed, and seed used in BLM Weed 
Free Zones must be certified free 



of specified noxious weeds listed 
in Colorado Weed Free Forage 
Certification standards. 

3) All authorized users of 
disturbed areas will be required 
to inventory for noxious weeds in 
both the spring and fall. 

Riparian Areas 

Objective : 

Insure that riparian areas on BLM 
land^ are in proper functioning 
condition. Management actions 
support the goals provided as 
indicators in Standard Two of the 
Standards for Public Land Health 
(See Appendix C) . 

Management ; 

Achieve an advanced ecological 
condition on all high and medium 
priority riparian habitats except 
where resource management 
objectives, including proper 
functioning condition, require an 
earlier successional stage. 

Improve 64 acres of high and 
medium priority riparian areas to 
proper functioning condition. 

Wildlife habitat improvements 
recommended for riparian areas in 
the Piceance Basin rmp will 
continue to be developed. 

The fenced exclosure on Trapper's 
Creek will be maintained to 
exclude livestock until riparian 
objectives are achieved. Once 
objectives are achieved, limited 
grazing use may be allowed inside 
the exclosure to help maintain 
riparian objectives. 

All potentially impacting land use 
activities will be required to 
avoid priority riparian habitats, 
unless it is determined through an 
environmental analysis that: 

(a) The activity will not degrade 



2-14 



Chapter 2 



or forestall attainment of the 
proper functioning condition of 
the riparian area; 

(b) Impacts could be mitigated in 
a manner that will meet minimum 
objectives for the system if the 
riparian areas could not be 
avoided. 

Existing activity and/or 
facilities that are negatively 
affecting the proper functioning 
condition of a riparian or wetland 
habitat may be required to 
undertake remedial mitigation, or 
relocate activities outside the 
high and medium priority riparian 
habitats upon authorization 
renewal or amendment . 

Existing roads may be required to 
be relocated in those 
circumstances where the road is 
having an adverse impact upon the 
proper functioning condition of 
the riparian or wetland area. 

Development of springs, seeps, and 
other project improvements will be 
designed to maintain or improve 
the ecological and hydrological 
values of those sites. 

Riparian-wetland objectives will 
be met by locating livestock 
management facilities (corrals or 
holding facilities, wells, 
pipelines, fences) or livestock 
management practices (salting and 
supplemental feeding) outside 
riparian-wetland areas. Existing 
livestock management facilities or 
practices that do not meet 
management objectives will be 
relocated or removed from all 
riparian habitats that are non- 
functioning or functioning at 
risk. 

Implementation: 

All high and medium riparian areas 
will be inventoried to determine 
their ecological status, 



functioning condition, and 
potential riparian plant 
community. The desired riparian 
plant community will be developed 
in activity plans or integrated 
activity plans. Tables 2-9 and 2- 
10 in Appendix D, list high and 
medium priority riparian habitats, 
respectively. Table 2-11 in 
Appendix D lists the low priority 
riparian habitats. 

Site specific resource management 
practices for riparian habitats 
will be developed as integrated 
activity plans or individual 
activity plans (allotment 
management plans) are developed. 
The plans will outline the 
management needed to meet riparian 
area objectives. The order in 
which management actions will be 
applied are be based on the 
following criteria: 

- Fisheries present 

- Special status species habitat 

- Potential for system improvement 

- Potential for persistent water 
flow 

- System, condition, trend, and 

vulnerability 

- Management potential 

- Amount of BLM land 

- Presence of other riparian 

dependent values 

Definitions of riparian 
functioning condition that will be 
used as an indicator of riparian 
health include: 

1) Proper Functioning Condition 
(PFC) : Riparian-wetland areas are 
functioning properly when adequate 
vegetation or landforms are 
present that help to: a) dissipate 
stream energy associated with high 
water flows, thereby reducing 
erosion and improving water 
quality; b) filter sediment, and 
aid floodplain development; c) 
improve flood-water retention and 
groundwater recharge; d) develop 



2-15 



Resource Decisions 



root masses that stabilize 
streambanks against cutting 
action; e) develop diverse ponding 
and channel characteristics to 
provide the habitat and the water 
depth, duration, and temperature 
needed for fish production, 
waterfowl breeding, and other 
uses; and f) support greater 
biodiversity. The functioning 
condition of riparian-wetland 
areas is a result of the 
interaction among geology, soil, 
water, and vegetation. 

2) Nonfunctional Condition: 
Riparian-wetland areas that are 
not providing adequate vegetation 
or landform to help dissipate 
stream energy associated with high 
stream flows, and thus are not 
accomplishing a) through f) above. 
The absence of physical attributes 
such as a floodplain, are 
indicators of non-functioning 
condition. 

3) Functional - At Risk: Riparian- 
wetland areas that are in 
functioning condition but an 
existing soil, water, or 
vegetation attribute makes them 
susceptible to degradation. 

Streambank stabilization projects 
will be identified and initiated 
through activity plans. 

Where assessments or monitoring 
data reveal that key resources or 
watershed functioning requirements 
are not being met because of 
livestock overuse, the Area 
Manager will adjust grazing use 
and may require total rest on all 
non-functioning riparian habitats 
and all high and medium priority 
habitats functioning at risk. 

Grazing systems and land 
improvements that optimize animal 
distribution and reduced livestock 
concentration in important 
riparian areas will be identified 



and developed in activity plans. 

Grazing practices (such as the 
COAs identified in Appendix B) 
that protect public health and 
welfare; maintain, restore, and/or 
improve water quality; and result 
in water quality that meets or 
exceeds state water quality 
standards, will be implemented 
through approvals of permits and 
leases on all high and medium 
priority and all non-functional 
low priority riparian habitats. 

Activities proposed within 
riparian habitats will be analyzed 
to determine whether the 
identified management objectives 
could be met. Those activities 
that do not meet the objectives 
will be modified to meet the 
objectives or will be denied. 

The need for additional exclosures 
and other riparian improvement 
projects will be identified during 
development of activity plans or 
allotment management plans. These 
plans will address the improvement 
objectives developed for priority 
riparian habitats. These plans 
will also incorporate the best 
management practices needed to 
achieve the desired improvement on 
a particular riparian habitat. 

Use of residual vegetation targets 
will be established through 
activity plans for all high and 
medium priority and all non- 
functioning riparian habitats to 
accomplish the following: 

(a) Maintain, improve, or restore 
both herbaceous and woody species 
to healthy and vigorous condition 
and facilitate reproduction and 
maintenance of different age 
classes in the desired riparian- 
wetland and aquatic plant 
communities; 



(b) 



Leave enough vegetation 



2-16 



Chapter 2 



biomass and plant residue 
(including woody debris) to allow 
adequate sediment filtering and 
dissipation of stream energy for 
bank protection. 

A decision to close riparian and 
wetland areas to off road 
motorized vehicle travel will be 
made during the development of the 
travel management plan. 

Forest product permits and mineral 
material disposal permits will not 
be issued within riparian 
wetland areas. 



Way authorizations. 



or 



Threatened And Endangered 
Plant Species 

Obiecti vp: 

Promote the recovery of Federally 
listed and proposed threatened or 
endangered plant species. 
Management actions are compatible 
with candidate and listed, 
threatened or endangered plant 
species and their habitats and 
support the goals contained in the 
Standards for Public Land Health, 
Standard Four (See Appendix C) . 

Management ; 

A No Surface Occupancy (NSO) 
stipulation will be placed on 
known and potential habitat of 
federally-listed and candidate T/E 
plants (approximately 45,400 
acres). New T/E plant habitat 
mapped as a result of future 
surveys will also be protected by 
a NSO stipulation. This 
stipulation will apply to all 
surface disturbing activities 
within these areas. 

Known and potential T/E habitat 
will be closed to mineral material 
disposal actions. 

All known and potential T/E 
habitat, including ACECs , will be 
exclusion areas for new Rights-of- 



Six areas (Dudley Bluffs, Yanks 
Gulch/Upper Greasewood Creek, Ryan 
Gulch, Raven Ridge Addition, Duck 
Creek and Raven Ridge) totaling 
14,660 acres of BLM land that are 
occupied by T/E plants or 
candidate T/E plants will be 
designated as Areas of Critical 
Environmental Concern (ACEC) . 

Motorized vehicle travel within 
ACECs for T/E plants will be 
limited to designated roads and 
trails (See Maps 2-23A through 2- 
23F) . Roads or trails in these 
areas not designated for use will 
be abandoned and reclaimed. Off 
road motorized vehicle travel will 
be prohibited in these areas. 

BLM will place a high priority on 
securing, through exchange with 
willing surface owners, known 
habitat for T/E plants and T/E 
plant populations occurring on 
private lands . 

Implementation ; 

As part of the recovery plan for 
Lesquerella congesta and Physaria 
obcordata, a high priority will be 
placed on acquiring surface and 
subsurface ownership of known 
habitats on private and state 
lands adjacent to ACECs. 

Prior to approving surface 
disturbing or potentially 
impacting activity within known or 
potential habitat for a listed, 
proposed or candidate plant 
species, a plant inventory 
conducted by a qualified botanist, 
and environmental analysis will be 
completed on the action. Based on 
the results of a plant survey, 
informal consultation with the 
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 
(USFWS) may be conducted during 
preparation of the environmental 
analysis. Formal consultation 
with the USFWS will occur if the 



2-17 



Resource Decisions 



environmental analysis indicates 
a finding of possible impact to a 
listed species and the proposed 
action cannot be moved to avoid 
the impact. 

The BLM Colorado State Office will 
place a NSO stipulation on new oil 
and gas leases issued in both 
known and potential T/E habitat. 
The Area Manager will attach the 
NSO stipulation to all other 
surface-disturbing land use 
authorizations approved in these 
habitat areas. New plant habitat 
may be identified through the 
requirement to conduct on-the- 
ground plant surveys prior to 
approving surface disturbing 
activities. All newly-identified 
habitat will be added to the NSO 
data base maintained in the 
Resource Area and State Offices. 

The above NSO stipulation may be 
exempted by the Area Manager if an 
environmental analysis and the 
results of an on-the-ground survey 
indicate that no sensitive plants 
will be impacted or affected by 
the action. 

Existing roads and public utility 
Rights-of-Way (pipelines, power 
lines, and communication 
facilities) within known T/E 
habitat may be relocated if a 
determination is made that the 
relocation action will benefit and 
promote recovery and will not 
further impact a T/E plant 
species . 

BLM will cooperate with the 
Colorado Natural Areas Program, 
the Colorado Natural Heritage 
Program, and the USFWS to evaluate 
species status and distribution 
and to monitor effectiveness of 
protection and conservation 
measures for T/E and special 
status plant species. 

Sensitive Plants and 



Remnant Vegetation 

Associations 

Objective : 

Provide for the conservation, 
protection and management of high 
priority remnant vegetation 
associations (RVAs) and unique 
plant communities, inorder to 
avoid the need for subsequent 
listing and protection of these 
species under the Endangered 
Species Act. Management actions 
are compatible with the goals 
identified in Standard Three of 
the Standards for Public Land 
Health (See Appendix C) . 



Management : 

Thirteen areas (Deer Gulch, Lower 
Greasewood Creek, South Cathedral 
Bluffs, Dudley Bluffs, Yanks 
Gulch/Upper Greasewood Creek, 
Soldier Creek, South Cathedral 
Addition, Raven Ridge Addition, 
White River Riparian, Coal Oil 
Rim, Moosehead Mountain, Oil 
Spring Mountain and Raven Ridge) 
that are occupied by BLM sensitive 
plants and RVAs (totaling 54,87 
acres) , will be designated as 
ACECs. NSO stipulations will be 
attached to all use authorizations 
encompassing these areas. 

A NSO stipulation will also be 
placed on known and potential 
habitat (approximately 4,52 
acres) of BLM sensitive plants and 
remnant vegetation associations 
(RVA) occurring outside ACECs. 

BLM sensitive plants and RVA 
locations will be closed to the 
disposal of mineral materials. 

Motorized vehicle travel within 
designated ACECs will be allowed 
only on designated roads and 
trails. Motorized vehicle travel 
within known locations of 
sensitive plants and high priority 
RVAs that are located outside the 



2-18 



areas designated as ACECs, will be 
limited to existing roads and 
trails. Roads not designated for 
use within ACECs will be abandoned 
and reclaimed. 

Implements 1- i nn • 

The BLM Colorado State Office 
personnel will attach a NSO 
stipulation to new oil and gas 
leases issued within the above 
identified ACECs, and the known 
and potential habitat for 
sensitive plant and RVA locations. 
The Area Manager will also attach 
a NSO stipulation to all surface- 
disturbing use authorizations 
proposed within these sensitive 
plant and RVA locations. 

In order to meet the exception 
criteria established for the NSO 
stipulations, on the ground 
surveys, conducted by a qualified 
botanist, will be required prior 
to the approval of surface 
disturbing activities within areas 
of known or potential habitats and 
ACECs developed for these species. 
The Area Manager can exempt the 
NSO stipulation if the results of 
the on-the-ground survey and the 
environmental analysis conducted 
on the proposed action indicates 
a finding of no significant 
impact. 

New sensitive plant locations, 
mapped as a result of future 
surveys, will be added to the data 
bases maintained for the NSO 
stipulations. 

Reclamation of surface disturbance 
resulting from authorized 
activities within ACECs and RVAs 
will use only locally gathered, or 
genetic stock from locally 
gathered, native species. In 
cases where locally gathered 
native species are not available, 
the impact of using non-local 
native species on the genetic 
integrity of native species will 



Chapter 2 

be evaluated and mitigated through 
site specific environmental 
analysis . 

High priority sensitive plant 
species and RVAs occurring on 
private or state-owned lands 
adjacent to ACECs may be 
identified for possible 
acquisition through exchange. 
Known locations of high priority 
sensitive plant species and RVAs 
within ACECs will not be available 
for disposal. 

The BLM will cooperate with the 
Colorado Natural Areas Program, or 
other interested parties, to 
monitor the effectiveness of 
conservation and protection 
measures for BLM and Colorado 
sensitive plants and high priority 
RVAs. 



FORESTRY 

Timber lands 

Objective: 

Determine the sustainable annual 
allowable timberland harvest level 
on suitable commercial and non- 
commercial timberlands. 

Manage timberlands to maintain 
productivity, extent, forest 
structure, and enhancement of 
other resources. 

Provide special management 
consideration for special or 
unique forest/woodland areas. 

Management: 

Douglas-fir, Lodgepole and 
Spruce/fir stands will not have 
a commercial timber harvest 
program developed. If demand or 
other resource objectives warrant, 
a commercial harvest program may 
be developed in which harvest will 
be limited to four acres per year. 

A ten cord per year, personal use 



2-19 



Resource Decisions 



limit, will be established on dead 
and down spruce and Douglas-fir 
within the Piceance, 
Douglas/Cathedral, and 
Danforth/ Jensen GRAs . 

No allowable harvest limit will be 
established for aspen. A ten cord 
per year, personal use limit will 
be established for aspen firewood 
in the Danforth/ Jensen, Piceance, 
and Douglas /Cathedral GRAs. 

A harvest limit of 50 saplings and 
200 seedlings per year will be 
established for aspen. Permits 
will be limited to the Danforth 
Hills/Jensen areas. 

Older forests stands will be 
managed to preserve existing old 
growth. Sales will be precluded 
in sensitive areas having fragile 
soils and soils with high slumping 
potential, wilderness study areas, 
and habitat for candidate and 
listed T/E plant species. 
Regeneration of cut areas will 
occur by natural means. If 
planting becomes necessary, only 
local species and genotypes will 
be used. Fragmentation will be 
minimized by aggregating cutting 
units which reflect the natural 
age distribution of the area. An 
attempt will be made to mimic 
natural edges and gaps during 
tract design and layout. 

Coal Oil Rim and Moosehead 
Mountain will be designated as 
ACECs to protect timberlands 
(aspen) and woodlands. 

Implementation: 

Commercial and non-commercial 
timber stands will be inventoried 
for condition and production 
capability. Management 
prescriptions designed to maintain 
and enhance these stands and 
achieve the desired plant 
community will be determined 
during preparation of activity 



plans. In the case of disease or 
insect infestation, a 
determination will be made on the 
need for treatment. Reasonable 
treatments will be developed 
through environmental analysis. 
There will be no harvest allowed 
within areas containing T/E or 
sensitive plant species, 
Wilderness Study Areas, special 
management areas, Research Natural 
Areas, Outstanding Natural Areas, 
recreation sites, or special 
habitats such as rocky outcrops, 
wetlands, and riparian areas. 

All permits for harvest of 
woodland products will be subject 
to provisions and specifications 
listed in BLM Manual Handbook 
5420-1 and the conditions of 
approval listed in Appendix B. 
All restrictions and 
specifications will be included 
in, or attached to, the permit 
authorizing harvest. 

Forestry management guidelines 
will concur with the individual 
plans developed for management of 
ACECS . 

Woodlands 

Objective: 

Manage woodlands to maintain 
productivity, extent, forest 
structure and enhancement of other 
resources . 

Determine annual allowable 
woodland harvest levels on 
suitable commercial and non- 
commercial woodlands. 

Management : 

Commercial 

Approximately 27,600 acres of 
suitable woodland will be 
available for commercial harvest 
within the Piceance and 
Douglas/Cathedral Geographic 
Reference Areas (GRA) . Woodlands 
will not be available for 



2-20 



Chapter 2 



commercial harvest in other GRAs . 

Commercial permits will not be 
issued for the harvest of oak. 

Commercial permits will be issued 
without limit for pinyon and 
juniper Christmas trees and 
transplants within the 
Douglas/Cathedral, Piceance, 
Crooked Wash/Deep Channel, Wolf 
Ridge /Red Wash , and 
Danforth/ Jensen GRAs. No harvest 
will be permitted within the White 
River and Blue Mountain GRAs. 

Juniper posts and poles will have 
the following annual commercial 
and personal use harvest limits bv 
GRA: . 

1. Douglas/Cathedral GRA - 1,500 

2. Piceance GRA - 1,500 



3 . Crooked Wash/Deep Channel 



500 



be 

the 



4. Wolf Ridge/Red Wash - 200 

Posts and poles will not 

commercially harvested in 
other GRAs. 

Non-commercial 

A total of 493,190 acres of 
pinyon/juniper woodlands have been 
classified as noncommercial. 
These woodlands are not considered 
in the allowable harvest and will 
not be managed for commercial 
firewood production. 

Non-commercial woodlands will be 
available for manipulation to 
enhance other resource values. 

Private use permits for the 
harvest of firewood will be issued 
for the Piceance, Danforth/ Jensen, 
Wolf Ridge/Red Wash, Crooked 
Wash/Deep Channel and 
Douglas /Cathedral GRAs only. 

Private use oakbrush firewood 
permits will be issued based on a 
resource area wide limit of 2 



cords per year. Oakbrush harvest 
will be limited to the Piceance, 
Douglas/Cathedral, and 
Danforth/ Jensen GRAs. 

Private use permits will be issued 
for Christmas trees and 
transplanting within the 
Douglas/Cathedral, Piceance, 
Crooked Wash/Deep Channel, and 
Wolf Ridge/Red Wash GRAs. No 
permits will be issued for the 
Blue Mountain and White River 
GRAs. 

Private use permits for collection 
of brush transplants, primarily 
rabbitbrush, serviceberry, and 
chokecherry will be issued without 
limit within the 
Douglas/Cathedral, Piceance, 
Crooked Wash/Deep Channel , 
Danforth/ Jensen, and Wolf 
Ridge/Red Wash GRAs. 

Implementation ; 

Commercial 

Based on a 300-year rotation for 
clearcutting, the annual allowable 
commercial harvest will be 4 5 
acres. Based on a 100-year 
rotation for selective cutting, 
the annual allowable harvest will 
be 136 acres. The allowable 
harvest will be monitored as a 
decadal limit which will allow for 
yearly fluctuations. 

Suitable commercial woodlands 
removed by commercial development, 
wild fire, or vegetation 
modifications will be considered 
as part of the allowable cut. 

Sale preparation and actual 
volumes of wood sold will be 
dependant on funding and demand. 
Over the counter sales will remain 
the highest priority for the sale 
program. 

non-commercial 

Within the Piceance GRA, all 
personal use harvesting will be 



2-21 



Resource Decisions 



restricted to designated harvest 
areas . 

Harvest will be restricted to dead 
or down wood only, with the 
exception of specifically marked 
green tree harvest areas. 

The limit per household for 
firewood will be six cords per 
year. No resource area wide 
harvest limits will be set for 
private use. 

Three Christmas trees and 3 
transplants will be the limit per 
year per household. 

Prior to undertaking manipulation 
removal techniques (chaining, 
dozing, prescribed fire) , woodland 
products will be made available to 
the public through sales or free 
use. 

Commercial /Non-commercial 

There will be no harvest within 
areas containing T/E or sensitive 
plant species, Wilderness Study 
Areas, special management areas, 
Research Natural Areas, 
Outstanding Natural Areas, 
recreation sites, or special 
habitats such as rocky outcrops, 
wetlands, and riparian areas. 

Commercial and non-commercial 
woodlands will be inventoried for 
condition, and production 
capability. Management 
prescriptions to maintain and 
enhance these woodlands, or to 
achieve the desired plant 
community, will be determined at 
the activity planning level. In 
the case of disease or insect 
infestation, there will be a 
determination made of the need for 
treatment. Management 
prescriptions developed for 
treatment will require site 
specific environmental analysis. 
Mitigation identified during 
preparation of the environmental 



analysis will be made a part of 
any treatment . 

Commercial and non-commercial 
woodlands removed as a result of 
development (ie., oil shale, oil 
and gas, sodium) will be appraised 
and purchased prior to removal. 

All permits for harvest of 
woodland products will be subject 
to the specifications listed in 
BLM Manual Handbook 5420-1 and the 
COAs listed in Appendix B. All 
restrictions, and specifications 
will be included in, or attached 
to, the permit authorizing 
harvest. 

Although no harvest is proposed 
within any of the ACECs , the 
forestry/woodland decisions will 
concur with the decisions 
developed within the individual 
ACEC management plans. 

Basic concepts that will be 
followed in maintaining forest 
health are: 1) Sales will be 
precluded in sensitive areas 
having fragile soils or areas of 
high slumping potential, 2) 
wilderness study areas, and 3) 
habitat for candidate and listed 
T/E plant species. Regeneration 
of cut areas will occur by natural 
means. If planting becomes 
necessary, only local species and 
genotypes will be used. 
Fragmentation will be minimized by 
aggregating cutting units. Tract 
design and layout will attempt to 
mimic natural edges and gaps. 

LIVESTOCK GRAZING 

Objective: 

Maintain or enhance a healthy 
rangeland vegetative composition 
and species diversity, capable of 
supplying forage at a sustained 
yield to meet the demand for 
livestock grazing. 



2-22 



Chapter 2 



Provide for adequate forage plant 
growth and/ or regrowth opportunity 
necessary to: 1) replenish the 
plants food reserves; and 2) 
produce sufficient seed to meet 
the reproduction needs necessary 
to maintain an ecological presence 
in the plant community. 

Management- ; 

With _ minor exceptions, livestock 
grazing will be managed as 
described in the 1981 Rangeland 
Program Summary (RPS) . That 
document is the Record of Decision 
for the 1981 White River Grazing 
Management Final Environmental 
Impact Statement (Grazing EIS) . 
These documents along with the RPS 
updates issued in 1981 and 1984, 
address five major actions: 

1) allocation of forage among 
predominant grazing animals and 
other uses; 

2) initiation of intensive grazing 
management; 

3) continuation of exiting 
intensive grazing management 
practices; 

4) minimum period of rest for each 
allotment; and 

5) identification of range 
improvements to enhance rangeland 
productivity and management. 

The above decisions and management 1 
actions are carried foreword into 
this document. 

Livestock grazing use levels have 
been reduced from 160,310 AUMs 
authorized in 1980 to the present 
level of 12 6,49 AUMs. The 
current allocation of 126,490 AUMs 
will continue for the short term. 

A minimum rest requirement (period 
of no livestock grazing) will be 
developed for each allotment as 



integrated activity plans are 
developed. This period of rest is 
the minimum time required to 
restore plant vigor, improve 
watershed conditions, and improve 
rangeland conditions. Minimum 
rest periods will be incorporated 
into grazing systems during 
activity plan preparation (See 
Appendix C, Colorado Livestock 
Grazing Management Guidelines). 

Livestock trailing use will be 
authorized to and from BLM grazing 
allotments along established 
trails on 9,600 acres of BLM land. 
Established trails include the 
White River Trail, Victory Trail, 
Dragon Trail, Yellow Jacket Trail, 
Ute Trail, and Staley Mine Trail, 
all collectively known as the 
White River Trail Allotment 6699. 
Crossing permits will be 
authorized on public land outside 
established trails on a case-by- 
case basis, based upon the 
applicant's need. 

Livestock grazing permits/leases 
will be issued on BLM land within 
the Oak Ridge and Jensen State 
Wildlife Areas, and the Little 
Hills Experiment Station under the 
following conditions: 

1) the Livestock permittee has 
authorization to graze 
livestock on adjoining state 
lands. 

2) Livestock grazing use will 
enhance or maintain wildlife 
habitat values and objectives 
developed for the three areas. 

3) Livestock grazing will be 
suspended or eliminated if 
livestock use has either achieved 
wildlife habitat objectives or are 
detracting from habitat objectives 
developed for the three areas. 

Changes in the kind of livestock 
to domestic sheep will not be 



2-23 



Resource Decisions 



authorized on grazing allotments 
north of U.S. Highway 40. An 
exception may be granted if an 
environmental analysis 
demonstrated that there will be no 
impacts to the Rocky Mountain 
Bighorn Sheep populations located 
in^ Dinosaur National Monument. 
Existing domestic sheep allotments 
north of U.S. Highway 40 will 
continue to be authorized. 

Implement a r i on ■ 

The forage allocations made in the 

1981 Rangeland Program Summary for 

livestock will continue until 

sufficient data exists to require 

modification. A total of 126,490 

AUMs will be allocated to 

livestock in the short term (10 to 

20 years) . It is estimated that 

a total of 146,060 AUMs could be 

allocated to livestock over the 

long-term (over 20 years) through 

increases in sustainable rangeland 

production resulting from 

vegetation manipulations, improved 

livestock distribution and 

management, and improved rangeland 

health. 

Adjustments in livestock levels 
were made after issuing the RPS in 
April 1981. Most adjustments were 
completed by the end of 1986. 
Additional adjustments were made 
between 1987 to the present based 
upon results of additional 
monitoring studies and losses of 
BLM land acreage. 

Monitoring studies will continue 
to be conducted on 81 grazing 
allotments to evaluate the effects 
of activity plan development and, 
if necessary, to further refine 
livestock grazing levels. 
Additional adjustments in 
livestock grazing levels, as a 
result of increases or decreases 
in forage, will follow procedures 
outlined in 43 CFR 4110. 

Increases in available forage will 



be apportioned among competing 
uses by: 1) filling the suspended 
livestock grazing preferences for 
the allotment; 2) providing big 
game wildlife forage needs; and 3) 
increasing wild horse forage 
allocations. This process may be 
modified during development of 
integrated activity plans. 
Increases or decreases in 
available forage will be 
apportioned according to the 
allocation levels developed in 
integrated activity plans or 
allotment management plans. 

The 144 grazing allotments 
affected by this RMP have been 
placed in one of three management 
categories (improve, custodial, 
and maintain) that define 
intensity of management: The 
intent of categorization is to 
concentrate funding and on-the- 
ground management efforts on those 
allotments where actions are most 
needed to improve the resources, 
or resolve serious resource 
conflicts. Table 2-12 in 
Appendix D lists the total 
allotments in each category. 
Table 2-13 in Appendix D lists the 
individual allotments in each 
category. Allotment categories 
are depicted on Map 2-9. 

The 54 allotments placed in the 
improve category were identified 
for development of allotment 
management plans (AMPs) . The AMPs 
will direct livestock management 
through decisions, such as: 1) 
grazing systems; 2) season-of-use; 
3) number and kind of livestock; 
and 4) range developments or 
vegetative treatments. 

To date, AMPs have been developed 
for 19 improve category allotments 
involving 664,680 acres of BLM 
land. These allotments authorize 
a livestock grazing use level of 
58,650 AUMs (Appendix D, Table 2- 
13). AMPs for the remaining 3 5 



2-24 



Chapter 2 



allotments in the improve category 
will be developed as time and 
funding permit. Current livestock 
grazing levels and management 
practices will continue to be 
authorized on the 3 6 maintain and 
54 custodial category allotments. 
The improve category allotments 
will ^ receive highest priority for 
public funding for needed 
rangeland improvements and 
livestock management facilities. 
The custodial category allotments 
will receive the lowest priority 
for public funding of rangeland 
improvements . 

Allotments could be moved from one 
category to another as new 
information becomes available, 
resource conditions change, or 
management activities " are 
implemented. Development of 
integrated activity plans will 
include all allotments within the 
activity plan boundaries, 
regardless of current management 
category. 

The majority of BLM land is used 

by livestock during the spring and 

early summer growing periods. 

Grazing use normally occurs late 

enough in the growing season 

(elevations below 7,000 feet) that 

forage plants do not regrow prior 

to their dormancy in early summer. 

Without regrowth prior to 

dormancy, the forage plants do not 

mature to set seed and replenish 

food reserves. Minimum rest 

periods have been developed and 

will be proposed for the spring 

and early summer growing periods. 

These rest periods are intended to 

provide an interval of nonuse for 

the forage plants so that they can 

fulfill the basic physiological 

requirements for maintenance of 

growth, vigor, and adequate 

reproduction. In addition, the 

rest period will reduce livestock 

trampling damage to plants and 

soil during wet soil conditions 



after the spring thaw. The 
frequency of the proposed rest 
periods will be based on the 
rangeland condition of each 
allotment. It is anticipated that 
there will be more frequent spring 
rests proposed for early-seral 
rangelands than for Mid or late- 
seral rangelands. 

Rest can be provided in an 
alternate year sequence or on a 
yearly basis. Minimum rest for a 
range area may be satisfied in two 
ways: 1) exclude the entire area 
from livestock grazing; or 2) 
subdivide the area to permit 
livestock use on one or more 
subunits, while the remaining unit 
or units are left unused. 

Activity plans prescribing grazing 
management activities will be 
developed and implemented for all 
allotments in the improve 
category. Development of 
integrated activity plans will 
include all allotments within the 
activity plan boundaries 
regardless of current management 
category. Minimum rest periods 
will be incorporated into grazing 
systems during activity plan 
development. These plans will 
include the required NEPA 
analysis . 

Rangeland improvements will be 
identified in activity plans. 
Range improvements are necessary 
to control livestock use and 
improve rangeland condition. 
Anticipated improvement needs will 
include approximately 2 00 miles of 
fencing and about 700 water 
developments, including 
reservoirs, wells, springs with 
associated troughs, tanks and 
pipelines. Range improvements 
will be subject to the conditions 
of approval (COA) contained in 
Appendix B (numbers 132 through 
141) . These COAs are referenced 
to the appropriate Colorado 



2-25 



Resource Decisions 



Livestock Grazing Management 
Guidelines contained in Appendix 
C. 

The estimated number of acres of 
pinyon- juniper , sagebrush-mountain 
browse, and greasewood that will 
be manipulated to improve 
rangeland conditions is shown in 
Table 2-8 of Appendix D. 

Changes in management categories 
will be supported by a documented 
analysis . 

WILD HORSES 

Objective : 

Manage for a wild horse herd of 
95-140 animals on 190,130 acres 
within the Piceance-East Douglas 
Herd Management Area (HMA) so that 
a thriving ecological balance is 
maintained for all plant and 
animal species on that range. 

Management : 

Wild horses will be managed to 
provide a healthy, viable breeding 
population with a diverse age 
structure . 

The North Piceance and West 
Douglas Herd Areas will be managed 
in the short-term (0-10 years) to 
provide forage for a herd of to 
5 horses in each herd area. The 
long term objective (+10 years) 
will be to remove all wild horses 
from these areas (See Map 2-10) . 

The boundary of the Piceance-East 
Douglas HMA will be expanded to 
include the Greasewood allotment 
(presently a part of the North 
Piceance Herd Area) . 

The wild horse herd population 
will be managed to improve range 

condition. 

Implementation: 

Develop a cooperative management 



agreement with the private surface 
owner of 13,900 acres of patented 
oil shale claims that lie within 
the Boxelder Allotment and Pasture 
C of the Square S Allotment. 

Update and revise the Piceance- 
East Douglas Herd Management Area 
Plan. 

Monitoring studies will be 
conducted and the long term 
appropriate management level (AML) 
for the Herd Management Area will 
be adjusted based on the results 
of this monitoring. 

WILDLIFE HABITAT 
Big Game 

Objective: 

Ensure that big game habitats 
provide components and conditions 
necessary to sustain big game 
populations at levels commensurate 
with multiple use objectives and 
state-established population 
objectives . 

Management : 

Maintain or enhance the 

productivity and quality of 

preferred forages on all big game 

ranges. 

Provide the forms, distribution 
and extent of vegetative cover and 
forage that satisfy the 
physiological and behavioral 
requirements of big game. 

Reduce the duration, extent, and 
intensity of manageable forms of 
animal harassment during crucial 
timeframes, and avoidance -induced 
disuse of suitable habitats 
considered limited in supply 
and/or critical in fulfilling 
special functions. 

Big game forage allocations will 
remain the same as identified in 



2-26 



Chapter 2 



the 19 81 Grazing Management 
Environmental Impact Statement and 
subsequent Rangeland Program 
Summary (RPS) under the following 
criteria: 1) in locations where 
rangelands and grazable woodlands 
are in a healthy state; and 2) 
where at risk rangeland and 
grazable woodland conditions are 
improving. The grazing EIS 
allocated 71,600 AUMs to 1,926 
elk, 51,526 deer, and 224 
pronghorn. 

Approximately 69,441 AUMs will be 
required to support CDOW's most 
current big game population 
objectives, involving 5,526 elk, 
3 9,02 6 deer, and 268 pronghorn. 

Livestock redistribution 
techniques will be employed to 
defer concentrated use of aspen 
and other special use habitats of 
deer and elk until after August 
15. 

Habitat conditions sufficient to 
support a minimum winter deer 
population of 2 4,90 on BLM Land 
in the Piceance Basin will be 
maintained as a critical 
threshold. Once development has 
met or exceeded this threshold, 
limitations to further development 
may occur. 

The acreage identified as 
unsuitable for further coal 
leasing based on wildlife issues 
will be modified with updated 
wildlife information as coal lease 
applications are received. 
Reapplication of the coal 
unsuitability criteria will be 
completed in coordination with the 
Colorado Division of Wildlife. 

Implementation: 

The production, quality or 
availability of preferred big game 
forage will be enhanced as 
necessary to accommodate 
prescribed big game population 



objectives. Forage deficiencies 
will be remedied, where possible, 
through various habitat treatments 
and livestock management 
techniques. Forage allocations 
will be reevaluated in areas where 
at-risk rangelands and grazable 
woodlands are in a downward trend 
or where riparian, rangelands, and 
grazable woodlands are not 
functioning properly. 

Vegetation manipulations, animal 
redistribution or reduction 
techniques, and modified livestock 
grazing management will be used 
to: 

1) reduce use of Utah serviceberry 
and mountain mahogany current 
annual growth (CAG) to <70 percent 
dormant season use and <10 percent 
growing season use on all deer and 
elk winter ranges (See Maps 2-11 
and 2-12, respectively); 

2) eliminate growing season use of 
key woody forage on deer and 
pronghorn severe winter ranges and 
winter concentration areas; 

3) reduce the proportion of 
heavily hedged key browse (e.g. 
Cole browse survey method) on deer 
severe winter range to <3 5 
percent ; and 

4) maintain cumulative use of 
other important woody forages 
(e.g. saltbush, sagebrush) on deer 
and elk winter ranges and all 
pronghorn ranges at rates 
consistent with sustained plant 
vigor. 

Forage and cover enhancement 
measures will be used to help 
resolve forage conflicts, reduce 
excessive use, enhance or augment 
forage availability or quality, or 
redistribute animal use. 

Significant reductions in 
essential winter forage bases will 



2-27 



Resource Decisions 



be minimized by limiting 
cumulative treatment of suitable 
sagebrush forage types on deer 
winter ranges and pronghorn 
overall ranges (See Maps 2-11 and 
2-13, respectively). Cumulative 
reductions of suitable forage 
types will be limited to 50 
percent of suitable habitat within 
one mile radii, and not to exceed 
20 percent of total type within 
individual GRAs . Treatment of 
suitable sagebrush forage types on 
deer severe winter ranges and 
pronghorn winter ranges will be 
confined, where possible, to 
suboptimal stands and excess cover 
types. Cumulative reductions of 
suitable forage types on deer 
severe winter range and pronghorn 
winter range will be limited to 2 
percent within one mile radii 
where involvement is unavoidable. 

All vegetation manipulations will 
be subject to the following design 
guidelines to maintain or enhance 
favorable distribution of big game 
cover: 



Long-term serai or type 
conversions of aspen, Douglas-fir, 
spruce- fir, and deciduous shrub 
communities will be avoided to the 
extent practicable. Where 
unavoidable, special stipulations 
will be applied requiring 
reclamation measures necessary to 
maintain site potential and 
restore the desired composition 
and serai stage of the former 
community. Serai manipulations of 
Douglas-fir, spruce-fir, and aspen 
will be limited to those projects 
specifically designed or 
conditioned to achieve objectives 
pertaining to stand perpetuation, 
enhancement of interstand 
diversity, and riparian 
improvement. A CSU stipulation 
(see Appendix A) will be imposed 
on all land use activities that 
involve aspen, serviceberry and 
chokecherry communities north of 
Highway 4 as a means of 
maintaining the distribution, 
condition, and functional capacity 
of high priority wildlife 
habitats. 



1) achieve an approximate 60:40 
forage to cover ratio on the basis 
of 1.0 mile radii across all deer 
and elk ranges. Distribute cover 
such that 600-1,200 feet of 
effective security cover remains 
available within 600 feet of any 
point in the treatment area; 

2) reserve or allow development of 
coniferous canopies >70 percent 
(or densest available) and >300 
feet in width on >10 percent of 
all elk/deer winter ranges and on 
> 20 percent of severe winter 
ranges on the basis of one mile 
radii; and 



Monitoring will be conducted to 
determine which rangelands are 
healthy, at risk, and/or not 
properly functioning. 

Recommendations for enhancing or 
increasing the big game forage 
base or revising forage use 
allocations among predominant 
grazers will be considered through 
integrated activity plans. 

Water sources will be installed on 
pronghorn overall range and deer 
and elk critical summer ranges 
(See Maps 2-14 and 2-15, 
respectively) . 



3) retain a minimum 3 00 feet of 
untreated buffers interconnected 
with other forms of cover around 
specialized use areas and travel 
lanes . 



Habitat treatment and management 
guidelines will be applied during 
the NEPA analysis of individual 
project proposals and will be 
integrated, where appropriate, 
within approved project design. 



2-28 



These projects will normally be 

implemented through approved 

activity plans (e.g. allotment 

management plans) prior to 

development of integrated activity 

plans. Big game habitat treatment 

and management objectives will be 

incorporated with the planning and 

development of all integrated 

activity plans. Similarly, road 

density objectives will be 

developed through a travel 

management plan or integrated 

activity plan. The Piceance Basin 

Habitat Management Plan will be 

revised incrementally through the 

development of integrated activity 

plans . 

Stipulations listed in Appendix A 
will be applied to all BLM- 
conducted and permitted surface- 
use activities in big game 
habitats. Permitted land use 
activities that may disrupt animal 
behavior or habitat utility during 
sensitive time frames will be 
subject to timing limitations on 
severe winter ranges (all 
species), elk and pronghorn 
production areas, and deer and elk 
summer ranges designated as 
critical habitat. a NSO 
stipulation will be applied to the 
Oak Ridge State Wildlife Area as 
a means of precluding the effects 
of mineral development on locally 
significant big game habitats and 
populations. Maps 2-3, 2-4, and 
2-5 show locations of NSO, TL, and 
CSU stipulations, respectively. 
Mitigation measures will be 
applied as conditions of approval 
(COA) to existing land use 
authorizations involving surface- 
disturbing activities to emulate 
the intent of these stipulations 
to the extent allowable. COAs 
will not violate valid existing 
rights. 

Exception and modification 
provisions (see Appendix A) 
provide some flexibility in 



Chapter 2 

implementing the stipulations and 
allows site-specific tailoring of 
prescriptions to gain effective 
protection of identified values 
without unnecessarily hindering 
other forms of public land use. 
These provisions provide the 
opportunity to integrate new or 
innovative technologies and 
information to better manage, 
protect, or compensate for 
wildlife related values or 
otherwise promote the accumulation 
of information necessary to better 
identify, assess, and manage 
wildlife values. 

Road abandonments and seasonal 

closures during periods of animal 

occupation will be used, to the 

extent practical, to limit 

effective road densities to an 

average maximum 1.5 miles/square 

mile on big game critical habitats 

and three miles/square mile on 

remaining big game ranges. 

Restrictions could be temporarily 

excepted to achieve special 

management needs (e.g. increase 

harvest) . These road density 

objectives will be developed 

through site specific travel 

management or integrated activity 

plans. Special conditions of 

approval will be applied through 

the environmental analysis process 

to preclude or discourage 

continued vehicular traffic on 

linear rights-of-way within closed 

areas. The Moosehead Road Closure 

Area and BLM lands within the Oak 

Ridge State Wildlife Area will 

continue to be closed to general 

motorized vehicle travel. 

Raptors 

Objective: 

Maintain the short-term utility 
and promote the continued long- 
term development and availability 
of suitable raptor habitats. This 
includes prey base, nest sites, 
and other special habitat features 



2-29 



Resource Decisions 



necessary to help stabilize or 
allow increases in regional raptor 
populations . 

Management : 

Land use activities that involve 
long-term, undesirable reductions 
or fragmentation of aspen, spruce- 
fir, Douglas-fir, or oakbrush 
communities will be avoided to the 
extent possible. This can be 
accomplished through relocation 
and design modifications developed 
on a site-specific and case-by- 
case basis. Where unavoidable, 
special reclamation measures will 
be required to accelerate 
reestablishment of former plant 
community characteristics. 

Permitted land use activities 
within 1/4 mile of functional nest 
sites of cavity, cliff, and 
ground-nesting species, and within 
1/2 mile of functional nest sites 
of special status and tree-nesting 
species, will be subject to 
relocation or design modifications 
to preclude, or reduce to 
acceptable levels, long-term 
reduction or deterioration of nest 
and foraging habitat. 

Where practical, trees suitable 
for long and short term cavity 
excavation will be reserved during 
woodland clearing or thinning 
practices at levels equal to or 
greater than the following: 

1) within pinyon- juniper : one-12" 
diameter tree/acre or comparable; 

2) within other conifer types: 
two-12" diameter trees/acre or 
comparable; and 

3) within aspen: three- 12" 
diameter trees /acre or comparable. 

Disruptive land use activities 
will not be allowed within the 
following specified radii of 
active raptor nest sites during 



the period from nest territory 
establishment to dispersal of 
young from nest: 

1) non-special status species: 1/4 
mile; and 

2) special status species: 1/2 

mile 

Disruptive surface occupation or 
adverse habitat modification will 
be prohibited within 1/4 mile of 
functional nest sites of special 
status species (i.e. listed, 
proposed, candidate, and BLM 
sensitive) and 1/8 mile of other 
members of the raptor group. 

New construction or modification 
of above ground electric 
transmission facilities will be 
required to incorporate the most 
current raptor protection 
guidelines. Where appropriate, 
conductor separation methods will 
be employed rather than features 
that discourage perching. 

The saltbush-sagebrush- juniper 
community north of the White River 
from Utah to Pinyon Ridge will be 
designated as a BLM Key Raptor 
Area. This action will serve to 
administratively highlight the 
importance of this area's breeding 
population of ferruginous hawks. 

Implementation: 

Existing information on raptor 
nest locations will be verified 
and combined with supplemental 
surveys conducted on a project- 
driven basis. This information 
will be maintained within a 
computer data base. Nest habitat 
character associated with project 
proposals will also be evaluated 
on this basis. These evaluations 
will be utilized in developing 
criteria for modifying, excepting, 
or waiving stipulation provisions, 
and to develop project design 
modifications or alternatives. 



2-30 



Habitat treatment and management 
guidelines will be applied during 
the NEPA process as mitigation 
measures or conditions of 
approval. Modified implementation 
features for individual project 
proposals will be integrated 
within approved project design. 
These treatment projects will 
normally be implemented through 
approved activity plans (e.g. 
Allotment Management Plans or 
integrated activity plans) . 
Raptor habitat treatment and 
management objectives will be 
incorporated within the planning 
and development of all integrated 
activity plans. 

NSO and TL stipulations will be 

applied, where appropriate (See 

Appendix A) , to all permitted 

surface use activities through 

various use authorizations or 

leasing processes. These 

protective stipulations will be 

applied to surface use activities 

associated with existing land use 

authorizations as mitigation 

measures or COAs during the NEPA 

process. COAs will not violate 

valid existing rights. 

Exception and modification 

provisions (see Appendix A) 

provide some flexibility in 

implementing the stipulations. 

They also allow site-specific 

tailoring of prescriptions to gain 

effective protection of identified 

values without unnecessarily 

hindering other forms of public 

land use. These provisions 

provide the opportunity to 

integrate new or innovative 

technologies and information to 

better manage, protect, or 

compensate for wildlife related 

values. They will also promote 

the accumulation of information 

necessary to better identify, 

assess, and manage wildlife 

values. 



Chapter 2 

Development proponents will be 
required to perform raptor nest 
inventories in affected nest 
habitats when proposed land use 
influence exceeds 100 acres. When 
possible, inventories will allow 
for a full nesting sequence for 
investigation prior to project 
implementation. 

BLM will assume responsibility for 
conducting nest and habitat 
surveys on certain smaller 
projects and on BLM initiated 
projects. 

Grouse 

Objective: 

Restore, maintain, or enhance 
habitat conditions and features 
conducive to the maintenance or 
expansion of native grouse 
populations . 

Reduce disruption of important 
seasonal use activities associated 
with production and recruitment. 

Management: 

Suitable sage grouse habitats (See 
Map^ 2-16) will be enhanced by 
manipulating suboptimal sagebrush 
stands, or converting stands with 
undesirable composition to 
suitable cover types. 

Riparian, livestock, and water 
management techniques will be 
designed to enhance riparian and 
wet/mesic meadow habitat on all 
grouse brood ranges. 

Surface occupation and long term 
conversion or adverse modification 
of the following sage grouse 
habitats will be avoided: 

1) sagebrush stands with <50 
percent canopy and <30" in height, 
and <2 miles from a lek; 

2) sagebrush stands with <3 
percent canopy and <3 0" in height 



2-31 



Resource Decisions 



>2 miles from a lek on occupied 
summer ranges; 

3) any sagebrush stand on slopes 
<2 percent in defined winter 
concentration areas; and 

4) sagebrush stands on slopes <20 
percent showing evidence of winter 
use. 

Long-term serai or type 
conversions of all aspen, Douglas- 
fir, spruce-fir, and deciduous 
shrub communities should be 
avoided. Where unavoidable, 
special stipulations requiring 
reclamation measures to maintain 
site potential, restore desired 
plant composition, and/or 
accelerate development of the 
community's desired serai stage 
will be applied. Serai 
manipulations of aspen and conifer 
types will be limited to those 
specifically designed to enhance 
or perpetuate stand diversity or 
achieve riparian management 
objectives. Where practical, 
manipulation extent will maintain 
a minimum 50 percent of individual 
stands in mature to over -mature 
age class. 

Disruptive surface use activities 
will be prohibited in the 
following areas during the 
seasonal use periods identified: 

1) winter concentration areas 
(December 16 through March 15); 
and 

2) nesting habitats, when 10% or 
more of suitable nesting habitat 
associated with an individual lek 
is adversely influenced (April 15 
through July 7) . 

Disruptive surface occupation or 
adverse habitat modification 
within 1/4 mile of active 
strutting grounds will be 
prohibited. 



The establishment or augmentation 
of sharp-tailed and ruffed grouse 
could be considered in appropriate 
habitats on a case-by-case basis. 

Implementat i nn • 

Habitat treatment and management 
guidelines will be developed 
during the NEPA planning and 
analysis of individual project 
proposals. Guidelines will be 
integrated within approved 
project design. Grouse habitat 
treatment and management 
objectives will be incorporated 
into the planning and development 
of future activity plans. 

Vegetation treatment widths should 
generally not exceed 200 feet. 
Treatment areas should be 
interspersed with equal or larger 
intervals of suitable cover. 
Cumulative adverse manipulations 
will not be allowed to exceed 10 
percent of suitable nest habitat 
within two miles of a lek. 

Adapted forms of succulent forbs 
should be included in seed mixes 
applied to surface disturbances on 
grouse brood ranges. Seed mixes 
will be subject to reseeding 
conditions established for each 
GRA and identified in Appendix B. 

Comparable or superior varieties 
of sagebrush should be established 
within occupied sage grouse ranges 
in those instances where sagebrush 
conversion or removal has exceeded 
500 acres. The extent and level 
of reestablishment effort will not 
exceed 2 percent of converted 
acreage at mature canopy densities 
of <15 percent. 

Livestock and big game management 
techniques will be used to retain 
>50 percent herbaceous growth by 
weight through September 15, on 
grouse brood and nest habitats. 



Lives tock 



redistribution 



2-32 



Chapter 2 



techniques will be employed to 
defer concentrated use of aspen 
and other special use habitats 
until after mid-August. 

NSO, TL and CSU stipulations will 
be applied, where appropriate, to 
all permitted surface use 
activities through various use 
authorizations and leasing 
processes. These protective 
stipulations will be applied to 
surface use activities associated 
with existing land use 
authorizations as mitigation 
measures or COAs during the NEPA 
process. COAs will not violate 
the exercise of valid existing 
rights. 

A CSU stipulation will be applied 
to all permitted land use 
activities that involve the 
modification of aspen, 
serviceberry and chokecherry 
communities north of Highway 40. 
This will be a means of 
maintaining the distribution, 
condition and functional capacity 
of high priority grouse habitats. 

Exception and modification 
provisions (see Appendix A) 
provide some flexibility in 
implementing the stipulations. 
They also allow site-specific 
tailoring of prescriptions to gain 
effective protection of identified 
values without unnecessarily 
hindering other forms of public 
land use. These provisions 
provide the opportunity to 
integrate new or innovative 
technologies and information to 
better manage, protect, or 
compensate for wildlife related 
values. They will also promote 
the accumulation of information 
necessary to better identify, 
assess, and manage wildlife 
values . 

Fisheries 



Objective ; 

Improve current and potential 
stream fisheries to help increase 
populations of sport and native 
fishes . 

Develop and maintain facilities 
capable of supporting warm-water 
fisheries . 

Increase recreational fishing 
opportunities within the Resource 
Area. 

Management : 

Suitable stream segments that are 
greater than or equal to 1/4 mile 
in length, will have 
riparian/channel conditions 
improved to no less than fair 
condition within 10 Years of 
approval of this Record of 
Decision. 

Acquisition of water rights to 
meet minimum instream flow 
requirements of public land cold 
water fisheries will be pursued in 
cooperation with Colorado Division 
of Wildlife and Colorado Division 
of Water Resources. 

The BLM will strive to secure 
public access to landlocked BLM 
Land fisheries that exceed 1/2 
mile in length and are >1.5 miles 
from vehicular access. 

Acquisition of aquatic habitats 
with existing or potential public 
fisheries values will be pursued 
through the exchange process with 
willing landowners. 

Implementation: 

Impacts to stream fishery 
conditions will be assessed and 
identified during individual NEPA- 
related project analysis. 
Unavoidable short-term 
deterioration of stream conditions 
will be minimized through 
application of site specific 
mitigating measures and/or COAs 



2-33 



Resource Decisions 



identified in Appendix B. 

Stream habitat treatment, 
maintenance, and improvement will 
also be achieved by formulating 
protection and enhancement 
measures through the NEPA analysis 
process associated with 
development of integrated activity 
plans, or amendments to existing 
activity plans . 

Impoundments offering conditions 
suitable for pond fisheries will 
have aquatic conditions enhanced, 
where appropriate, by: 

1) controlling excessive aquatic 
plant growth; 

2) establishing desirable 
shoreline vegetation; 

3) restoring reservoir depth; 
and/or 

4) controlling sediment input. 
Special Status Species 

Objectives 

Increase special status species 
populations (Black footed ferret, 
Bald eagle, and Colorado River 
cutthroat trout) , and the suitable 
extent and/or utility of their 
habitats on public lands in an 
effort to ultimately remove these 
species from special status 
consideration (See Appendix C, 
Standard Four) . 

Ensure that federally authorized 
actions do not adversely disrupt 
or compromise important biological 
activities or contribute to 
increased mortality or depressed 
production or recruitment into a 
breeding population. 

Maintain or improve bank, channel 
and floodplain processes 
associated with designated 
critical habitats for listed and 



candidate fishes of the Upper 
Colorado River Basin. 

Management : Black-footed ferret 

Black-footed ferret recovery areas 
will be designated on 52,050 acres 
of BLM-administered surface in the 
Lower Wolf Creek drainage and 
6,740 acres of BLM-administered 
surface in Coyote Basin. 
Designated recovery areas will be 
available for the reestablishment 
of viable black-footed ferret 
populations . 

Land use actions on federal lands 
that affect the overall extent or 
distribution of prairie dog 
ecosystems, or that alter the 
effective continuity or general 
densities of prairie dogs within 
prairie dog complexes, will be 
allowed as long as the integrity 
of prairie dog ecosystems for 
associated species will be 
maintained. 

Prairie dog complexes located 
outside the designated recovery 
areas will be available as habitat 
for ferret dispersal and 
colonization provided conflicts 
with valid existing rights are 
reconciled. 

Implementation: Black footed 
ferret 

The direct reintroduction of 
black-footed ferrets will be 
contingent on a final habitat 
suitability analysis and the 
successful development of a ferret 
reintroduction and management 
plan. Plan development will 
involve the mutual and cooperative 
efforts of all affected stake- 
holders (e.g. affected landowners 
and land use interests). These 
areas are depicted on Map 2-17. 

BLM lands within these designated 
ferret recovery areas will be 
managed to enhance black-footed 
ferret survival and recruitment, 



2-34 



Chapter 2 



and geared toward maintaining or 
enhancing the capability of the 
sites to achieve ferret recovery 
objectives. 

Motorized vehicle use in ferret 
recovery areas will be limited to 
existing roads and trails prior to 
development of a travel management 
plan. Development of a travel 
management or integrated activity 
plan will implement effective road 
and trail density goals of 1.5 
miles per square mile within the 
ferret recovery areas . 

Subsequent approval of the 
reintroduction plan may supersede 
or modify certain land use 
decisions and objectives included 
in this RMP. 

Conservation measures necessary to 
avoid black-footed ferret 
mortality and maintaining or 
enhancing habitat suitability in 
prairie dog habitats lying outside 
designated ferret recovery areas 
will be provided through lease 
notices, mitigation measures, or 
COAs attached to permitted uses. 

Predator control agreements within 
these areas will be stipulated to 
preclude losses of nontarget 
wildlife, including black-footed 
ferret. 

Management: Bald Eagle 
Mature cottonwood canopies 
suitable for bald eagle roost, 
perch, and nest substrate will be 
developed or maintained. 

Federal land actions within the 
White River ACEC will be conducted 
in a manner consistent with the 
maintenance or enhancement of bald 
eagle riverine habitat suitability 
and utility. 

Riverine habitats along the White 
River that possess high potential 
for cottonwood "potential natural 



community" as bald eagle nest and 
roost substrate will be given a 
high priority for possible 
acquisition from willing land 
owners . 



Implementation: Bald Eagle 
Disruptive forms of permitted land 
uses that will occur within 1/2 
mile of identified winter roosts 
and concentration areas and active 
nest sites during respective use 
periods, will not be allowed. No 
surface occupancy stipulations 
will be applied to areas within 
1/4 mile of functional nest sites 
and identified winter roosts and 
concentration areas. 
Authorized surface disturbance or 
use within the White River ACEC 
will be contingent on the 
following conditions: 

1) mature and regenerating 
cottonwood communities will be 
avoided; 

2) special reclamation techniques 
will be required to accelerate 
recovery and/or reestablishment of 
habitat commensurate with 
deterioration; 

3) long-term site potential as a 
properly functioning riverine 
riparian community will be 
maintained or restored; and 

4) short and long term utility as 
bald eagle habitat will be 
maintained. 

Management : Colorado River 
cutthroat trout 

Channel and riparian conditions on 
streams occupied by Colorado River 
cutthroat trout will be improved 
from poor to fair condition 
within five years, and to good 
condition within 10 years of 
approval of this Record of 
Decision. 



2-35 



Resource Decisions 



BLM authorized land uses that 
adversely affect long term 
riparian, channel, or aquatic 
conditions associated with 
Colorado River cutthroat trout 
fisheries will be prohibited. 

A 47,610-acre ACEC is established 
on that portion of the East 
Douglas Creek watershed 
encompassing 90 percent of the 
Resource Area's BLM-administered 
Colorado River cutthroat trout 
fisheries . 

Acquisition of water rights 
necessary to meet minimum instream 
flow requirements of Colorado 
River cutthroat trout will be 
pursued in cooperation with the 
state. 

Stream habitats suitable as 
Colorado River cutthroat trout 
fisheries will be given a high 
priority for possible acquisition 
through exchange from willing 
surface owners. 

Implementation: Colorado River 
cutthroat trout 

Stream condition will be 
determined using the Riparian 
Ecosystem Scorecard evaluation 
system or its equivalent. 
Management in these areas will 
emphasize vegetatively-derived 
bank stability and woody riparian 
development. This emphasis will 
be applicable to about 15 miles of 
stream in the East Douglas, 
Trapper's, and Big Beaver Creek 
drainages . 

The East Douglas Creek ACEC will 
serve to coordinate all land uses 
in a manner compatible with or 
complementary to stream habitat 
recovery. 

Development of a travel management 
plan or integrated activity plan 
will include the establishment of 
an effective road density limit of 



1.5 miles per square mile within 
the East Douglas ACEC. Site 
specific ACEC management will be 
identified through development of 
an integrated activity plan. 

Management objectives specifically 
directed at improving riverine 
habitats will be achieved 
primarily through: 

1) modified livestock grazing 
practices ; 

2) installation of limited fencing 
and in-stream structures; 

3) reestablishment of riparian 
vegetation; 

4) controlling beaver populations; 

5) upland vegetation treatments 
(see Table 2-19 in DRMP) ; 

6) increasing the availability of 
upland livestock waters,- 

7) modification of project designs 
or facility locations; and 

8) imposing special reclamation 
techniques as mitigation measures 
or COAs on surface disturbing 
activities . 

Implementation: Special Status 
Species (General) 

BLM will continue to consult with 
the USFWS on federally authorized 
actions that may affect listed or 
proposed threatened or endangered 
species. Project-specific 
conservation measures derived 
through the consultation process 
will be applied to BLM-permitted 
actions as COAs through BLM's 
various permitting processes. 

NSO, TL and CSU stipulations 
associated with black-footed 
ferret, bald eagle, Colorado River 
cutthroat trout, ferruginous hawk, 
and northern goshawk (see Appendix 



2-36 



Chapter 2 



A) , will be applied, where 
appropriate, to all use 
authorizations and leasing 
processes. These protective 
stipulations will also be applied 
on a case-by-case basis during the 
NEPA process to surface use 
activities associated with 
existing land use authorizations 
as mitigation measures or COAs . 

Exception and modification 
provisions (see Appendix A) 
provide some flexibility in 
implementing the stipulations. 
This also allows site-specific 
tailoring of prescriptions to gain 
effective protection of identified 
values without unnecessarily 
hindering other forms of public 
land use. These provisions 
provide an opportunity to 
integrate new or innovative 
technologies and information, in 
an effort to better manage, 
protect, or compensate for 
wildlife related values. They 
will also promote the accumulation 
of information necessary to better 
identify, assess, and manage 
wildlife values. 

Habitat treatment guidelines and 
improvement objectives will be 
applied during NEPA planning and 
analysis of individual project 

proposals . 

BLM projects will normally be 
implemented through approved 
activity plans. Special status 
species habitat treatment and 
management objectives will be 
incorporated into the planning and 
development of these plans, and 
integrated with other resource 
management concerns. The 
management of important habitat 
features and components associated 
with candidate and BLM sensitive 
species that are not specifically 
addressed (e.g. sharp-tailed 
grouse, loggerhead shrike, 
candidate non-game fishes) will be 



considered during the NEPA process 
or during the activity plan 
process . 

Road density objectives, where 



appropriate 

wildlife 

implemented 

Management 

activity 



to fishery and 

issues, will be 

through a Travel 

Plan or integrated 

plans developed 



subsequent to this RMP. 
WILDERNESS 

Objective ; 

Manage Wilderness Study Areas 
(WSA) to avoid impairment of 
suitability characteristics until 
designated as wilderness or 
released for other uses. Manage 
designated wilderness areas to 
preserve ecosystems and wilderness 
qualities in perpetuity. 

Management: 

Six Wilderness Study Areas (Bull 
Canyon, Willow Creek, Skull Creek, 
Oil Spring Mountain, Windy Gulch 
and Black Mountain) and the 
proposed additions to the WSAs 
(81,190 acres) will be managed 
under the Interim Management 
Policy For Lands Under Wilderness 
Review (See Map 2-18) . Except for 
certain valid existing rights, 
activities will not be allowed to 
occur in WSAs that will impair 
wilderness values or the area's 
suitability for preservation as 
wilderness . 

The boundaries of Bull Canyon, 
Willow Creek, and Skull Creek WSAs 
will be modified as shown in the 
Craig District Wilderness Study 
Report (BLM 1991) . These three 
areas were recommended to the 
Congress to be carried forward as 
wilderness . 

The recommendation to the Congress 
for Black Mountain, Oil Spring 
Mountain, and Windy Gulch WSAs was 
that the areas not be carried 



2-37 



Resource Decisions 



forward as wilderness. 

Implementation ; 

Valid existing rights such as 
grazing, mining, and mineral lease 
activities that existed when flpma 
was approved on October 21, 1976, 
may continue in the same manner 
and degree as on that date, even 
if the use would impair wilderness 
suitability. 

Projects proposed within WSAs will 
be analyzed to determine if the 
action will impair the suitability 
of such areas for wilderness 
designation. with the exception 
of valid existing rights, projects 
that impair wilderness values will 
be denied. Projects that enhance 
wilderness values may be 
considered with appropriate 
stipulations. 

Except for permitted uses, WSAs 
will be closed to motorize vehicle 
travel . 

Motorized vehicle travel, in areas 
released to multiple use by 
Congress, will be limited to 
designated roads and trails. 
Other land management practices 
may be allowed, including 
prescribed fire and wildlife 
habitat enhancement projects. The 
landscape will be managed as VRM 
Class II. 

If Congress releases the Black 
Mountain/Windy Gulch areas from 
further wilderness review, they 
will again become available for 
multiple use management. 

Oil Spring Mountain, Bull Canyon, 
Willow Creek and Skull Creek areas 
will be designated as ACECs if 
Congress releases these areas to 
multiple use management. 

A wilderness management plan will 
be written for each area 
designated as wilderness. 



Designated wilderness areas will 
be managed under the provisions of 
the Wilderness Ace to preserve 
wilderness character and provide 
for the public purposes of 
recreational, scenic, scientific, 
educational, conservation, and 
historical use. 



WILD AND SCENIC RIVERS 

Objective : 

Determine the eligibility and 
suitability of river and stream 
segments for Wild and Scenic River 
(WSR) designation under the Wild 
and Scenic Rivers Act. 

Management: 

Eight river and stream corridors 
were found to be eligible for 
consideration under the WSR Act. 

None of the eight eligible river 
and stream segments were 
recommended as suitable for wild 
and scenic river designation. 

Implementation: 

All river and stream segments in 
the White River Resource Area will 
be dropped from further 
consideration and management as 
WSRs following the signing of the 
this Record of Decision. 

Except as outlined below, no 
special management has been 
identified to protect WSR 
qualities for the eight eligible 
river and stream segments. 

The BLM lands along the White 
River and the Cathedral Creek 
complex will be included in ACECs. 

Threatened and endangered fish 
species will be protected in all 
river and stream segments as 
mandated by the Endangered Species 
Act. 

VISUAL RESOURCES 



2-38 



Chapter 2 



Objective: 

Manage public lands in a manner 
that will maintain the quality of 
scenic and visual resources. 

Management: 

Visual resource management (VRM) 

classes will be assigned to the 

various landscapes in the resource 

area. 

Imp 1 ement a r. i on ; 

VRM classifications correspond to 

the management objectives in an 

area and indicate the level of 

acceptable change that could occur 

within the class. Class I is the 

most restrictive. The VRM classes 

are shown on Map 2-19. 

The following is a list of the 
number of acres within each class: 

Class I 39,390 acres 

Class II 412,250 acres 

Class III 861,680 acres 

Class IV 146,100 acres 

Within each classification, 
management actions or projects 
should repeat the basic elements 
of line, form, color, and texture 
to help them maintain the VRM 
class or level of change to the 
landscape. 

Visual resource management classes 
will become effective upon 
signature of this Record of 
Decision. 

Proposed management actions and 
projects will be evaluated for 
consistency with VRM 
classification objectives. 
Management actions and projects 
that would noticeably change the 
characteristic of the more 
sensitive landscapes would either 
be modified to blend in with the 
that landscape, denied, or moved 
to another more suitable location. 

Stipulations or other management 



actions will be developed through 
environmental analysis and placed 
on approvals to mitigate the 
visual resource. 

The areas of primary concern and 
focus will be the areas having 
sensitive landscapes such as: 1) 
all VRM Class I and II areas; 
Canyon Pintado NHD; and 
corridors along highways 13, 
64, and 139. 



2) 

3) 

40, 



AREAS OF CRITICAL 
ENVIRONMENTAL CONCERN 

Objective: 

Designate and protect areas that 
contain important historic, 
cultural, scenic and natural 
values as Areas of Critical 
Environmental Concern (ACECs) . 

Management : 

A total of seventeen ACECs, 
encompassing 99,120 acres, will be 
designated as shown in Table 2-14 
in Appendix D. Map 2-2 displays 
the locations of the ACECs. 

The genetic integrity of native 
species in ACECs and RVAs will be 
maintained. 

Maintain environmental quality to 
prevent undue degradation to the 
values that make the site or 
locale unique. 

Allow for multiple uses of ACECs 
within the context of maintaining 
special values in the ACECs. 

Manage ACECs in cooperation with 
interested agencies, landowners, 
and other parties to prevent 
degradation of the special values 
in the ACECs. 

Implementation ; 

Surface stipulations will be 
applied to each ACEC (see Appendix 
A) to protect the resource(s) of 



2-39 



Resource Decisions 



concern for which the ACEC was 
designated. The stipulations will 
be either controlled surface use, 
no surface occupancy, or 
combinations of both. 

ACEC designations will become 
effective upon signature of this 
Record of Decision. 

Site specific management of ACECs 
will be developed in individual 
activity plans. 

Existing ACEC activity plans 
(Dudley Bluffs, South Cathedral 
Bluffs, and Raven Ridge) will be 
revised to be consistent with 
decisions contained in the 
approved RMP. 

As integrated activity plans are 
initiated, ACECs occurring within 
those plan areas will be 
incorporated into that activity 
plan process. The integrated 
activity plan will then replace 
the need for an individual ACEC 
activity plan. 

Reclamation of surface disturbance 
resulting from authorized 
activities within ACECs and RVAs 
shall use only locally gathered, 
or genetic stock from locally 
gathered, native species. In 
those cases where locally gathered 
native species are not available, 
the impact of using non-local 
native species on the genetic 
integrity of the ACECs and RVAs 
must be analyzed and mitigated 
through a site specific 
environmental analysis. 

RECREATION 

Objective: 

Provide a broad spectrum and 
diversity of recreation 
opportunities to meet expected 
demand by: 1) providing services 
to the visiting public; 2) 



maintaining high quality 
facilities to meet public needs 
and demand; and 3) improving 
public understanding and support 
of BLM programs through 
communication and partnerships. 

Management ; 

The entire Resource Area will be 
managed as the White River 
Extensive Recreation Management 
Area (ERMA) . 

No Special Recreation Management 
Areas (SRMA) will be identified. 

The Blue Mountain Geographic 
Reference Area (GRA) and the White 
River ACEC will be managed to 
provide specific recreation 
activity opportunities and 
physical, social, and managerial 
settings for targeted recreation 
experiences . 

Implementation: 

The White River ERMA will be 
managed custodially to provide an 
unstructured recreational 
opportunity. Certain management 
actions and objectives will be 
applied in the ERMA. A diversity 
of outdoor recreation 
opportunities and activities, with 
resulting experiences and benefits 
will be maintained and protected. 

The ERMA delineation would become 
effective upon signature of this 
Record of Decision. Specific 
management of the ERMA will be 
included in individual project 
plans or in integrated activity 
plans written following 
publication of the approved RMP. 
An environmental assessment will 
be prepared for each project plan 
or integrated activity plan. 

Map 2-21 shows recreation 
opportunity spectrum (ROS) 
management classes that will be 
maintained in the Blue Mountain 
GRA and White River ACEC. 



2-40 



Chapter 2 



Targeted activities, settings, 
experiences and major management 
actions for the Blue Mountain and 
White River Areas are listed 
below: 

Blue Mountain GRA (North) 
Targeted Activities: Trophy big 
game and upland bird hunting ; 
mountain biking; scenic viewing; 
horseback riding; pleasure 
driving; and wildlife viewing. 

Settings to be Maintained: 

1) Physical: Semi-primitive non- 
motorized (SPNM), semi-primitive 
motorized (SPM) , roaded natural 

(RN) , rural (R) ; 2) Social: SPNM, 
SPM, RN; and 3) Managerial: SPNM, 
SPM, RN 

Benefits /Experiences : Manage to 
provide experiences and benefits 
related to: 1) individual - 
cultural/historical/rural 
lifestyle learning, quality of 
life/satisfaction, and challenge; 

2) socio-cultural - environmental 
sensitivity; 3) economic - local 
and regional economic 
growth/stability; and 4) 
environmental - enhanced 
environmental ethic. 

Major Management Actions: Acquire 
access and key inholdings; manage 
as VRM Class II; encourage private 
sector development of a 30-50 unit 
tent campground somewhere along 
Harper's Corner Road or develop 
camping facilities in partnership 
with DNM; accommodate RV camping 
in town of Dinosaur; identify and 
develop mountain bike routes; 
pursue a scenic byway partnership. 

Blue Mountain GRA (South) 

Targeted Activities: Wilderness 
hiking and backpacking; trophy big 
game and upland bird hunting; 
mountain biking; scenic viewing; 
horseback riding; pleasure 
driving; and wildlife viewing. 



Settings to be Maintained: 
1) Physical - SPNM, SPM, RN, R; 2) 
Social - P, SPNM, SPM, RN, R; 3) 
Managerial - P, SPNM, SPM, RN 

Benefits/Experiences: Manage to 
provide experiences and benefits 
related to: 1) Individual 
tranquility, solitude, nature and 
cultural learning, physical health 
and maintenance, sense of 
adventure, aesthetic appreciation, 
and challenge; 2) Socio-cultural - 
environmental sensitivity; 3) 
Economic - local economic 
growth/stability; and 4) 
Environmental - enhanced 
environmental ethic. 

Major Management Actions: Acquire 
WSA access and key inholdings; 
manage as VRM Classes I and II; 
encourage private sector 
development of a 3 0-50 unit tent 
campground somewhere along Harpers 
Corner Road or develop camp 
facilities in partnership with 
DNM; accommodate RV camping in 
town of Dinosaur; allow low impact 
recreational camping from June 15 
through August 15 in the Moosehead 
Mountain road closure area; 
designate/develop mountain bike 
routes connecting to Yampa Valley 
Trail in DNM, Harper's Corner Road 
to Town of Dinosaur, and Moosehead 
Mountain to Skull Creek Rim. 

White River ACEC (Meeker to Kenny 
Reservoir) 

Targeted Activities: River 
floatboating (open canoeing) , 

fishing, and camping. 

Settings to be Maintained: 1) 
Physical - RN, R; 2) Social - RN; 
3) Managerial - RN 

Benefits /Experiences: Manage to 
provide experiences and benefits 
related to: 1) Individual 
cultural/historical/rural 
lifestyle, quality of 



2-41 



Resource Decisions 



life/satisfaction, family 
orientation; 2) Socio-cultu.ral - 
environmental sensitivity; 3) 
Economic - local and regional 
economic growth/stability, and 4) 
Environmental - enhanced 
environmental ethic. 

Major Management Actions: Provide 
river access; retain BLM lands; 
establish launch sites/parking and 
interpretive facilities; allow 
camping only in designated sites 
(sites to be determined when 
developing integrated activity 
plans) ; provide user ethics and 
information; monitor use; VRM 
Class II. 

White River ACEC (Kenny Reservoir 
to Shavetail Bridge) 

Targeted Activities: Open 
canoeing, cold- and warm-water 
fishing, and camping. 

Settings to be Maintained: 1) 
Physical - R, MU; 2) Social - RN; 
3) Managerial - RN 

Benefits/Experiences: Manage to 
provide experiences and benefits 
related to: 1) individual- 
cultural/historical/rural 
lifestyle, quality of 
life/satisfaction, family 
orientation; 2) socio-cultural- 
environmental sensitivity; 3) 
economic - local and regional 
economic growth/stability, and 4) 
environmental - enhanced 
environmental ethic. 

Major Management Actions: 
Provide river access; retain BLM 
lands; establish launch 
sites /parking and interpretive 
facilities; allow camping only in 
designated sites (sites to be 
determined when developing RAMPs 
or integrated activity plans) ,- 
develop watchable wildlife sites 
and trails at Kenny Reservoir in 
partnership with others; develop 



rock art interpretive site at 
reservoir; develop boat 
launch/parking above Shavetail 
Bridge; monitor river use; provide 
user ethics and information; VRM 
Class II. 

White River ACEC (Shavetail Bridge 
to Utah Border) 

Targeted Activities: River 
f loatboating, open canoeing, warm- 
and cold-water fishing, and 
camping. 

Settings to be Maintained: 1) 
Physical - SPM; 2) Social - SPNM; 
and 3) Managerial - SPNM. 

Benefits/Experiences: manage to 
provide experiences /benefits 
related to: 1) Individual 
independence, tranquility, 
solitude, scenery; 2) Socio- 
cultural - environmental 
awareness /sensitivity; 3) Economic 
local and regional economic 
growth/stability; and 4) 
Environmental - enhanced 
environmental ethic. 

Major Management Actions: acquire 
shoreline tracts; manage for VRM 
Class II; retain existing BLM 
public lands; monitor river use; 
provide user ethics and 
information; encourage private 
sector development of canoe livery 
and shuttle service; camping only 
in designated sites (sites to be 
designated when developing 
integrated activity plans) ; 
coordinate management with Utah 
BLM. 

Recreation information will be 
provided to the public through 
maps, brochures, publications or 
other means to ensure public 
awareness of available recreation 
opportunities, to promote public 
health and safety, prevent 
resource deterioration by 
promoting user ethics, and 



2-42 



Chapter 2 



mitigating conflicts. Locations 
of access, recreation 
opportunities, management 
objectives, safety concerns, user 
ethics, interpretive sites, 
educational, and other information 
will be highlighted in 
publications or provided through 
other means. A signing plan will 
be completed, implemented and 
maintained to identify public 
lands, provide direction, identify 
safety concerns, interpretation 
and information. 

Securing public access to public 
lands will be a priority where 
demand, recreational values, and 
sufficient size warrants legal 
and/or physical access. This 
access would be acquired through 
easement, agreement, exchange or 
other means. 

Lands may be identified for 
possible acquisition where: 1) 
there is high demand for highly 
valued recreation opportunities, 
2) key areas are needed to block 
public lands for management 
purposes, 3) to mitigate 
conflicts, 4) recreation 
development may occur such as 
trailheads, boat launch sites, 
camp areas, interpretive sites, 
and 5) the area of interest 
contains willing sellers. 

Facilities will be provided and 
maintained to accommodate visitor 
health and safety and allow use of 
public lands resources. Parking 
areas, trailheads, sanitary 
facilities, camp areas, kiosks and 
other limited facilities to 
support trails, interpretative 
sites, and watchable wildlife 
sites will be developed in 
partnerships with the private 
sector. 

A recreation-tourism community 
partnership (s) will be pursued. 
The purpose of the partnership (s) 



would be to protect natural and 
cultural resources, develop 
recreation resources, and enhance 
local economic growth and 
stability through rural 
recreation/tourism development. 
Partnerships will involve land 
managers, state & local 
governments and interests, the 
tourism industry, other agencies, 
and local interests. 

Special recreation permits (SRPs) 
will be issued to qualified 
commercial guides and outfitters 
based on need and demand for 
services. Use limits or 
allocations will be made based on 
services provided, prior use 
history, responsiveness, and 
proven responsibility of 
applicants. Allocations may also 
be used to resolve conflicts, 
protect resources, or reduce 
impacts to resources, clients and 
other public land users. 
Commercial operations would be 
encouraged to diversify the 
services and opportunities offered 
on the public lands. Permits 
would be issued for competitive 
events and other services as 
required. 

Monitoring of resources and 
visitor use will be conducted to 
ensure protection of sensitive 
resources and continued 
availability of recreation 
opportunities and experiences. 

Picnicking/Camping Sites will be 
developed at Divide Creek 
Reservoir and Peterson Draw 
Reservoir. 

Overnight camping on public lands 
within the Oak Ridge State 
Wildlife Area will be prohibited. 

A cultural resource interpretive 
program will be developed for 
sites in the Canyon Pintado, Duck 
Creek & Colorow Wickiup areas, 



2-43 



Resource Decisions 



Moosehead Mountain ACEC, Dragon 
Trail, and Dripping Rock Cave 
areas, among others. This program 
will be developed in conjunction 
with the cultural resource 
activity. 

Develop watchable wildlife and 
other interpretive sites in 
partnership with other entities 
and as support and demand dictate. 
Develop motorized and non- 
motorized trails (e.g. mountain 
bike, hiking, horseback, ATV, 4- 
wheel drive, snowmobile, etc.) as 
demand/needs dictate. Trails may 
include but are not limited to: 
Rangely Loop, Dinosaur, Ute, 
Dominguez-Escalante, Scenery 
Gulch, Cathedral Bluffs, and China 
Wall /Lion Canyon/Lobo Mountain 
Trails. Develop links to other 
trails: Yampa Valley Trail, 
Kokopelli's Trail, Uinta Railroad 
into Utah, etc. 

To develop a non-motorized quality 
hunting area, no motorized 
vehicles will be allowed in Cow 
Creek, Timber Gulch and Hay Gulch 
areas from August 15 to November 
30. Vehicle use may be permitted 
during this time for permitted 
purposes . 

MOTORIZED VEHICLE 
TRAVEL 

Objective : 

Manage motorized vehicle travel on 
public lands to provide for public 
need and demand, protect natural 
resources, provide for the safety 
of public land users, and to 
minimize conflicts among various 
users of public lands. 

Management: 

A comprehensive Travel Management 
Plan will be initiated upon 
approval of this document. 

No areas will be designated as 



open to OHV use at this time. 

Winter snowmobile use will remain 
open, except within the Moosehead 
road closure area, Oak Ridge State 
Wildlife Area, and the six 
Wilderness Study Areas. 

Until a Travel Management Plan is 
completed, motorized vehicles will 
be limited to existing roads, ways 
and trails on most of the public 
lands in the Resource Area from 
October 1 through April 3 each 
year (See Map 2-22) . 

Motorized vehicle travel will be 
limited to existing roads, ways 
and trails all year in identified 
fragile soil areas, the black- 
footed ferret reintroduction 
areas, the Texas-Missouri- 
Evacuation Creek cultural resource 
area, and in areas with potential 
habitat for Threatened and 
Endangered or sensitive plant 
species. These overlapping areas 
cover approximately 326,985 acres. 

Motorized vehicle use will be 
limited to designated roads and 
trails in: ACECs, in order to 
protect sensitive resources (See 
Maps 2-23A through 2-23F) ,• the 
Indian Valley/Deep Channel area, 
to comply with a court ruling (See 
Map 2-24); and the Canyon Pintado 
National Historic District, in 
order to protect fragile cultural 
resources (See Map 2-25) . 

The Cow Creek/Timber Gulch/Hay 
Gulch areas (7,390 acres) will be 
closed to motorized vehicle use 
from August 15 through November 30 
each year in order to establish 
non-motorized quality hunting 
areas . 

All six Wilderness Study Areas 
(WSAs) are designated as closed 
until such time that congress 
either designates them as 
wilderness or releases them for 



2-44 



llll IIIHIMIHIIIHIMMIII 



Mawmwma^maaai^mamasi^aum^m^ama^^^mW±L ..:.■.._:.'■:.:■_ ■ 



multiple uses. 

Public Lands in the Moosehead 
Mountain Road Closure Area (6,909 
acres) and Oak Ridge State 
Wildlife Area (2,918 acres) will 
be designated as closed to 
motorized vehicle use to prevent 
damage to watershed resources and 
wildlife habitat. 

The above road designations will 

remain in effect until a site 

specific Travel Management Plan 
can be completed. 

Implement at- i nn • 

The limitation restricting OHV use 
to existing roads and trails from 
October 1 through April 3 is 
necessary to prevent damage to 
soil, water, vegetation, wildlife, 
and other sensitive resources 
during periods when the ground is 
generally wet from rain or snow. 
This_ limitation is also necessary 
to limit the creation of new roads 
and trails in areas that will not 
sustain them. Vehicle use will 
not be restricted in these areas 
outside of this time period (May 
1 through September 30) 
Approximately 922,2 00 acres are 
included within this designation 
Exceptions to this limitation 
during the limited period (October 
1 through April 30) are as 
follows: 

1) Vehicles may be allowed to 
travel up to 3 00 feet from an 
existing road, way or trail to 
park, camp, gather firewood, etc. 
as long as no damage is caused to 
resources ; 

2) hunters may use motorized 
vehicles to retrieve downed big 
game as long as damage to 
resources does not occur; 

3) physically challenged 
individuals (Having DOW permit) 
may be allowed to continue travel 



Chapter 2 

off existing roads and trails 
during the limited months; and 

4) emergencies involving threats 
to life and property. 

WSAs designated as wilderness 
will remain closed to motorized 
vehicle use to prevent damage to 
resources and wilderness values 
within these areas and to comply 
with the Wilderness Act. 

Vehicle use in WSAs released from 
wilderness consideration by 
Congress would be limited to 
designated roads and trails. 

OHV designations will be in effect 
with the signing of this Record of 
Decision. Roads and trails within 
designated areas (WSAs, ACECs and 
other limited or closed areas) 
will have maps prepared for public 
distribution and will be marked on 
the ground with signing. 

A Travel Management Plan will be 
completed using a public process 
that will help determine the 
following: 

1) if and where roads and trails 
will be closed; 

2) identify public needs such as 
construction of motorized or 
nonmotorized trails; and 

3) determine the need for open 
areas; 

Criteria will be integrated or 
developed in the plan, to help 
achieve established resource 
objectives, such as, stabilizing 
or reducing disruption of big game 
habitat use (i,e., effective road 
density limitations) and 
preventing damage to riparian and 
aquatic habitats. 

All known roads and trails in the 
White River Resource Area will be 



2-45 



Resource Decisions 



entered into a GIS computer data 
base. The data base will then be 
used to help develop the travel 
management plan. 

All roads and trails will be 
numbered during preparation of the 
Travel Management Plan. Numbering 
will be consistent with BLM policy 
and the transportation system. 
The numbered roads and trails and 
the computer data base will be 
updated and maintained on a 
regular basis . 

As proposals for construction of 
new roads or trails are received, 
NEPA documentation will analyze 
impacts and determine appropriate 
designations and the potential for 
replacement of other existing 
roads. Criteria will be developed 
as part of the travel management 
planning process to aid in the 
determination for changing a 
particular area's road and trail 
designations, or adding/ closing 
roads and trails. Any road 
closures will be announced in the 
Federal Register but will not 
require an RMP amendment. 

The following definitions were 
used in this document and will 
also be used in developing the 
Travel Management Plan: 

OPEN: The open designation 
means an area where all types of 
vehicle use is permitted at all 
times, anywhere in the area 
subject to the operating 
regulations and vehicle standards. 

LIMITED: An area designated 
as limited means an area 
restricted at certain times, in 
certain areas, and/or to certain 
vehicular use. These restrictions 
may be of any type, but can 
generally be accommodated within 
the following type of categories: 
numbers of vehicles; types of 
vehicles; time or season of use; 



permitted or licensed use only; 
use on existing or designated 
roads and trails; and other 
restrictions. 

CLOSED: An area designated 
as closed means an area where off- 
highway vehicle use is prohibited. 
Use of OHVs in closed areas may be 
allowed for certain reasons such 
as emergencies and in conjunction 
with other valid resource uses. 
Specific permitted use within 
closed areas shall be subject to 
the approval of the Area Manager. 

ROAD: A road is defined as a 
transportation facility 
constructed and used primarily by 
vehicles having four or more 
wheels, and maintained for regular 
and continuous use. 

WAY: A way is a roadlike 
feature used by vehicles having 
four or more wheels, but not 
declared a road and which receives 
no maintenance to guarantee 
regular and continuous use. A way 
is maintained solely by the 
passage of vehicles. 

TRAIL: A trail is a facility 
that is used primarily for foot 
traffic, beasts -of -burden, ATVs or 
motorcycles, bicycles, and various 
special equipment or machinery 
generally used for individual 
travel. Facilities used by jeep 
or four-wheel drive vehicles are 
classified as roads or ways. 

CULTURAL RESOURCES 

Objective: 

Encourage responsible scientific 

utilization of cultural resources. 

Protect and preserve examples of 
cultural and historical resources 
in accordance with existing laws 
and regulations. 



Develop 



program for the 



2-46 



Ill I III III I ■■■■II half llll 



recreational and educational use 
of cultural resources. 

Manaoempnf • 

All federal undertakings, as 
defined by regulation at 3 6 CFR 
800, shall be subject to review to 
consider cultural resources. 

Designate the Canyon Pintado 
National Register Historic 
District (CPHD) , as an avoidance 
area for major new rights-of-way 
for powerlines, pipelines, roads, 
etc. to protect cultural 
resources . 

Revise the boundaries of CPHD to 
conform to aliquot part legal 
descriptions and the extent of 
known cultural resources. The 
boundary adjustment will be 
consistent with the original 
nomination (See Map 2-25) . 

Establish and implement a 
patrol/protection plan for 
cultural resources occurring 
within 1/2 mile of all designated 
roads and trails, county roads and 
State highways. 

Increase protection of cultural 
resources in the Texas-Missouri- 
Evacuation Creek areas with a 
controlled surface use stipulation 
or conditions of approval to 
control placement of surface 
developments. 

Implementation: 

The cultural review process 
includes a records search and/or 
field inventory, as needed, to 
identify and evaluate any cultural 
resources that may be affected by 
the proposed undertaking. All 
cultural resources identified will 
be evaluated in consultation with 
the State Historic Preservation 
Officer (SHPO) and/or Advisory 
Council on Historic Preservation 
(ACHP) , as appropriate, to 
determine their significance in 



Chapter 2 

American history or prehistory. 
Evaluation criteria are listed at 
36 CFR 60. Consultation shall be 
carried out under the terms of the 
Programmatic Agreement (PA) 
between the SHPO, BLM, and ACHP. 
The PA and 3 6 CFR 800 specify that 
consultation shall be completed 
prior to approving expenditure of 
federal funds or prior to issuing 
any licenses or permits. 

All ground disturbing activities 
outside of existing disturbance 
within the Canyon Pintado National 
Register District will be 
monitored by an approved and 
qualified archaeologist under the 
following conditions: 

1) Activity occurs in the 
vicinity of known resources; 

2) Activity occurs in the 
alluvial bottoms along Douglas 
Creek and its tributaries; and 

3) Activity occurs in deep 
alluvial soils. 

Protect cultural resource values 
in the Texas-Missouri-Evacuation 
Creek area by: 

1) limit OHV use to existing 
roads and trails 

2) designate the area as an 
avoidance area for major new 
rights-of-way for pipelines 
powerlines, etc. 

3) apply Controlled Surface 
Use stipulations to surface 
disturbing actions in the area. 

Continue Cooperative Agreements 
with qualified entities for 
research and/or educational use of 
cultural resources. 



Permits will be required for all 
. t ?if d .? a 55 Y consultants conducting 

Applicants for 



work in the field. 



2-47 



Resource Decisions 



permits must meet the eligibility 
requirements at 4 3 CFR 7.6 and BLM 
manual 8151. 

Permits for excavation shall be 
awarded to applicants meeting 
requirements of 4 3 CFR 7.6 and BLM 
manual 8151. Excavation will only 
be permitted for sites immediately 
threatened by development, that 
are subject to uncontrolled 
vandalism, cannot be preserved in 
place, or are threatened by 
serious natural erosion. All site 
excavations must be performed in 
accordance with an approved plan 
as specified by the Secretary of 
Interior's Standards as published 
in 48 FR 44716 et seq. 

To the maximum extent practicable, 
all materials collected from a 
given site shall be curated 
together at the same facility, 
within the State of Colorado. 

All curation facilities must meet 
regulations for curation of 
Federally owned artifacts as 
published at 36 CFR 79. 

In cooperation with the recreation 
program, develop an interpretation 
and public education program. 

Approximately three acres in and 
around the Duck Creek Wickiup 
Village, listed on the National 
Register of Historic Places, shall 
be protected with a no surface 
occupancy stipulation. 



PALEONTOLOGI CAL 
RESOURCES 

Objective: 

Identify and protect 
scientifically noteworthy 
paleontological resource values 
from indiscriminate loss. 

Make paleontological resources 
available for scientific, 



educational, and appropriate 
recreational purposes. 

Management ; 

A paleontological survey will be 
required on surface disturbing 
activities occurring within Class 
I, fossil bearing formations known 
to contain noteworthy fossils. 

Identify areas suitable for the 
Noncommercial collection of common 
fossils . 

All third party paleontology 
consultants must be permitted to 
conduct work on BLM administered 
lands, in accordance with 
applicable laws and regulations. 

Designate the Black's Gulch fossil 
site as an ACEC to protect 
scientifically important fossil 
resources . 

Designate the Coal Draw 
Paleontological locality/site as 
an ACEC to protect scientifically 
important fossil resources. 

Designate an addition to the 
existing Raven Ridge ACEC as a 
paleontological ACEC to protect 
scientifically important fossil 
resources. 

Implementation: 

Excavation of noteworthy fossils 
shall be by permit only 
(Scientifically noteworthy fossils 
shall include but not necessarily 
be limited to vertebrate fossils 
and any plant or invertebrate 
fossils as determined from the 
appropriate paleontological 
literature and in consultation 
with paleontologists knowledgeable 
about the fossils under 
consideration) . 

Permit applicants must meet 
minimum qualifications as 
specified by the BLM. 



2-48 



Chapter 2 



All collected materials discovered 
during inventory or excavation 
shall be curated in facilities 
that meet the DOT requirements of 
DM 411, and appropriate 
requirements at 36 CFR 79. 

Whenever possible and practical, 
collected materials shall be 
curated at facilities within the 
borders of the State of Colorado. 

Scientifically noteworthy fossil 
bearing formations shall include 
but not necessarily be limited to: 
the Chinle, Glen Canyon, Morrison, 
Cedar Mountain, Mowry Shale, 
Parachute Creek Member of the 
Green River Formation, Wasatch and 
Browns Park Formation. Also, in 
the Rangely area, the Mesaverde 
Group and Uinta Formation are 
noteworthy. Formations or members 
of formations may be added or 
removed from this list as 
additional data become available. 

Excavation permits will be issued 
under authority of the Federal 
Land Policy and Management Act 
(FLPMA) of 1976 to 
paleontologists, museums or 
universities, for scientific and 
educational purposes. 

Class I formations having good, 
safe outcrops likely to produce 
scientifically important fossils 
shall be surface surveyed prior to 
authorizing disturbance. Surveys 
will not be required in Class I 
areas having vertical to near 
vertical (unsafe) slopes, areas of 
soil development and areas covered 
with much vegetation as these 
areas are unlikely to produce 
recoverable fossils. 

Applicants wishing to collect 
common invertebrate fossils in 
areas that may produce vertebrate 
fossils or fossils of scientific 
interest will also need to have a 
valid permit. 



Organizations that charge fees for 
guided tours that take people out 
to collect common invertebrate or 
plant fossils for personal use 
shall be required to have an 
appropriate Special Recreation 
Permit. These organizations shall 
be required to report any 
vertebrate fossils uncovered 
during the course of their 
tour/trips on BLM lands. 

LANDS AND REALTY 

Land Use Authorizations 

Objective : 

To make public lands available for 
the siting of public and private 
facilities through the issuance of 
applicable land use 
authorizations, in a manner that 
provides for reasonable protection 
of other resource values. 

Management: 

Classify public lands as open, 
avoidance, or exclusion for the 
permitting of land use 
authorizations . 

Land use authorizations will be 
denied in exclusion areas, with 
the exception of short-term land 
use permits involving no 
development, and projects that are 
consistent with management 
objectives for the area. 

Designate major right-of-way 
corridors on public lands that 
will meet public, industry, and 
environmental needs . 

Communication site rights-of-way 
will be limited to currently 
occupied sites. An exception may 
be granted for non-commercial, 
private mobile, or microwave 
facilities by pipeline/power 
companies or land management 
entities, in support of their 
primary business, where no 



2-49 



Resource Decisions 



existing site can be shown to meet 
the applicant's needs. The site 
at Moosehead Mountain will not be 
available for additional 
authorizations. 

Unauthorized uses of the public 
lands will be eliminated or 
properly authorized. in all 
cases, the BLM will recover 
monetary considerations and ensure 
adequate rehabilitation of the 
public lands. 

Implementation: 

Applications for land use 
authorizations (e.g. rights-of- 
way, leases, and permits) will be 
considered on a case-by-case 
basis . 

The following areas totaling 
205,740 acres will be classified 
as avoidance areas for the 
permitting of land use 
authorizations: 

-Landslide areas (35,700 acres); 

-lands surrounding raptor nests 
(31,250 acres); 

-sage grouse leks (54 90 acres); 

-bald eagle roost/concentration 
areas (83 acres) ; 

-Deer Gulch ACEC (1810 acres); 

-Lower Greasewood Creek ACEC (210 
acres) ; 

-Dudley Bluffs ACEC (1630 acres); 

-Yanks Gulch/Upper Greasewood 
Creek ACEC (2680 acres) , 

-Ryan Gulch ACEC (1440 acres); 

-White River Riparian ACEC (950 
acres) ; 

-Coal Oil Rim ACEC (3210 acres); 



-Oil Spring Mountain ACEC (18,2 60 
acres) ; 

-East Douglas Creek ACEC (47,610 
acres) ; 

-Duck Creek ACEC (3420 acres); 

-lands supporting BLM sensitive 
plants/RVAs (4520 acres); 

-Harpers Corner Road (2530 acres); 

-Oak Ridge SWA (9300 acres); 

-riparian areas (970 acres) ,- 

-Canyon Pintado National Historic 
District (16,040 acres). 

The following areas, totaling 
107,420 acres, will be classified 
as exclusion areas for land use 
authorizations: 

-Wilderness Study Areas (41,250 
acres) ; 

-South Cathedral Bluffs, and 
Addition (1330 acres); 

-Raven Ridge, and Addition (4 980 
acres) ; 

-Moosehead Mountain (8940 acres); 

-Black's Gulch (800 acres) and 
Coal Draw (1840 acres) 
ACECs ; 

-known habitat for listed and 
candidate plants (1440 
acres) ; 

-potential habitat for 
listed/candidate plants 
(46,840 acres) , 

The remainder of the Resource Area 
(approximately 1,142,740 acres) 
will be considered open for land 
use authorizations. 

Open areas, avoidance areas, and 



2-50 



Chapter 2 



exclusion areas will become 
effective upon signature of the 
approved Record of Decision. 

The following right-of-way 
corridors, which are displayed on 
Map 2-26, will be designated based 
on topography, soils, existing and 
proposed areas with special 
designations, threatened and 
endangered species habitats, 
relative percentages of public 
versus private ownership (these 
corridors are specifically not 
intended as designations of 
private land) , industry input 
(e.g. the 1992 edition of the 
Western Regional Corridor Study) , 
and the degree to which a 
potential corridor is currently 
occupied: 

NATE SPRINGS DRAW: This corridor 
runs from Rangely to US Highway 
40, about half way from Blue 
Mountain to Massadona. It is 
approximately 1 mile wide, and 
will accommodate all linear 
facilities . 

ELK SPRINGS-DINOSAUR: This 
corridor parallels US Highway 40, 
from Elk Springs to the Utah State 
Line. It is approximately 2 miles 
wide, and will accommodate all 
linear facilities. 

BLUE MOUNTAIN-BONANZA: This 
corridor follows the Craig to 
Bonanza 345 kv powerline. It is 
approximately 2 miles wide, and 
will accommodate all linear 
facilities . 

RANGELY -VERNAL : This corridor 
parallels State Highway 64 from 
Rangely to the Utah State Line. 
It is approximately 2 miles wide, 
and will accommodate all linear 
facilities . 

DRAGON TRAIL-ATCHEE RIDGE: This 
corridor follows the route once 
proposed as the Rangely Loop 



segment of the Northwest Pipeline 
Expansion Project. It runs south 
from Rangely, to the vicinity of 
Baxter Pass, is approximately 1 
mile wide, and will accommodate 
all buried linear facilities. 

MEEKER-RANGELY : This corridor 
parallels State Highway 64 from 
Rangely to the east. It is 
approximately 1 mile wide, and 
will accommodate all linear 
facilities . 

HIGHWAY 64 -RYAN GULCH: This 
corridor follows Rio Blanco County 
Roads 122, 24X, and 24. It is 
approximately 1 mile wide, and 
accommodates all buried linear 
facilities . 

COLLINS GULCH SOUTH: This 
corridor runs south from Magnolia 
Camp. It branches, and follows 
the proposed TransColorado, and 
Union Sales routes. It, and each 
fork, are approximately 1 mile 
wide, and accommodates all buried 
linear facilities. 

MAGNOLIA-CASCADE : This corridor 
runs from Magnolia Camp to Cascade 
Gulch. (The segment from Cascade 
Gulch to the head of West Rifle 
Creek has been eliminated. ) It is 
approximately 1 mile wide, and 
accommodates all buried linear 
facilities . 

COLOROW-GREASEWOOD : This corridor 
follows the Uintah Basin Lateral, 
and Rocky Mountain Natural Gas 
pipelines, from the base of 
Colorow Mountain to Magnolia Camp. 
(The segment from Colorow Mountain 
to Price Creek has been 
eliminated.) It is approximately 
1 mile wide, and accommodates all 
buried linear facilities. 

POWELL PARK-MAGNOLIA: This 
corridor runs from Magnolia camp 
to Powell Park. It is 
approximately 1 mile wide, and 



2-51 



Resource Decisions 



accommodates all buried linear 
facilities . 

MEEKER NORTH- This corridor runs 
north from near the east end of 
Powell Park. it is approximately 
l^mile wide, and accommodates all 
linear facilities. 



PARK rANYON-MAONOT.Ta. 



n his 



corridor generally follows the 
Uintah Basin Lateral. it deviates 
at Little Horse Draw to avoid a 
highly congested area. it 
terminates, without including the 
segment across Rabbit Mountain to 
the Utah State Line, in order to 
allow maximum flexibility in 
crossing private land. it is 
approximately 1 mile wide, and 
accommodates all buried linear 
facilities . 

All corridors previously 
designated will be dropped unless 
included above. 

Necessary NEPA documentation will 

be prepared for all applications 

for_ land use authorizations. 

Actions proposed in open areas and 

in designated corridors will 

normally be authorized subject to 

the use of conditions of approval 

(see Appendix B) , all applicable 

surface use stipulations listed in 

Appendix A, and any site specific 

stipulations identified through 

the NEPA process. Development 

will be allowed in avoidance areas 

under these same conditions where 

no feasible alternative can be 

identified. 

Applicants will be encouraged to 
make early contacts for all 
planned actions in order to 
identify preferred routes and 
potential conflicts. 

Land Tenure Adjustments 

Objective: 

To provide for adjustments in land 



ownership to acquire important 
resources/values, meet local 
needs, resolve unauthorized uses, 
and improve efficiency in public 
and private land management. 

Management : 

Approximately 11,325 acres of 
public land meet the category I 
sale criteria under Section 203 of 
the Federal Land Policy and 
Management Act (FLPMA) . Category 

I lands are suitable for disposal 
by any means, including, but not 
limited to, sale, exchange, or 
jurisdictional transfer. These 
lands are listed by legal 
description in Table 2-15A through 
2-15D, Appendix D. 

Approximately 1,2 82,195 acres of 
public lands not specifically 
identified for disposal or 
retention are designated Category 

II lands. 

Approximately 162,3 80 acres of 
public lands are designated 
Category III lands, not suitable 
for disposal of any kind. 
Category in lands include 
wilderness study areas (WSAs) and 
areas of critical environmental 
concern (ACECs). Category 3 
lands are listed in Table 2-16, 
Appendix D. 

Acquisition of non-Bureau lands 
may be pursued through exchange, 
purchase or donation, where the 
acquisition will serve to enhance 
the BLM's objectives and special 
emphasis programs. For purchase 
or donation, acquisitions will 
generally be limited to inholdings 
within designated areas. 

Implementation : 

Category I Lands. Proposals for 
the disposal of Category 1 lands 
will be considered on a case by 
case basis. while these parcels 
may be sold, exchange will be the 
preferred method of disposal in 



2-52 



most cases. Concerns of adjacent 
owners, current users, and local 
governments will be considered 
prior to disposal. An 
environmental assessment or other 
appropriate NEPA documentation 
will be prepared for all such 
proposals. BLM will not acquire 
private lands near Category 1 
lands . 

Category II Lands. Category n 
lands will be available for 
disposal, on a conditional and 
case-by-case basis, through 
boundary adjustment, state 
indemnity selection, Recreation 
and Public Purposes Act 
applications, or other appropriate 
statutory authority. Where lands 
lie adjacent to those held by 
other^ resource/land management 
agencies, preference will be given 
to transfers to those agencies 
Disposals will not be made under 
Section 2 03 of FLPMA, the Desert 
Land Act, or the General Allotment 
Act. Land disposals or exchanges 
may be considered when the result 
will consolidate ownership, 
improved management of natural 
resources, or serve the public 
interest in a manner consistent 
with the provisions of Section 2 06 
of FLPMA. Specific Category n 
tracts for disposal or exchange 
are not identified. 

Category in Lands. Proposals to 
purchase or exchange BLM lands 
identified as Category in will be 
denied. BLM may pursue purchase 
of private lands near Category III 
lands or consider exchanging 
Category I or Category II BLM 
lands for such private lands. 

Public access rights will be 
reserved on all disposal tracts 
that control access to BLM lands. 

Exchanges involving oil shale or 
other valuable mineral lands will 
be allowed where the public 



Chapter 2 

interest is well served. BLM's 
criteria for Fee Exchange Policy 
for Leasable and Saleable Minerals 
will be used. Exchange proposals 
may proceed where an equal value 
determination is made (see 
analysis in Appendix D) . 

Access Management 

Objective ; 

Enhance access to public lands and 
resources . 

Management : 

Public and/or administrative 
access across private land will be 
identified for acquisition for 
areas having high public resource 
values with limited or no public 
or administrative access. 

Administrative and public access 
will be obtained through 
acquisition of easements, 
acquisition of land through 
exchanges, road construction or 
renovation, or by other 
appropriate means. 

Implementation ; 

Lands identified for public access 

enhancement include: 

1) large blocks of inaccessible 
BLM lands or lands with currently 
limited/restricted public access, 

2) smaller blocks of high demand 
or high interest BLM lands, and 

3) lands that will tie major open 
routes together. Map 2-2 7 shows 
some of the broad areas where: a) 
public access needs to be 
enhanced; b) administrative access 
is needed; or c) both public and 
administrative access is needed. 

The type and degree of access 
acquired will be consistent with 
the management direction for or 
emphasis of, the area to be 
accessed. 



2-53 



Resource Decisions 



These areas are not all inclusive 
however, and access activities may 
take place throughout the Resource 
Area, on a case by case basis, as 
opportunities arise. 

Priorities for acquiring access 
will be identified for all areas 
needing access, generally through 
the transportation planning and 
integrated activity plan process. 
Plans will identify specific 
tracts of land or roads needed for 
public or administrative access. 
All access plans will include 
necessary NEPA documentation. 

Withdrawals 

Objective: 

Eliminate unnecessary segregations 

of public lands. 

Management : 

Recommendations will be made for 
the revocation of all BLM public 
land withdrawals which are no 
longer needed. 

Recommendations will be made to 
continue (as is or modify) 
withdrawals which are still needed 
for the purposes for which the 
original withdrawal was made. 

Implementation: 

Oil Shale ■■ Continue, modify on a 
case by case basis to allow for 
exchanges and other discretionary- 
actions . 

Coal - Revoke in its entirety 
(366, 570 acres) . 

Classification and Multiple Use 
Act - Revoke in its entirety (2340 
acres) . 

Public Water Reserves - Continue 
in its entirety (5480 acres); 
modify on a case by case basis to 
allow for exchanges and other 
discretionary actions. 



Water Power - Continue in their 
entirety (3620 acres). 

Implementation 

BLM lands withdrawn and managed by 
other agencies, which may at some 
future time be returned to BLM 
management will be reviewed at 
that time. Appropriate 
recommendations will be made based 
on a determination of the lands 
suitability for return. 

Recommendations for continuation 
or revocation, will be made 
pursuant to BLM Manual 2355, as 
appropriate. 

Water power and Reservoir 
Management 

Objective: 

Protect and manage eligible 
waterpower/reservoir sites on 
public lands. 

Management : 

Public lands withdrawn as 
waterpower and reservoir resource 
sites will be managed as sites 
suitable for restricted 
management . 

Implementation: 

All lands in the planning area 
which are determined by 
professional engineering 
evaluation to have potential for 
waterpower and reservoir resources 
development are assigned to one of 
three categories: 

1) lands suitable for intensive 
management of waterpower and 
reservoir resources sites, 

2) lands suitable for restricted 
management of waterpower and 
reservoir resources sites, and 

3) lands which are unsuitable for 
management as waterpower and 
reservoir resources sites. 



2-54 



Eligible waterpower and reservoir 
sites will be protected from 
adverse effects to the value of 
the site. 

FIRE 

Obiecti vp- 

Manage fire to protect public 
health, safety and property as 
well as allowing fire to carry out 
important ecological functions. 

Managpmp-nt- • 

Develop suppression priorities, 
identify management restrictions 
and determining appropriate fire 
suppression strategies. 

Utilize prescribed fire, both 
natural and management ignited to 
protect, maintain and enhance 
ecosystems, economic values, and 
multiple use resource management 
programs. 

No wildfire situation will require 
trie unnecessary exposure of 
firefighters and equipment to 
dangerous situations. 

Implementation- 

For wildfire activities, full 

consideration will be given to: 



1) an aggressive 
program; 



fire safety 



2) the least 
public funds 
suppression; 



expenditures of 
for effective 



3) the methods of suppression 
least damaging to resources and 
the environment; and 

4) the integration of cooperative 
suppression actions with other 
agencies or with other qualified 
suppression organizations. 

The following constraints will be 
applied to all fires on public 
lands : 



Chapter 2 

1) Fire lines will be placed 
outside existing riparian areas on 
both intermittent and free flowing 
streams. On streams without 
riparian habitat, the fire lines 
will not be constructed across the 
stream. Blackline will be used as 
fire lines in these areas. 

2) Fire lines will be 
rehabilitated to the satisfaction 
of a designated resource advisor 
Rehabilitation will be designed to 
prevent gully formation and runoff 
collection and to discourage 
animal trailing. Rehabilitation 
will also include water barring, 
the placement of woody material on 
the fire line, seeding and 
recontouring. 

3) Areas within riparian zones 
that have been completely burned 
with an intense fire will be 
reseeded to achieve vegetation 
objectives as identified in the 
vegetation section. 

4) Stream crossing locations will 
be limited to existing roads and 
trails . 



5 ) Burns 
watershed 



in fragile soils and 
areas (see Soils and 
Water sections, this chapter) will 
be reseeded with grass mixtures 
identified in Appendix B. 

6) The use of heavy equipment for 
fire line construction will be 
implemented only upon approval by 
the Area Manager. Prior to fire 
suppression in Canyon Pintado 
Historical District or the Texas 
Creek/Evacuation Creek cultural 
area, the archaeologist will be 
consulted concerning hand line 
construction or base 
location. 



camp 



A new Fire Management Activity 
Plan (FMAP) and environmental 
assessment will be written 
following approval of the RMP 



2-55 



Resource Decisions 



Management priorities and 
restrictions identified above will 
be considered in the development 
of the FMAP. A fire operational 
plan will consider the location of 
natural barriers, historical burn 
scars, hazardous fuel build-up 
areas, and natural and man-made 
features which would be considered 
in determining whether a control, 
confine or contain strategy will 
be employed. The plan will use 
Initial Attack Analysis (IAA) to 
assist fire managers in fire 
budgeting by identifying cost plus 
resource net value changes. The 
FMAP will be reviewed and revised 
on a five year interval unless 
deemed necessary to complete a 
revision in less than five years. 

Prescribed fire will be a tool to 
use to help mitigate fuels and 
hazards and to benefit other 
natural resource programs. 

Prescribed fire, which includes 
both management and natural 
ignition sources, may be used to 
achieve land or resource 
management objectives as defined 
in the prescribed fire plans. 
These fires will be conducted 
under prescription, and in a 
predetermined area that will 
produce the intensity of heat and 
rate of spread required to 
accomplish specific management 
objectives. Prescribed fires will 
be conducted by qualified 
personnel and with a pre-approved 
prescribed fire plan. Prescribed 
fires will be monitored to ensure 
that objectives are achieved and 
the fire would not exceed the 
prescription. 

Approximately 639,573 acres have 
been tentatively identified as 
prescribed natural fire (PNF) area 
(See Map 2-28) . Activity plans 
will identify areas and conditions 
where PNF will be managed to 
achieve resource objectives. 



Prescriptions will be prepared for 
these areas , and natural burning 
will be managed within 
prescription. Burns outside the 
prescription will be suppressed as 
wildfire as per current USDI and 
BLM manual guidance. Prescribed 
burn plans, including NEPA 
documentation, will be approved 
for specific fire dependent 
species and or fuel reduction 
objectives. In all cases, 
management ignited and PNF will 
be monitored to ensure that the 
prescription achieved the 
identified objectives. 

For prescribed burn activities, 
smoke management requirements of 
BLM Manual 7723 will be followed 
to ensure ambient air standards 
are not exceeded. This procedure 
will require obtaining an approved 
open burning permit from the State 
of Colorado Air Quality Board 
prior to implementation. 

Specific operational guidance for 
all fire training, presuppression, 
and suppression activities will be 
provided in an operational plan. 
Operational plans will establish 
specific activity prescriptions to 
meet RMP objectives and the work 
force, equipment, and budget 
requirements identified in the 
FMAP. 

GENERAL IMPLEMENTATION 
SCHEDULE 

The schedule for implementing the 
above decisions will be affected 
by future funding, changing 
program priorities, and/or the 
need for additional site specific 
activity planning. Some of the 
decisions will be implemented or 
become effective immediately 
following approval of the Record 
of Decision (ROD) . Other 
decisions will need to be further 
refined following inventory, 



2-56 



Chapter 2 



monitoring and/or public 
involvement and planning. The 
following schedule is presented as 
a guide for the public and BLM 
personnel responsible for 
implementing the decisions. 

Decisions/actions that will be 
implemented or that will become 
effective immediately following 
the approval of the Record of 
Decision are as follows: 

1) Surface Stipulations 
identified in Appendix A will be 
in effect for new oil and gas 
leases and other surface 
disturbing activities authorized 
on BLM lands; 

2) A computer data base of 
legal descriptions associated with 
the Surface Stipulations 
identified in Appendix A will be 
developed and maintained for use 
by White River and Colorado State 
Office personnel. 

3 ) The eleven proposed Areas 
of Critical Environmental Concern 
(ACEC) designations will become 
effective; 

4) The Extensive Recreation 
Management Area (ERMA) designation 
will become effective; 

5) Interim Off Highway 
Vehicle designations will go into 
effect; 

6) The areas identified as 
open, avoidance, or exclusion for 
Rights-of-way use will become 
effective; and 

7) Corridors for major 
linear rights-of-way will become 
designated or undesignated; 

The following decisions/actions 
will be initiated within one year 
of the ROD approval : 



1) Preparation of integrated 
activity plan(s) on the highest 
priority area(s) identified in the 
Draft RMP; 

2) Inventory sand and 
gravel deposits in the Rangely 
area; 

3) Conduct monitoring to 
determine which rangelands are 
healthy, at risk, and/or not 
functioning properly. 

4) Monitor the Wild Horse 
Herd Management Area Plan; 

5) Conduct ecological site 
inventories on priority areas; 

6) Preparation of a travel 
management plan; and 

7) Preparation of a fire 
management activity plan and 
environmental assessment; 

Decisions that will be implemented 
within five years of the ROD 
approval include: 

1) Development of integrated 
activity plan decisions on up to 
two areas ; 

2) Process remaining oil 
shale mining claims to patent or 
contest; 

3) Monitoring the 
effectiveness of mitigation 
applied to surface disturbing 
activities; 

4) Development of plans for 
improving riparian condition for 
areas outside integrated activity 
plan areas; 

5) Monitoring of the Wild 
Horse Herd Management Area; 

6) Improve stream 
riparian/ channel conditions to 



2-57 



Resource Decisions 



fair condition for identified 
Colorado River Cutthroat trout 
fisheries ; 

7) Development of plans for 
management of ACECs outside 
integrated activity plan areas; 
and 



8) Development of travel 
management plan decisions, 
including signing and preparation 
of maps . 

Decisions/actions that would be 
implemented within ten years 
following approval of the ROD 
include : 



1) Develop and implement 
activity plans prescribing grazing 
management activities for all 
allotments in the 
category. 



improve 



2) All wild horses will be 
removed from the North Piceance 
and West Douglas Herd Areas. 

3) Fishery stream segments 
that are greater than or equal to 
1/4 mile in length will have 
riparian and channel condition 
improved or maintained to no less 
than fair condition. 

4) Poor and fair condition 
aquatic habitats occupied by 
Colorado River cutthroat trout 
will be improved to good 
condition . 



2-58 



RESOURCE MAPS 



MAP 2-1 FRAGILE WATERSHEDS IDENTIFIED FOR 
PROTECTION /TREA TMENT 





M 



O'iat 



Sou 



Bianco 



95' 



Rio Jlanco County 



ield County 



Red Wash 



i ' I i I i; i i 



i niii 



Stinking Water 
Wolf Creek 
Crooked Wash 
Blacks Gulch 

Smith Creek 
Spring Creek 

Douglas Creek 

Cottonwood Creek 

Evacuation Creek 




IB Miles 



1:500000 



MAP ?_7 



MAP 2-2 NO LEASE AREAS 

ON BLM AND SPLIT ESTATE LANDS 




No Lease (Recommended for Wilderness Designation) 



No Lease (Not recommended for Wilderness Designation 
-Available tor Leasing Following Release from Wilderness 
Consideration) 

No Lease (National Park Service Scenic Easement) 




12 



16 Miles 



1:500000 



MAP 2-2 



MAP 2-3 NO SURFACE OCCUPANCY STIPULATIONS 
ON BLM AND SPLIT ESTATE LANDS 




Land With No Surface Occupancy Stipulation 




12 



IB Mllaa 



1:500000 



MAP 2-3 



MAP 2-4 TIMING LIMITATIONS 

ON BLM AND SPLIT ESTATE LANDS 




Land With Timing Limitations 




1:500000 



MA P 1_J 



MAP 2-5 CONTROLLED SURFACE USE 
ON BLM AND SPLIT ESTATE LANDS 




Land with Controlled Surface Use Stipulation 




12 



IB Mil* 



1:500000 



MAP 2-5 



MAP 2-6 LANDS AVAILABLE FOR 

OIL SHALE LEASING AND DEVELOPMENT 




Existing Oil Shale Leases 



Available for Multi-Mineral Leasing Only 

I Available for Open Pit Oil Shale Leasing 

II Available for Underground Oil Shale Leasing 




12 



18 Miles 



1:500000 



MAP 9-6 



MAP 2-7 LANDS AVAILABLE FOR 
SODIUM LEASING AND DEVELOPMENT 




Existing Sodium Leases 



Available for Multi-Mineral Leasing Only 



Available for Sodium Leasing 




12 



IB Mtel 



1:500000 



MAP 2-7 



MAP 2-8 WEED-FREE ZONES 

ON BLM AND SPLIT ESTATE LANDS 




Weed-Free Zones 




6 12 



IB Miles 



1:500000 



MAP 2-8 



MAP 2-9 ALLOTMENT CATEGORIZATION 




^tUl Maintenance Allotment 



HH Custodial Allotment 



Intensive Allotment 



Intensive Allotment with AMP Completed 



Allotment Managed by Adjacent Resource Area 
Non-Alloted Lands 




1:500000 



12 



16 Miles 



MAP 2-9 



MAP 2-10 WILD HORSE HERD MANAGEMENT 
AREAS (HMAs) AND HERD AREAS (HAs) 




North Piceance HA 



Piceance/East Douglas HMA 



West Douglas HA 




6 12 



1:500000 



18 Mtes 



MAP 2- JO 



MAP 2-11 MULE DEER WINTER RANGES 




Severe Winter Range/Critical Habitat 



Severe Winter Range 



Winter Concentration Areas 






'j Winter Range 




18 Mites 



1:500000 



MAP 2-11 



MAP 2-12 ELK WINTER RANGES 




Winter Range 




Severe Winter Range 



Winter Concentration Area 



Severe Winter Range/Critical Habitat 




1:500000 



18 Mltei 



MAP 1-11 



MAP 2-13 PRONGHORN ANTELOPE 
SEASONAL RANGES 



Winter Range 



l';Sw> Resident Population 



Overall Range 




12 



16 Mtku 



1:500000 



MAP 2-13 



MAP 2-14 MULE DEER SUMMER RANGES 




Summer Range 



mmi Summer Range/Critical Habitat 




12 



IS Miles 



1:500000 



MAP 2-L 



MAP 2-15 ELK SUMMER RANGES 




! -1 






Exclusion Area 

Production Area/Critcal Habitat 

Summer Range 

Summer Range/Critical Habitat 




IB Miles 



1:500000 



MA P 1.1 ' 



¥t££ 16 SAGE GR °USE SEASONAL 
RANGE 




Overall Range 



MH§^ Production Area 



'///A Winter Range 



Brood Range 




12 



18 Mites 



1:500000 



MAP 2-U 



MAP 2-17 PRAIRIE DOG DISTRIBUTION & POTENT!/ 
BLACK-FOOTED FERRET REINTRODUCTION AREAS 



T4N 



DINOSAUR 









/V 


F 


— -• 


^ 




<B 


>- 


■*v, "* 








V.< 






























r'i ■ -* 


fa 


— 






/-%%?; 


-T^ 7 
















¥??H 


? ; 5c?a *':; 


m,' 


K' 




^S*. H 




::£; 






~*^*^JiL 




-5:~ 


~ 


i 




$$£ VJ: 


^ 






«4w 


* <■ ■. J^jj j 


- 'Ul 








p^rj. Moffat Couhty 



'TIN 



104V/ 1J^W 



T1S 



T2S 



T3S 



i£2W U 101W 



Rio Blanco County 



100W 




\L 



Potential Ferret Reintroduction Areas 



Prairie Dog Distribution 




12 IB Miles 



1:500000 



MAP 2-17 



MAP 2-18 WILDERNESS STUDY AREAS 




WSA Recommended fo Wilderness 



WSA not Recommended for Wilderness 



Private Inholding 




1:500000 



12 



16 Mites 



MAP 2-18 



MAP 2-19 VISUAL RESOURCE 
MANAGEMENT CLASSIFICATIONS 




1 





VRM Classl 
VRM Class 2 

VRM Class 3 
VRM Class 4 




12 



1:500000 



MAP 2-19 



MAP 2-20 AREAS OF CRITICAL ENVIRONMENTAL 
CONCERN viKULVMtwiAL 




'.'■■'■■' ■;:.■> '■ -J 

'- /-..\ Areas of Critical Environmental concern 




6 12 



16 Miles 



1:500000 



MAP 2-21 



MAP 2-21 RECREATIONAL OPPORTUNITY SPECTRUM (ROS) 
SETTINGS FOR BLUE MOUNTAIN GRA AND WHITE RIVER ACEC 



SPNM 

SPNM 




ITALIC FONT - Physical Setting 
BLOCK FONT = Social Setting 




P = PRIMITIVE 

SPNM = SEMI-PRIMITIVE NONMOTORIZED 

SPM = SEMI-PRIMITIVE MOTORIZED 

RN = ROADED NATURAL 

R = RURAL 

MU = MODERN URBAN 



Moffat County 



Rio Blanco County 






98W 


R / 

RN 

RN 

97W 


96W X^ 




MEEKER / 






S T ==:: ^ Q4.W 






3 


3 8 


9 


J *?*+¥¥ 

12 Miles 






1:300000 
















MAP 2-2 



MAP 2-22 OFF HIGHWAY VEHICLE DESIGNATION 




Closed 



^ 



Closed 8/15-11/30 



Closed 8/15-11/30, Existing Roads, Trails, Ways, 12/1-8/14 



Designated Roads, Trails, Ways 



<MMl Existing Roads, Trails, Ways 



Existing Roads, Trails, Ways 10/1-4/30 




12 



18 M0»s 



1:300000 



MAP 2-22 



MAP 2 -23 A 
RAVEN RIDGE AND COAL OIL RIM 
ROAD AND TRAIL DESIGNATION 



N 



OS 05 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 Miki 



Open Motorized 
Closed Abandoned 
Closed Permitted 




_J 



MAP 2-23B 

YANKS GULCH, UPPER GREASEWOOD, 

AND LOWER GREASEWOOD 

ROAD AND TRAIL DESIGNATION 

Open Motorized 
Closed Abandoned 
Closed Permitted 




MAP 2-23 C 

BLACKS GULCH ACEC 

ROAD AND TRAIL DESIGNATION 



Open Motorized 
Closed Abandoned 
Closed Permitted 



BLACKS GULCH 



U 



Va 



T2N 



T 1 N 



R 95 W 



R 96 W 



M 



05 0.5 1 1.5 MU«I 



MAP 2-23D 

DUCK CREEK, RYAN GULCH, AND DUDLEY BLUFFS 

ACEC 
ROAD AND TRAIL DESIGNATION 

Open Motorized 

Closed Abandoned 

Closed Permitted 




MAP 2-23E 
COAL DRAW AND SOUTH CATHEDRAL 
BLUFFS ACEC ROAD AND TRAIL DESIGNATION 



Open Motorized 
Closed Abandoned 




S. CATHEDRAL BLUFF 



R 101 W 



R 100 W 




N 



MAP 2-23F 

DEER GULCH ACEC 

ROAD AND TRAIL DESIGNATION 



DEER GULCH 



Open Motorized 
Closed Abandoned 



T3 s 



T4 S 




R 95 W 



R 94 W 



N 



MAP 2-24 
INDIAN VALLEY/DEEP CHANNEL 
ROAD AND TRAIL DESIGNATION 



Open Motorized 
Closed Abandoned 
Closed Permitted 



T 3 N 




N 



R 96 W 



05 0.5 1 MUti 



MAP 2-25 
CANYON PINTADO 
ROAD AND TRAIL DESIGNATION 



Open Motorized 
Closed Abandoned 
Closed Permitted 




N 



5 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 Mitts 



MAP 2-26 MAJOR UTILITY CORRIDORS 




~1 



Utility Corridor 




1:500000 



IB Mta 



MAP 2-: 



MAP 2-27 AREAS NEEDING 
ENHANCED ACCESS 




! T5N 



T4NJ 



"tMNQSAUR 



T2NI 



M04\( /ii::;!:i03W 



T3S 



T4S 



T5S 



i! ..'■'Xi -■ 

•J „ •;-.£ 



& 



102W 1/ 101W 




# 



id 




Moffat Couity 



;BlO;;iranco 



^uaty 



■j^QflW 99w 



98W 



97W 



96W 



&i>.«fc£, 



Rio llanco Goarit} 




•j VN ">" .' 



Public Access 

Administrative Access 

Public and Administrative Access 




12 



16 Mhi 



1:500000 



MAP 2-27 



MAP 2-28 POTENTIAL PRESCRIBED 
NATURAL FIRE (PNF) AREAS 




Prescribed Natural Fire Areas 




12 



IB Mils* 



1:500000 



MAP 2-2* 



^ b 



*Mt0* MM 




Debris milkvetch 
(Astragalus detritalis) 



wk 






-ii\ 






V 



v y 



if 



i\\ 



i? it 



'£>A 



Wild buck-wheat 
(Eriogonum ephedroides) 



Bureau of Land Management Sensitive Plants 



APPENDIXES 



Appendix A 



APPENDIX A 



SURFACE STIPULATIONS APPLICABLE TO ALL 
SURFACE DISTURBING ACTIVITIES 



INTRODUCTION 

This appendix lists the surface 
stipulations and affected acreage 
referred to throughout the RMP. 
Where applicable, these stipulations 
would be applied to all surface 
disturbing activities associated with 
land use authorizations, permits, and 
leases issued on BLM administered 
lands . Private landowner concerns 
and objectives will be considered 
before enforcing a stipulation on 
split estate lands. 

The stipulations identified in this 
Appendix were developed in the White 
River Resource Area Umbrella Oil and 
Gas Environmental Assessment and this 
RMP- The stipulations were 
standardized to conform with the 
Colorado Oil and Gas Leasing and 
Development Environmental Impact 
Statement (BLM 1991) . 

EXCEPTIONS, MODIFICATIONS, 
AND WAIVERS 

Surface stipulations can be excepted, 
modified, or waived by the Area 
Manager if conditions warrant and the 
decision is documented through an 
environmental analysis. An exception 
would suspend the stipulation on a 
one time basis. Modifications would 
temporarily or permanently change the 
language or provision of a 
stipulation. Waivers are utilized to 
permanently remove the stipulation 
due to changed circumstances. 

DESCRIPTIONS OF SURFACE 
STIPULATIONS 

Surface stipulations consist of NO 
SURFACE OCCUPANCY, TIMING 
LIMITATIONS, AND CONTROLLED SURFACE 
USE. A no surface occupancy 
stipulation is intended to close an 
area to surface disturbance and to 
the placement of facilities. Timing 
limitation stipulations limit the 



types of activities that can occur 
during specific months of the year. 
Controlled surface use stipulations 
require that special development 
plans are submitted and approved 
before authorization is granted. 

LEASE NOTICES 

A lease notice provides information 
about a resource that is present that 
may limit activity or cause special 
operational planning to occur. Lease 
notices alert prospective lessees 
about possible limitations or 
restrictions that are applicable 
under existing laws, lease terms, 
regulations, or operational orders. 

APPLICATION OF SURFACE 
STIPULATIONS AND NOTICES 

A stipulation code has been assigned 
to each surface stipulation and lease 
notice listed in this Appendix. 
Legal descriptions have been 
developed for each stipulation code. 
For activities other than oil and gas 
leasing, applicable stipulations will 
be attached to use authorizations at 
the Resource Area as conditions of 
approval. The stipulation codes and 
legal descriptions will be placed in 
a computer data base in the Colorado 
State Office (CSO) . CSO personnel 
will utilize the data base to attach 
applicable stipulations or notices to 
new oil and gas lease parcels that 
will be sold at auction. 

The following tables provide a 
definition of the stipulations and 
the acreage affected. They also 
identify the conditions under which 
exceptions, modifications, or waivers 
would apply. Table B-l describes the 
No Surface Occupancy stipulations. 
Table B-2 lists the timing 
limitations, and Table B-3 identifies 
the requirements of the Controlled 
Surface Use Stipulations. 



A-l 



Stipulations 



Table A-l No Surface Occupancy Stipulations 



scip 

Code 



NSO-01 



Protected 
Resource 



Landslide Areas 



Acres 
Affected 



35, 710 



stipulation Description 



Landslide Areas. Identified soils are considered 
unstable and subject to slumping and mass movement. 
Surface occupancy will not be allowed in such areas 
delineated from USDA SCS Order III Soil Surveys. 

EXCEPTION: The Area Manager may authorize surface 
occupancy if an environmental analysis finds the 
nature of the proposed action could be conditioned so 
as not to impair the stability of the landslide areas. 
An exception may also be granted if a more detailed 
soil survey, i.e., Order I, conducted by a qualified 
soil scientist, finds the soil properties associated 
with the proposed action are not susceptible to 
slumping and mass movement. 

MODIFICATION: Site specific modifications may be 
granted by the Area Manager pending determination that 
a portion of the soil units meet the following 
conditions: 

1. Inclusions within the soil unit where slopes are 
less than 35 percent. 

2. A more detailed survey identifies and delineates 
wet areas and sloping rock formations, and the 
proposed action is designed to avoid those areas. 

3. The proposed action utilizes land treatments and 
soil stabilization practices that will demonstrate a 
high probability of reducing soil loss and preventing 
degradation of water quality. 

4. The proposed action would not cause slumping or 
mass movement as demonstrated through engineering and 
design criteria. 

WAIVER: None 



A-2 



Appendix A 
(Table A-1 Continued) 



NSO-02 



Raptor Nests - 
Listed and 
Candidate T/E 
Species, BLM 
Sensitive 
Species 



10, 350 



Special Status Raptors. This area encompasses the 
nests of special status raptors, including listed, 
proposed, or candidate species for listing under the 
Endangered Species Act and BLM sensitive species. 
Surface occupancy is not allowed within 1/4 mile of 
the identified nests. 

EXCEPTION: An exception may be granted by the Area 
Manager, if authorization is obtained from the USFWS 
(through applicable provisions of the Endangered 
Species Act, Eagle Protection Act, or Migratory Bird 
Treaty Act) , to interrupt active nesting attempts 
and/or cause short or long term adverse modification 
of suitable nest site characteristics. An exception 
may also be granted by the Area Manager if it is 
determined that the nature or conduct of the proposed 
or conditioned activity would not impair the function 
or utility of the nest site for current or subsequent 
nest activities or occupancy. 

MODIFICATION: Site specific modifications to the NSO 
area may be granted by the Area Manager pending 
determination that a portion of the NSO area is not 
essential to nest site functions or utility; or that 
the nature or conduct of the activity, as proposed ^ or 
conditioned, would not impair the function or utility 
of the nest site for current or subsequent nest 
activities or occupancy. The stipulation may also be 
modified if the proponent, BLM, and where necessary, 
other affected interests, negotiate compensation that 
satisfactorily offsets anticipated impacts to raptor 
breeding activities and/or habitats. Modifications 
could also occur if sufficient information is provided 
that supports the contention that the action would not 
contribute to the suppression of breeding population 
densities or the population's production or 
recruitment regime from a Geographic Reference Area 
perspective. If a species status is downgraded, or 
delisted, the NSO buffer area may be modified to an 
appropriate level . 

WAIVER: A waiver may be granted if the species becomes 
extinct or if site conditions change such that there 
is no reasonable likelihood of occupation for a 
subsequent minimum period of 10 years. 



A- 3 



Stipulations 
(Table A-1 Continued) 



NSO-03 Raptor Nests - 
Other than 
special status 
raptors . 



20, 900 



Other Raptors. This area encompasses raptor nests of 
other than special status raptor species. Surface 
Occupancy is not allowed within 1/8 mile of identified 
nests . 

EXCEPTION: An exception may be granted by the Area 
Manager if authorization is obtained from the USFWS 
(through applicable provisions of the Endangered 
Species Act, Eagle Protection Act, or Migratory Bird 
Treaty Act) , to interrupt active nesting attempts 
and/or cause short or long term adverse modification 
of suitable nest site characteristics. The Area 
Manager may also grant an exception if an 
environmental analysis finds that the nature or 
conduct of the action, as proposed or conditioned, 
would not impair the function or utility of the nest 
site for current or subsequent nest activities or 
occupancy. 

MODIFICATION: Site specific modifications to the NSO 
area may be granted by the Area Manager pending 
determination that a portion of the NSO area is not 
essential to nest site functions or utility; or that 
the nature or conduct of the activity, as proposed or 
conditioned, would not impair the function or utility 
of the nest site for current or subsequent nest 
activities or occupancy. The stipulation may also be 
modified if the proponent, BLM, and where necessary, 
other affected interests, negotiate compensation that 
satisfactorily offsets anticipated impacts to 
candidate raptor breeding activities and/or habitats. 
Modifications could also occur if sufficient 
information is provided that supports the contention 
that the action would not contribute to the 
suppression of breeding population densities or the 
population's production or recruitment regime from a 
Geographic Reference Area perspective. 

WAIVER: A waiver may be granted by the Area Manager if 
documentation shows the nest site has been abandoned 
for a minimum of 3 years; or that the site conditions, 
including surrounding nest habitat, have changed such 
that there is no reasonable likelihood of site 
occupation for a subsequent minimum period of 10 
years . 



A-4 



Appendix A 

(Table A-1 Continued) 



NSO-04 



Sage grouse leks 



5,490 



Sage Grouse Leks. This area encompasses sage grouse 
leks. Surface Occupancy is not allowed within 1/4 
mile of identified lek sites. 

EXCEPTION: An exception may be granted by the Area 
Manager if an environmental analysis determines that 
the action, as proposed or conditioned, would not 
impair the function or utility of the site for current 
or subsequent reproductive display, including daytime 
loafing/staging activities. 

MODIFICATION: The NSO area may be modified in extent, 
or substituted with a timing limitation, by the Area 
Manager if an environmental analysis finds that a 
portion of the NSO area is nonessential to site 
utility or function, or that the proposed action could 
be conditioned so as not to impair the function or 
utility of the site for current or subsequent 
reproductive display, including daytime 
loafing/staging activities. The stipulation may also 
be modified if the proponent, BLM, CDOW, and where 
necessary, other affected interests, negotiate 
compensation that satisfactorily offsets anticipated 
impacts to sage grouse breeding activities and/or 
habitats . 

WAIVER: This stipulation may be waived if, in 
cooperation with the Colorado Division of Wildlife, it 
is determined that the site has been permanently 
abandoned or unoccupied for a minimum of 5 years,- site 
conditions have changed such that there is no 
reasonable likelihood of site occupation for a 
subsequent minimum period of 10 years. 



NSO-05 



Bald eagle 
roost /concentrat 
ion area 



830 



Bald Eagle Roosts. This area encompasses bald eagle 
nocturnal roosts and/or concentration areas. Surface 
occupation is not allowed within 1/4 mile of 
designated features. 

EXCEPTION: An exception may be granted by the Area 
Manager if authorization is obtained from the USFWS 
(through applicable provisions of the Endangered 
Species Act, Eagle Protection Act, or Migratory Bird 
Treaty Act) , to interrupt roosting activities and/or 
cause short or long term adverse modification of 
suitable roost site characteristics. The Area Manager 
may also grant an exception if an environmental 
analysis indicates that the nature or conduct of the 
action, as proposed or conditioned, would not impair 
the function or utility of the site for current or 
subsequent roosting activities or occupancy. 

MODIFICATIONS: The NSO may be modified by the Area 
Manager if an environmental analysis indicates that a 
portion of the area is nonessential to roost site 
function or utility; or that the proposed action could 
be conditioned to not impair the function or utility 
of the site for current or subsequent roosting 
activities or occupancy. The stipulation may also be 
modified commensurate with changes in species status. 

WAIVER: The stipulation may be waived if the species 
becomes extinct or if the site has failed to support 
roosting activities over a minimum three year period. 
A waiver may also apply if the area has changed such 
that there is no reasonable likelihood of site 
occupation for a subsequent minimum period of 10 
years . 



A-5 



Stipulations 

(Table A-1 Continued) 



NSO-06 



NSO-7 



NSO-8 



ACECs 

-Dudley Bluffs 
(1, 630 acres) 
-Yanks 
Gulch/Upper 
Greasewood 
Creek (2,680 
acres ) 
-Lower 
Greasewood 
Creek (210 
acres) 
Raven Ridge 
(2,090 acres) - 
South Cathedral 
Bluffs (320 
acres ) 
-Deer Gulch 
(1810 acres) 

-Ryan Gulch 
(1,440 acres) 
-South Cathedral 
Bluffs Addition 
(1,010 acres) 
-Raven Ridge 
Addition (2,890 
acres) 

-Blacks Gulch 
(800 acres) 
-Coal Draw 
(1,840 acres) 
-Moosehead 
(10,220 acres) 
-Duck Creek 
(3430 Acres) 



30,370 
acres 



Duck Creek 
wickiup site 



Known and 
Potential 
Habitat for 
Listed and 
Candidate T/E 
Plant Species 



46, 840 



ACECs. These 

invertebrate 

possess plant species 

candidates for listing, 

Colorado plant species 

vegetation associations 



ACECs contain vertebrate and/or 
fossils of high scientific value or 
that are listed as T/E, 
BLM sensitive, State of 
of concern, or remnant 
Surface occupancy or 
disturbance will not be allowed within the boundaries 
of the ACEC. 



EXCEPTION: The Area Manager may grant an exception to 
this stipulation if, after an on the ground plant 
inventory is conducted, an environmental analysis 
indicates that the nature or conduct of the action as 
proposed or conditioned, would not directly ' or 
indirectly affect the identified important values of 
the ACEC. 

MODIFICATION: None. 

WAIVER: NONE. 



DUCK CREEK WICKIUP SITE. This site is listed on the 
National Register of Historic Places. Surface 
occupancy is not allowed within this site. 

EXCEPTION: None. 

MODIFICATION: None. 

WAIVER: none. 



Known and Potential Habitat of Listed and Candidate 
T/E Plant Species. This area contains T/E plants 
candidate T/E plants, or potential habitat for these 
plants. No surface occupancy will be allowed on 
mapped populations of these plants. 

EXCEPTION: The Area Manager may grant an exception if 
an inventory and subsequent environmental analysis 
indicates that the nature or conduct of the action as 
proposed or conditioned, would not directly ' or 
indirectly affect plant populations. 

MODIFICATION: None. 

WAIVER : NONE . 



A- 6 



Appendix A 

(Table A-1 Continued) 



NSO-9 


BLM Sensitive 
Plants and 
Remnant 
Vegetation 
Associations 
(RVA) 


4, 520 


SENSITIVE PLANTS AND REMNANT VEGETATION ASSOCIATIONS. 
This area contains BLM sensitive plants and remnant 
vegetation associations. Surface occupation will not 
be allowed within known populations of these plants. 

EXCEPTION: The Area Manager may grant an exception if 
an inventory and subsequent environmental analysis 
indicates that the nature or conduct of the action, as 
proposed or conditioned, would not directly or 
indirectly affect plant populations. An exception may 
also be applied if the NSO would hinder or preclude 
the exercise of valid existing rights. Under that 
circumstance, protection of the plants would be 
afforded through Conditions of Approval, that would 
require reclamation of disturbed areas to include 
utilizing native seed mixes in RVAs , and reproducing 
sensitive species via transplant or some other means 
in areas containing sensitive species. 

MODIFICATION: None. 

EXCEPTION: None. 


NSO-10 


Oak Ridge State 
Wildlife Area 


9,300 


OAK RIDGE STATE WILDLIFE AREA. This area involves 
federal lands within the perimeter of the Oak Ridge 
state Wildlife Area. Surface occupancy is not allowed 
within the designated area. 

EXCEPTION: The Area Manager may grant an exception, in 
consultation with the Colorado Division of Wildlife, 
if an environmental analysis finds that the proposed 
action could be conditioned to be compatible with the 
wildlife values and public uses associated with the 
area. 

MODIFICATION: None. 

WAIVER: None. 



A- 7 



Stipulations 



Stip 
Code 



CSU-1 



CSU-2 



Table A-2 Controlled Surface Use Stipulations 



Protected 
Resource 



fragile soils 
on slopes > 
3 5% and Saline 
soils derived 
from Mancos 
Shale 



Affected 
acreage 



536,260 



ACECs 



-White River 
Riparian (950 
acres) 

-Coal Oil Rim 
(3,210 acres) , 

-Oil Spring 
Mountain 
(18,260 acres) 

-East Douglas 
Creek (61,395 
acres) 



83,815 
acres 



Stipulation Description 



Fragile Soils on Slopes Greater Than 35 Percent and 
Saline Soils. Surface disturbing activities will be 
allowed in these areas only after an engineered 
construction/reclamation plan is submitted by the 
operator and approved by the Area Manager. The 
following items must be addressed in the plan: 1) How 
soil productivity will be restored; 2) How surface 
runoff will be treated to avoid accelerated erosion 
such as riling, gullying, piping, and mass wasting; 

EXCEPTION: An exception may be granted by the Area 
Manager if an environmental analysis of the proposed 
action identifies that the scale of the operation 
would not result in any long term decrease in site 
productivity or increased erosion. An exception may 
also be granted by the Area Manager if a more detailed 
soil survey determines that soil properties associated 
with the disturbance do not meet fragile soil 
criteria. 

MODIFICATION: None 

WAIVER: None 



ACECs. These ACECs are known to contain, or have 
potential to contain, T/E plants or plants that are 
candidates for listing as T/E, State of Colorado plant 
species of concern, BLM sensitive plants, remnant 
vegetation associations, and/or unique plant 
communities. A plant inventory will be conducted 
prior to approving any surface disturbing activities 
within the ACEC boundaries. Surface disturbance will 
not be allowed within mapped locations of these 
plants. The presence of the above listed plants would 
require relocating surface disturbance or facilities 
more than 200 meters. The timing required for 
conducting the plant inventories may require deferring 
activities longer than 60 days. 

EXCEPTION: This stipulation may be excepted by the 
Area Manager if an environmental analysis of the 
proposed action indicates that the plants of concern 
would not be affected. 

MODIFICATION: None. 

WAIVER: None. 



A- 8 



Appendix A 
(Table A-2 Continued) 



CSU-3 



Ferret 

Re introduction 

Area 



53,830 



Black-Footed Ferret Reintroduction Area. This is a 
controlled surface use area for promoting the 
reestablishment and development of a self-sustaining 
black- footed ferret population. Prior to authorizing 
activities in this area, the Area Manager will confer 
or consult with the USFWS as required by Section 7 of 
the Endangered Species Act. Depending on the scope of 
the proposed action, a plan of development may be 
required that demonstrates how the proposed activities 
would be conducted or conditioned to: 1) avoid the 
direct or indirect loss of black- footed ferrets; or 2) 
avoid affecting the capability of the site to achieve 
reestablishment objectives. The Area Manager may 
impose land use measures and limitations derived from 
a site specific ferret reintroduction and management 
plan. The measures and limitations would be designed 
to avoid, or reduce to acceptable levels, the short 
and long term adverse affects on ferret survival, 
behavior, reproductive activities, and/or the area's 
capacity to sustain ferret population objectives. 
Examples of measures and limitations include: 1) 
relocation of surface activities more than 200 meters; 
2) deferring activities longer than 60 days; 3) 
limiting access to designated roads and trails; 4) 
modifications to project design to discourage raptor 
perching and prohibit the disruption of certain or all 
prairie dog burrow systems; 5) limit surface 
disturbance to certain seasons and times of day; 6) 
require participation in ferret surveys and/or efforts 
to offset loses of, or expand suitable prairie dog 
habitats to compensate for unavoidable habitat loss or 
adverse habitat modification. 

EXCEPTION: The Area Manager may authorize surface 
disturbance or use within these areas if an 
environmental analysis, and associated biological 
assessment, finds that the activity as proposed of 
conditioned, would not adversely influence ferret 
recovery, or conflict with the ferret reintroduction 
and management plan. 

MODIFICATION: The Area Manager may modify the terms of 
the CSU if the proposed action is shown to be 
compatible with ferret recovery goals and/ or the 
ferret reintroduction and management plan. 

WAIVER: The Area Manager may grant a waiver if 
extirpation of wild, free roaming ferret populations 
culminates in the discontinuance of the species 
recovery program, or local reintroduction efforts are 
otherwise abandoned . 



A- 9 



Stipulations 
(Table A-2 Continued) 



CSU-4 



Aspen, 

Serviceberry, 

and 

Chokecherry 

Communities 



61, 540 



CSU-5 



Bald Eagle 
Nest, Roost, 
and Perch 
Habitat 



6,720 



Blue Mountain Deciduous Browse/Aspen Communities. This 
is a controlled surface use area in order to maintain 
the distribution, condition, and functional capacity 
of deciduous browse and aspen communities integral to 
high priority big game and blue grouse habitats. 
Prior to authorizing activities in this area, the 
proponent/applicant would be required to submit a plan 
of development that would demonstrate that: 1) 
involvement of aspen, serviceberry, and chokecherry 
associations have been avoided to the extent possible; 
2) special reclamation measures or design features 
would promote accelerated recovery or establishment of 
desirable plant community components; 3) the potential 
or capacity of the area to support viable, self 
sustaining aspen, serviceberry, and chokecherry 
communities has not been diminished; 4) involvement of 
community derived values are mitigated through project 
life commensurate with projected impacts. Surface 
disturbance or occupation within aspen, serviceberry 
, and chokecherry communities may be prohibited. 

EXCEPTION: The Area Manager may authorize actions 
within this area, without a plan of development, if an 
environmental analysis indicates that the proposed 
action would not involve or adversely affect the 
desirable attributes of the deciduous browse/aspen 
communities, or their wildlife related functions. 
Surface disturbance and occupation may also be 
authorized if established impacts to community derived 
habitat values would be compensated or offset to the 
satisfaction of the Area Manager. 

MODIFICATION: Integral with exception and stipulation. 
WAIVER: None 



Bald Eagle Nest, Roost, and Perch Substrate. This is 
a controlled surface use area for maintaining the long 
term suitability, utility and development 
opportunities for specialized habitat features 
involving nest, roost, and perch substrate on federal 
lands. Prior to authorizing surface disturbance 
within this area, and pending conferral or 
consultation with the USFWS as required by the 
Endangered Species Act, the Area Manager may require 
the proponent/applicant to submit a plan of 
development that would demonstrate that: 1) 
involvement of cottonwood stands or cottonwood 
regeneration areas have been avoided to the extent 
practicable; 2) special reclamation measures or design 
features are incorporated that would accelerate 
recovery and/or reestablishment of affected cottonwood 
communities; 3) the pre -development potential of 
affected floodplains to develop or support riverine 
cottonwood communities has not been diminished; and 4) 
the current /future utility of such cottonwood 
substrate for bald eagle use would not be impaired. 

EXCEPTION: The Area Manager may grant an exception to 
this stipulation if an environmental analysis 
indicates that the proposed or conditioned activities 
would not affect the long term suitability or utility 
of habitat features or diminish opportunities for 
natural floodplain functions. Surface disturbance and 
occupation may also be authorized in the event that 
established impacts to habitat values would be 
compensated or offset to the satisfaction of the BLM 
in consultation with USFWS and CDOW. 

MODIFICATION: Integral with exception and stipulation. 
WAIVER: None 



A-10 



Appendix A 
(Table A-2 Continued) 



CSU-6 



Colorado River 
Cutthroat 
Trout Habitat 



67, 830 



Colorado River Cutthroat Trout Habitat. This is a 
controlled surface use area for protecting "flgtxc 
habitats occupied by populations of Colorado River 
cutthroat trout. Prior to authorizing surface 
disturbance of occupied stream reache s ° r "ithin 
watersheds contributing to occupied habitats, the Area 
Manager may require the proponent/applicant to submit 
a plan of development that would demonstrate that the 
proposed action would not: 1) increase stream 
gradient- 2) result in a net increase in sediment 
contribution; 3) decrease stream channel sinuosity; 4) 
increase the channel width to depth ratio; 5) increase 
water temperature; 6) decrease vegetation derived 
stream shading; and 7) degrade existing wa "^ditv 
parameters, including specific conductance turbidity 
organic/inorganic contaminant levels, and dissolved 
oxygen in .occupied reaches or contributing P««mial 
or^intermittent tributaries. If ^-PProval* are panted 
and development results in these standards > *•«£ 
exceeded, additional measures would be required to 
correct the deficiencies. The proponent ™£ ^ 
required to monitor stream/ channel responses 
throughout the life of the project. 

EXCEPTION: The Area Manager may authorize surface 
disturbance in these areas if an environmental 
analysis indicates that the project would have no 
adverse influence on identified stream 
characteristics . 




lort term deviations will 
affected channel 



have no 
reaches 



Area Manage 

analysis, that 

adverse consequences 

beyond the construction phase of the project. 

WAIVER: in the event the population »«tU._of_Colorado 
River cutthroat trout warrants c 
stipulation may be replaced by 
criteria. 



this 
stringent 



A-ll 



Stipulations 
(Table A-2 Continued) 



CSU-7 Canyon Pintado 
National 
Historic 
District 



16,040 



CSU-8 



Coal Mine 



8,146 



Canyon Pintado National Historic District. This is a 
controlled surface use area for the protection of 
cultural resources. The Area Manager may approve 
actions within this area if an environmental analysis 
and inventory indicates that the proposed action is 
compatible with the intent of the Historic District, 
and can comply with Historic District cultural 
resource protection requirements. All proposed 
actions will be reviewed for conflicts with known 
archaeological or historical resources. In areas of 
conflicts, a pedestrian inventory of the proposed 
project area will be completed by a qualified 
archaeologist using standards specified by the BLM. 
The Area Manager may require that a qualified 
archaeologist be present to monitor operations during 
surface disturbing activities. If archaeological 
resources are located during the inventory, the 
proposed action will be relocated to avoid and protect 
the cultural values. Proposed actions that produce 
vibrations will be located a distance far enough away 
from rock art or structural features to allow full 
attenuation of the vibration before it gets to the 
resource of concern. All inventories are required to 
be submitted to the BLM in report form and are subject 
to review by the Colorado State Historic Preservation 
Office and the Advisory Council on Historic 
Preservation prior to approval of the proposed action. 
Surface Occupation may not be allowed to occur in 
order to protect cultural resources. 

EXCEPTION: None 

MODIFICATION: None 

WAIVER: None 



Permitted Coal Mine. This area is included in the 
approved permit area for the Deserado Coal Mine. The 
oil and gas lessee must reach agreement with the 
federal coal lessee on the placement of wells or 
surface facilities within the coal mine permit area. 
Surface occupation may not be allowed within the mine 
permit area. 

EXCEPTION: The Area Manager may grant an exception to 
this stipulation if the coal lessee and the oil and 
gas lessee have reached an agreement as to the 
location of well(s) and surface facilities. 

MODIFICATION: NONE 

WAIVER: The Area Manager may waive this stipulation if 
the coal mining operation is abandoned. 



A-12 



Appendix A 



Table A- 3 Timing Limitation Stipulations 



Stip 
Code 



Protected 
Resource 



Affected 
Acreage 



Stipulation Description 



TL-01 



Raptor Nesting 
Sites (Listed 
and Candidate 
T/E and BLM 
Sensitive 
species except 
Bald Eagle and 
Ferruginous 
Hawks) 



1, 510 



Listed, Proposed, or Candidate T/E and BLM Sensitive 
Raptors Other Than Bald Eagles and Ferruginous Hawks. 
This area encompasses the nests of threatened, 
endangered, or candidate raptors. Nc development 
activities are allowed within 1/2 mile of identified 
nest sites from February 1 through August 15, or until 
fledgling and dispersal of young. (Development 
activities allowed from August 16 through January 31). 

EXCEPTION: An exception may be granted to these dates 
by the Area Manager, if authorization is obtained from 
the USFWS (through applicable provisions of the 
Endangered Species Act, Eagle Protection Act, or 
Migratory Bird Treaty Act) to harass, harm, wound, or 
kill in the context of active nesting attempts. An 
exception can also be granted if an environmental 
analysis of the proposed action indicates that nature 
or conduct of the activity could be conditioned so as 
not to impair the utility of nest for current or 
subsequent nesting activity or occupancy. The Area 
Manager may also grant an exception if the nest is 
unattended or remains unoccupied by May 15 of the 
project year. 

MODIFICATION: The Area Manager may modify the size of 
the stipulation area if an environmental analysis 
indicates that a portion of the area is nonessential 
to nest utility or function, or that the proposed 
action could be conditioned so as not to impair the 
utility of the nest site for current or subsequent 
nest activities or occupation. The stipulation may 
also be modified if the proponent, BLM, and where 
necessary, other affected interests, negotiate 
compensation that satisfactorily offsets anticipated 
impacts to raptor breeding activities and/or habitats. 
Modifications could also occur if sufficient 
information is provided that supports the contention 
that the action would not contribute to the 
suppression of breeding population densities or the 
population's production or recruitment regime from a 
Geographic Reference Area perspective. If a species 
status is downgraded, or if a species is delisted, the 
size of the TL area may be reduced. 

WAIVER: A waiver may be granted if the species becomes 
extinct or there is no reasonable likelihood of site 
occupation over a minimum 10 year period. 



A-13 



TL-02 



Bald Eagle Nests 



250 



Stipulations 

(Table A-3 Continued) 



Bald Eagle Nests. This area encompasses bald eagle 
nests. No development is allowed within 1/2 mile of 
identified nests from December 15 through July 15, or 
until fledgling and dispersal of young. (Development 
activities allowed from July 16 through December 14). 

EXCEPTION: An exception may be granted to these dates 
by the Area Manager, if authorization is obtained from 
the USFWS (through applicable provisions of the 
Endangered Species Act, Eagle Protection Act, or 
Migratory Bird Treaty Act) to harass, harm, wound, or 
kill in the context of active nesting attempts. An 
exception can also be granted if an environmental 
analysis of the proposed action indicates that nature 
or conduct of the activity could be conditioned so as 
not to impair the utility of nest for current or 
subsequent nesting activity or occupancy. The Area 
Manager may also grant an exception if the nest is 
unattended or remains unoccupied by May 15 of the 
project year. 

MODIFICATION: The Area Manager may modify the size of 
the stipulation area if an environmental analysis 
indicates that a portion of the area is nonessential 
to nest utility or function, or that the proposed 
action could be conditioned so as not to impair the 
utility of the nest site for current or subsequent 
nest activities or occupation. If the species status 
is downgraded, or if the species is delisted, the size 
of the TL area may be reduced. 

WAIVER: A waiver may be granted if the nest has 

remained unoccupied for a minimum of three years or 

conditions have changed such that there is no 

reasonable likelihood of site occupation over a 
minimum 10 year period. 



A-14 



Appendix A 
(Table A-3 Continued) 



TL-03 



Ferruginous 
Hawks 



73, 880 



Ferruginous Hawks. This area encompasses the nests of 
ferruginous hawks which are candidates for listing 
under the Endangered Species Act. No development is 
allowed within one (1) mile of identified nests from 
February 1 through August 15, or until fledgling and 
'Development activities allowed 



dispersal of young. ,- ,. 

from August 16 through January 31) . 

EXCEPTION: An exception may be granted to these dates 
by the Area Manager, if authorization is obtained from 
the USFWS (through applicable provisions of the 
Endangered Species Act, Eagle Protection Act, or 
Migratory Bird Treaty Act) to harass, harm, wound, or 
kill in the context of active nesting attempts. An 
exception can also be granted if an environmental 
analysis of the proposed action indicates that nature 
or conduct of the activity could be conditioned so as 
not to impair the utility of nest for current or 
subsequent nesting activity or occupancy. The Area 
Manager may also grant an exception if the nest is 
unattended or remains unoccupied by May 15 of the 
project year. 

MODIFICATION: The Area Manager may modify the size of 
the stipulation area if an environmental analysis 
indicates that a portion of the area is nonessential 
to nest utility or function, or that the proposed 
action could be conditioned so as not to impair the 
utility of the nest site for current or subsequent 
nest activities or occupation. The stipulation may 
also be modified if the proponent, BLM, and where 
necessary, other affected interests, negotiate 
compensation that satisfactorily offsets anticipated 
impacts to raptor breeding activities and/or habitats. 
Modifications could also occur if sufficient 
information is provided that supports the contention 
that the action would not contribute to the 
suppression of breeding population densities or the 
population's production or recruitment regime from a 
Geographic Reference Area perspective. If the species 
status is downgraded, or if the species is delisted, 
the size of the TL area may be reduced. 

WAIVER: A waiver may be granted if the nest has 
remained unoccupied for a minimum of three years or 
conditions have changed such that there is no 
reasonable likelihood of site occupation over a 
minimum 10 year period. 



A-15 



Stipulations 

(Table A-3 Continued) 



TL-04 Raptor Nests 

(other than T/E 
and candidate 
T/E species) 



72, 680 



Other Raptors. This area encompasses the nests of 
raptors that are other than threatened, endangered, or 
candidate species. No development activities are 
allowed within 1/4 mile of identified nests from 
February 1 through August 15, or until fledgling and 
dispersal of young. (Development allowed from August 
16 through January 31) 

EXCEPTION: An exception may be granted to these dates 
by the Area Manager, if authorization is obtained from 
the USFV.'S (through applicable provisions of the 
Endangered Species Act, Eagle Protection Act, or 
Migratory Bird Treaty Act) to harass, harm, wound, or 
kill in the context of active nesting attempts. An 
exception can also be granted if an environmental 
analysis of the proposed action indicates that nature 
or conduct of the activity could be conditioned so as 
not to impair the utility of nest for current or 
subsequent nesting activity or occupancy. The Area 
Manager may also grant an exception if the nest is 
unattended or remains unoccupied by May 15 of the 
project year. 

MODIFICATION: The Area Manager may modify the size of 
the stipulation area if an environmental analysis 
indicates that a portion of the area is nonessential 
to nest utility or function, or that the proposed 
action could be conditioned so as not to impair the 
utility of the nest site for current or subsequent 
nest activities or occupation. The stipulation may 
also be modified if the proponent, BLM, and where 
necessary, other affected interests, negotiate 
compensation that satisfactorily offsets anticipated 
impacts to raptor breeding activities and/or habitats. 
Modifications could also occur if sufficient 
information is provided that supports the contention 
that the action would not contribute to the 
suppression of breeding population densities or the 
population's production or recruitment regime from a 
Geographic Reference Area perspective. 

WAIVER: A waiver may be granted if the nest has 
remained unoccupied for a minimum of three years or 
conditions have changed such that there is no 
reasonable likelihood of site occupation over a 
minimum 10 year period. 



A-16 



Appendix A 
(Table A-3 Continued) 



TL-OS 



Bald Eagle Roost 
or Concentration 
Areas 



4, 590 



Bald Eagle Winter Roosts and Concentration Areas. This 
area encompasses bald eagle winter roosts and 
concentration areas. No development is allowed within 
1/2 mile of identified sites from November 15 through 
April 15. (Development allowed from April 16 through 
November 14) 

EXCEPTION: An exception may be granted to these dates 
by the Area Manager, if authorization is obtained from 
the USFWS (through applicable provisions of the 
Endangered Species Act, Eagle Protection Act or 
Migratory Bird Treaty Act) to harass, harm, wound, or 
kill in the context of ongoing roosting activities 
and/or short or long term adverse modification of 
suitable roost site characteristics. An exception can 
also be granted if an environmental analysis of the 
proposed action indicates that nature or conduct of 
the activity could be conditioned so as not to impair 
the utility of the site for current or subsequent 
roosting activities or occupancy. An exception may 
also be granted if forms of compensation are 
satisfactorily negotiated (through Section 7 
Consultation) which fully offset losses associated 
with project implementation. 

MODIFICATION: The Area Manager may modify the size of 
the stipulation area or timeframes if an environmental 
analysis indicates that a portion of the area is 
nonessential to roost site function and utility, or 
that the proposed action could be conditioned so as 
not to impair the utility of the roost site for 
current or subsequent roosting activities or 
occupancy. 

WAIVER: A waiver may be granted if the species becomes 
extinct, the site has failed to support roosting 
activities over a minimum 3 year period, or if the 
site conditions have changed such that there is no 
reasonable likelihood of site occupation over a 
minimum 10 year period. 



A- 17 



Stipulations 

(Table A-3 Continued) 



TL-06 



Sage Grouse Nest 
Habitat 



152,510 



Sage Grouse Nesting Habitat. This area encompasses 
suitable sage grouse nesting habitat associated with 
individual leks . This stipulation will not take 
effect until direct and indirect impacts to suitable 
nesting cover exceeds 10 percent of the habitat 
available within 2 miles of identified leks. Further 
development, after this threshold has been exceeded, 
will not be allowed from April 15 through July 7. 
(Development can occur until 10 percent of the habitat 
associated with a lek is impacted, from then on, 
additional activity can occur from July 8 through 
April 14) 

EXCEPTION: The Area Manager may grant an exception if 
an environmental analysis and consultation with the 
CDOW indicates that the proposed action could be 
conditioned so as not to affect nest attendance, 
egg/chick survival, or nesting success. An exception 
could also be granted if the proponent, BLM, and CDOW 
negotiate compensation that would satisfactorily 
offset the anticipated losses of nesting habitat or 
nesting activities. Actions designed to enhance the 
long term utility or availability of suitable nest 
habitat may be excepted. 

MODIFICATION: The Area Manager may modify the size of 
the TL area if an environmental analysis indicates 
that the proposed action could be conditioned so as 
not to affect nest attendance, egg/chick survival, or 
nesting success. Timeframes may be modified if 
operations could be conditioned to allow a minimum of 
70 percent of nesting attempts to progress through 
hatch. 

WAIVER: This stipulation may be waived if CDOW 
determines that the described lands are incapable of 
serving the long term requirements of sage grouse 
nesting habitat and that these ranges no longer 
warrant consideration as components of sage grouse 
nesting habitat. 



A-18 



Appendix A 
(Table A-3 Continued) 



TL-07 



Elk Production 
Areas 



12, 690 



Elk Production Area. This area encompasses an elk 
production area. No development is allowed from May 
15 through June 30. (Development can occur from July 
1 through May 14) 

EXCEPTION: The Area Manager may grant an exception if 
an environmental analysis indicates that the proposed 
action can be conditioned so as not to interfere with 
habitat function or compromise animal condition within 
the project vicinity. An exception may also be 
granted if the proponent, BLM, and CDOW negotiate 
compensation that would satisfactorily offset 
anticipated impacts to elk production or habitat 
condition. An exception may also be granted for 
actions intended to enhance the long term utility or 
availability of suitable habitat. 

MODIFICATION: The Area Manager may modify the size and 
timeframes of this stipulation if CDOW monitoring 
information indicates that current animal use patterns 
are inconsistent with dates established for animal 
occupation. Modifications could be authorized if the 
proposed action could be conditioned so as not to 
interfere with critical habitat function or compromise 
animal condition. A modification may also be approved 
if the proponent, BLM, and CDOW agree to compensation 
that satisfactorily offset detrimental impacts to elk 
production or habitat condition. 

WAIVER: This stipulation may be waived if CDOW 
determines that the area is no longer utilized by elk 

tor production purposes. 



A-19 



Stipulations 
(Table A-3 Continued) 



TL-08 



Big Game Severe 
Winter Range 



512,905 
acres 



Big Game Severe Winter Range. This area encompasses 
big game severe winter range. No development activity 
is allowed from December 1 through April 30. 
(Development is allowed from May 1 through November 
30) 

EXCEPTION: The Area Manager may grant an exception if 
an environmental analysis indicates that the proposed 
action could be conditioned so as not to interfere 
with habitat function or compromise animal condition 
within the project vicinity. An exception may also be 
granted if the proponent, BLM, and CDOW negotiate 
compensation that would satisfactorily offset 
anticipated impacts to big game winter activities or 
habitat condition. Under mild winter conditions, when 
prevailing habitat or weather conditions allow early 
dispersal of animals from all or portions of a project 
area, an exception may be granted to suspend the last 
60 days of this seasonal limitation. Severity of 
winter will be determined on the basis of snow depth, 
snow crusting, daily mean temperatures, and whether 
animals were concentrated on the winter range during 
the winter months. Exceptions may also be granted for 
actions specifically intended to enhance the long term 
utility or availability of suitable habitat. 

MODIFICATION: The Area Manager may modify the size and 
timeframes of this stipulation if CDOW monitoring 
information indicates that current animal use patterns 
are inconsistent with dates established for animal 
occupation. Modifications may also be authorized if 
the proposed action could be conditioned so as not to 
interfere with habitat function or compromise animal 
condition. In addition, if the proponent, BLM, and 
CDOW agree to habitat compensation that satisfactorily 
offsets detrimental impacts to activity or habitat 
condition. 

WAIVER: This stipulation may be waived if the CDOW 
determines that all or specific portions of the area 
no longer satisfy this functional capacity. 



A-20 



Appendix A 
(Table A-3 Continued) 



TL-09 



Deer/Elk Summer 
Range 



259,363 
acres 



Deer and Elk Summer Range. This area is located within 
deer and elk summer ranges, which due to limited 
extent, are considered critical habitat within 
appropriate CDOW Game Management units. This 
stipulation will not take effect until direct and 
indirect impacts to suitable summer range habitats 
exceed 10 percent of that available within the 
individual Game Management Units, when this threshold 
has been reached, no further development activity will 
be allowed from May 15 through August 15. 
(Development is allowed until 10 percent of individual 
GMU summer habitat has been affected, then additional 
development is allowed from August 16 through May 14) 

EXCEPTION: The Area Manager may grant an exception if 
an environmental analysis indicates that the proposed 
action could be conditioned to have no additional 
influence on the utility or suitability of summer 
range habitats. An exception may also be granted if 
the proponent, BLM, and CDOW negotiate compensation 
that would satisfactorily offset anticipated impacts 
to summer range function or habitat. Exceptions may 
also be granted for actions specifically intended to 
enhance the long term utility or availability of 
suitable habitat. 

MODIFICATION: The Area Manager may modify the size and 
timeframes of this stipulation if CDOW monitoring 
information indicates that current animal use patterns 
are inconsistent with dates established for animal 
occupation. Modifications may also be authorized if 
the proposed action could be conditioned to have no 
additional influence on the utility or suitability of 
summer range habitats. 

WAIVER: This stipulation may be waived if the CDOW 
determines that all or specific portions of the area 
no longer satisfy this functional capacity or that 
these summer ranges no longer merit critical habitat 
status. Waivers will also be applied to delineated 
summer range occurring below 2,250 meters (7,350 feet) 
in elevation. 



TL-10 


Sage grouse 
crucial winter 
habitat 





Sage Grouse Winter Concentration Areas. This area 
encompasses sagebrush habitats that are occupied by 
wintering concentrations of grouse, or represent the 
only habitats that remain available for use during 
periods of heavy snowpack. No development activity 
will be allowed between December 16 and March 15. 
The Colorado Division of Wildlife (CDOW) has 
indicated that these features exist on public lands 
within the White River Resource Area but have not 
yet delineated specific areas that will be subject 
to this timing restriction. Specific Exception, 
Modification, and Waiver language will be developed 
in cooperation with the CDOW after the affected 
areas have been delineated. 


TL-11 


Pronghorn 
production areas 





Pronghorn Production Areas. This area is located 
within a pronghorn production area. No development 
activity is allowed within this area between May 1 
and June 30. The Colorado Division of Wildlife 
(CDOW) has indicated that these features exist on 
public lands within the White River Resource Area 
but have not yet delineated specific areas that will 
be subject to this timing restriction. Specific 
Exception, Modification, and Waiver language will be 
developed in cooperation with the CDOW after the 
affected areas have been delineated. 



A-21 



Stipulations 



Table a-4. Lease Notices 



Notice 
code 



LN-1 



Resource of 
Concern 



Prairie Dog 
Towns 



Applicable Area 



Mapped areas 



LN-2 



Paleonto- 

logical 

Resources 



Wasatch, Uinta, 
DeBeque, Upper 
Mesa Verde, 
Green River, 
and other 
formations 
containing 
scientifically 
significant 
fossil 
localities . 



Notice Description 



Prairie Dog Towns. Lands within this lease parcel 
involve prairie dog ecosystems that constitute 
potential habitat for wild or reintroduced 
populations of the federally endangered black- 
footed ferret. Conservation and recovery efforts 
for the black- footed ferret are authorized by the 
Endangered Species Act of 1973 (as amended) . The 
successful lessee may be required to perform 
special conservation measures prior to and during 
lease development. These measures may include one 
or more of the following: 

1. Performing site-specific habitat analysis 
and/or participating in ferret surveys. 

2. Participating in the preparation of a surface 
use plan of operations with BLM, USFWS, and CDOW 
which integrates and coordinates long term lease' 
development with measures necessary to minimize 
adverse impacts to black- footed ferrets or their 
habitat. 

3. Abiding by special daily and seasonal activity 
restrictions on construction, drilling, product 
transport, and service activities. 

4. Incorporating special modifications to facility 
siting, design, construction, and operation. 

5. Providing in-kind compensation for habitat loss 
and/or displacement (e.g, special on-site 
rehabilitation/revegetation measures or off-site 

habitat enhancement) . 



Paleontological Values. This lease encompasses a 
Class I paleontological area and has the potential 
to contain important fossils. Prior to 
authorizing surface disturbing activities, the BLM 
will make a preliminary determination as to 
whether potential exists for the presence of 
fossil material. If potential exists for the 
presence of valuable fossils, the area will be 
required to have a Class I paleontological survey 
completed. Mapped fossil sites will be protected 
by applying the appropriate mitigation to the use 
authorization. Mitigation may involve the 
relocation of disturbance in excess of 200 meters 
or excavation and recording of the fossil remains' 
Certain areas may require the presence of a 
qualified paleontologist to monitor operations 
during surface disturbing activities. BLM will 
determine the disposition of any fossils 
discovered and excavated. 



A-22 



Appendix A 

(Table A-4 Continued) 



LN-3 


Wild Horse 
Habitac 


Herd Management 
Areas 


Wild Horse Habitat. This lease parcel encompasses 
a portion of a wild horse herd management area. 
In order to protect wild horses within this area, 
intensive development activities may be delayed 
for a specified 60 day period within the spring 
foaling period between March 1 and June 15. 

The lessee may be required to perform special 
conservation measures within this area including: 
1) Habitat improvement projects in adjacent areas 
if development displaces wild horses from critical 
habitat; 2) Disturbed watering areas would be 
replaced with an equal source of water, having 
equal utility; 3) Activity/ improvements would 
provide for unrestricted movement of wild horses 
between summer and winter ranges. 



A-23 




Noxious/Problem Weeds 



Canada thistle 
(Cirsium arvense) 




<^ 



Yellow toadflax 
CLinaria vulgaris) 




Spotted knap-weed 
(Centaurea maculosa) 



Appendix B 



APPENDIX B 

CONDITIONS OF APPROVAL 



INTRODUCTION 

This Appendix lists the Conditions 
of Approval (COA) that have been 
developed over a number of years, 
usually through environmental 
documentation, that have been 
proven to mitigate impacts from 
surface disturbing activities. 
These COAs were identified as Best 
Management Practices in the Draft 
RMP. However, that terminology 
caused confusion among the various 
public land users. Many of these 
COAs^ are already included by 
applicants in their request for 
authorization approvals. This 
practice will often speed up the 
authorization review process. if 
an applicable COA, or other 
mitigation that will accomplish 
the desired goal, is not included 
in an application, BLM resource 
specialists will utilize the 
applicable conditions presented 
here to help mitigate impacts. 
These conditions will apply, where 
appropriate, to all use 
authorizations, including BLM 
initiated projects. Approved 
projects will be monitored to 
determine the effectiveness of the 
COA in accomplishing the desired 
goal. Applicants can suggest 
alternate conditions that could 
accomplish the same or better 
result. 



would be required to 
riparian/wetland habitat. 



avoid 



ALL SURFACE 
ACTIVITIES 



DISTURBING 



1. No operations using chemical 
processes or other pollutants in 
their activities will be allowed 
to occur within 200 feet of any 
water bodies. 

2. Surface disturbing activities 



3 . Locate and maintain sanitation 
facilities according to state 
regulations . 

4. When preparing the site, all 
suitable topsoil should be 
stripped from the surface of the 
location and stockpiled for 
reclamation once the location is 
abandoned. When topsoil is 
stockpiled on slopes exceeding 
five percent, construct a berm or 
trench below the stockpile. 

5. Sedimentation shall be diverted 
and/or run through catchment 
basins in order to protect surface 
waters . 

6. All sediment control structures 
or disposal pits, will be designed 
to contain a 100-year, 6-hour 
storm event. Storage volumes 
within these structures will have 
a design life of 25 years. 

7. All trees removed in the 
process of construction shall be 
purchased from the Bureau of Land 
Management. The trees shall be 
cut with a maximum stump height of 
six inches and disposed of by one 
of the following methods: 

a. Trees must be cut before 
being dozed off the area of 
disturbance. Trees shall be cut 
into four-foot lengths, down to 
four inches in diameter and placed 
along the edge of the disturbance. 

b. Purchased trees may be 
removed from federal land for 
resale or private use. Limbs may 
be scattered off the area of 
disturbance but not dozed off. 



B-l 



Conditions of Approval 



c. Chipped and scattered. 

8. All activity shall cease when 
soils or road surfaces become 
saturated to a depth of three 
inches unless otherwise approved 
by the Authorized Officer. 

9. There shall be no mud blading 
of roads. Vehicles may be towed 
through the mud provided they stay 
within the original roadway. 

10. Special design and reclamation 
measures may be required to 
protect scenic and natural 
landscape values. These design 
and measures may include 
transplanting trees and shrubs, 
mulching and fertilizing disturbed 
areas, use of low profile 
permanent facilities, and painting 
to minimize visual contrasts. 
Surface disturbing activities may 
be moved up to 2 00 meters to avoid 
sensitive areas or to reduce the 
visual affects of the proposal. 
These measures would be applied to 
the following VRM Class II and III 
areas: Canyon Pintado National 
Historic District; Highways 13, 
40, 64, and 139 corridors; 
Viewsheds in the Blue Mountain/ 
Moosehead GRA; White River 
Corridor; Douglas and Baxter Pass 
divide; Cathedral Bluffs; and VRM 
Class II areas around Meeker. 
These measures may also be applied 
to other areas on a case by case 
basis . 

11. All above ground facilities 
shall be painted to blend in with 
the surrounding environment. 

12. All disturbed areas will be 
contoured to blend with the 
natural topography. Blending is 
defined as reducing form, line, 
and color contrast associated with 
the surface disturbance. In 
visually sensitive areas and WSAs, 
all disturbed areas shall be 
contoured to match the original 



topography. Matching is defined 
as reproducing the original 
topography and eliminating form, 
line, and color caused by the 
disturbance as much as possible. 



ROAD CONSTRUCTION 
MAINTENANCE 



AND 



13. Base road design criteria and 
standards on road management 
objectives such as traffic 
requirements of the proposed 
activity and the overall 
transportation plan, economic 
analysis, safety requirements, 
resource objectives, and 
minimizing damage to the 
environment . 

14. Locate roads so as to minimize 
their influence on riparian areas 
and, when stream crossing is 
necessary, design the approach and 
crossing perpendicular to the 
channel. Locate the crossing 
where the channel is well-defined, 
unobstructed and straight. 

15. Locate roads on stable 
positions (e.g., ridges, natural 
benches, and flatter transitional 
slopes near ridges and valley 
bottoms) . Implement extra 
mitigation measures when crossing 
areas of unstable or fragile 
soils . 

16. Avoid headwalls, midslope 
locations on steep, unstable 
slopes, seeps, old landslides, 
slopes in excess of 70 percent, 
and areas where the geologic 
bedding planes or weathering 
surfaces are inclined with the 
slope. 

17. Locate roads to minimize 
heights of cutbanks . Avoid high, 
steeply sloping cutbanks in highly 
fractured bedrock. 

18. Locate roads on well-drained 
soil types. Avoid wet areas. 



B-2 



Appendix B 



19. Sloping the road base to the 
outside edge for surface drainage 
is normally recommended for local 
spurs or minor collector roads 
where low volume traffic and lower 
traffic speeds are anticipated. 
This is also recommended in 
situations where long intervals 
between maintenance will occur and 
where minimum excavation is 
wanted. Outsloping is not 
recommended on gradients greater 
than eight to 10 percent. 

20. Sloping the road base to the 
inside edge is an acceptable 
practice on roads with gradients 
more than 10 percent and where the 
underlying soil formation is very 
rocky and not subject to 
appreciable erosion or failure. 

21. Crown and ditching is 
recommended for arterial and 
collector roads where traffic 
volume, speed, intensity and user 
comfort are considerations. 
Gradients may range from two to 15 
percent as long as adequate 
drainage away from the road 
surface and ditchlines is 
maintained. 

22. Minimize excavation through 
use of balanced earthwork, 
narrowing road width, and 
endhauling where slopes are 
greater than 60 percent. 

23. Surface roads if they will be 
subject to traffic during wet 
weather. The depth and gradation 
of surfacing will be determined by 
traffic type, frequency, weight, 
maintenance objectives, and the 
stability and strength of the road 
foundation and surface materials. 



where it restricts safety or 
maintenance. 

25. When roads are located in low- 
lying areas, ensure that the road 
surface is constructed above the 
adjacent ground surface. 

26. Avoid sidecasting where it 
will adversely affect water 
quality or weaken stabilized 
slopes . 

27. Provide for erosion-resistant 
surface drainage prior to fall 
rain or snow. 

28. Improve flat gradients to a 
minimum of two percent or provide 
raised subgrade sections to avoid 
saturation of the road base. 

29. Reconstruct culvert 
catchbasins to specifications (See 
BLM Manual IX. D and F) . 
Catchbasins in solid rock need not 
be reconstructed provided water 
flow is not restricted by soil, 
rock, or other debris. 

30. Identify potential water 
problems caused by off-site 
disturbance and add necessary 
drainage facilities. 

31. Identify ditchline and outlet 
erosion caused by excessive flows 
and add necessary drainage 
facilities and armoring. 

32. Replace undersized culverts 
and repair or replace damaged 
culverts and downspouts . 

33. Add additional full-rounds, 
half-rounds, and energy 
dissipators as needed. 



24. Provide vegetative or 
artificial stabilization of cut 
and fill slopes in the design 
process. Avoid establishment of 
vegetation where it inhibits 
drainage from the road surface or 



34. Correct special drainage 
problems (e.g., high water table, 
seeps) that affect stability of 
subgrade by using perforated 
drains, geotextiles, or drainage 
bays. 



B-3 



Conditions of Approval 



35. Eliminate undesirable berms 
that retard normal surface runoff. 

36. Surface inadequately-surfaced 
roads that are to be left open to 
public traffic during wet weather. 

37. Roadside brushing should be 
done in a way that prevents 
disturbance to root systems (i.e., 
avoid using excavators for 
brushing) . 

38. Leave abandoned roads in a 
condition that provides adequate 
drainage without further 
maintenance. 

39. Close abandoned roads to 
traffic. Physically obstruct the 
road with a gate or as many 
large berms, trenches, logs, 
stumps, or rock boulders as 
necessary to accomplish 
permanent closure. 

40. When seasonal activity is 
completed and road closure is not 
necessary, the road surface should 
be crowned, outsloped, insloped, 
or water-barred. 

41. Remove berms from the outside 
edge of road where runoff is 
channeled. 

42. Maintenance should be 
performed to conserve existing 
surface material, retain the 
original crowned or outsloped 
self-draining cross section, 
prevent or remove rutting berms 

(except those designed for slope 
protection) and other 
irregularities that retard normal 
surface runoff. Avoid wasting 
loose ditch or surface material 
over the shoulder where it can 
cause stream sedimentation or 
weaken slump-prone areas . 
Avoid undercutting backslopes. 

43. Promptly remove slide material 
when it is obstructing road 



surface and ditchline drainage. 
Save all soil or material useable 
for reclamation and stockpile for 
future reclamation needs. Use 
remaining slide material for 
needed road improvement or place 
in a stable waste area. Avoid 
sidecasting of slide material 
where it can damage, overload, 
saturate embankments, or flow into 
downslope drainage courses. 
Reestablish vegetation in areas 
where more than 50 percent of 
vegetation has been destroyed due 
to sidecasting. 

44. Retain vegetation on cut 
slopes unless it poses a safety 
hazard or restricts maintenance 
activities. Cut roadside 
vegetation rather than pulling it 
out and disturbing the soil. 

45. Bridges should be designed and 
constructed according to the 
standards provided in BLM Manual 
9112. The design, review, and 
evaluation must be accomplished 
under the direct supervision of a 
registered professional engineer. 

46. If the installation of a 
bridge would result in the 
discharge of soil into water, a 
permit must be obtained from the 
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers 
according to Section 404 of the 
Clean Water Act of 1977. 

47. Culverts should be designed 
and constructed according to the 
standards provided in BLM Manual 
9112. The design, review and 
evaluation must be accomplished 
under the direct supervision of a 
registered professional engineer. 

48. Culverts should be designed 
and placed to assure the adequate 
passage of fish, provide minimum 
impact on water quality, and 
handle peak runoff and flood 
waters. 



B-4 



Appendix B 

49. Culvert placement should lay 
on solid ground to avoid road 
failures. 

50. Proper sized aggregate and rip 
rap should be used during culvert 
construction. 

51. Locate culverts or drainage 
dips in such a manner as to avoid 
discharge onto unstable terrain 
such as headwalls or slumps. 
Provide adequate spacing to avoid 
accumulation of water in ditches 
or road surfaces. 

52. Provide energy dissipators at 
culvert outlets or drainage dips. 

53. Place rip rap at culvert 
entrance to streamline water flow 
and reduce erosion. 

54 . Install cross drains according 
to the following: 



Percent Grade 


Soa 


cina in Feet. 


1-6 




300 


7-9 




200 


10-14 




150 


15-20 




90 


21-40 




50 


Over 41 




25 



55. Use drainage dips instead of 
culverts on roads that have 
gradients less than 10 percent or 
where road management objectives 
result in blocking roads. Avoid 
drainage dips on road gradients 
greater than 10 percent. 

56. Do not locate drainage dips 
where water might accumulate or 
where there is an outside berm 
that prevents drainage from the 
roadway. 

57. Locate and design drainage 
dips immediately upgrade of stream 
crossings, providing buffers and 
sediment basins, to prevent 
sediment from entering the stream. 



58. Limit activities of mechanized 
equipment within stream channels. 

59. Place permanent stream- 
crossing structures on fishery 
streams before heavy equipment 
moves beyond the crossing area. 
Where this is not feasible, 
install temporary crossings to 
minimize stream disturbance. 

60. Use 12 inches as the minimum 
recommended cover over a culvert, 
or one-half the diameter of the 
culvert, whichever is greater. 

61. Monitor culvert installations 
to ensure adequate armoring of 
inlet and outlet and no erosion of 
design. Patrol areas susceptible 
to road or watershed damage during 
periods of high runoff. 

62. Keep road inlet and outlet 
ditches, catchbasins, and culverts 
free of obstructions, particularly 
before and during spring runoff. 
Routine machine-cleaning of 
ditches should be kept to a 
minimum during wet weather. 

TANKS AND PITS 

63. All fluid storage tanks shall 
have a dike constructed around the 
tank of sufficient capacity to 
adequately contain at least 110 
percent of the storage capacity of 
the tank. Tank batteries shall 
have a dike capable of adequately 
containing 110 percent of the 
largest tank. 

64. Pits designed to contain 
fluids shall be constructed so 
that leaking or breaching problems 
are minimized and reclamation 
potential is maximized. At least 
50 percent of the pit capacity 
shall be in cut material. When 
fractured rock or porous materials 
are encountered, pits shall be 
lined with bentonite or an 
impermeable membrane to prevent 



B-5 



Conditions of Approval 



leakage. 

65. All pits constructed in high 
and medium priority riparian areas 
(see Tables 2-30 and 2-31 in the 
Draft RMP) , will be lined with an 
impermeable membrane. 

66. Reserve pits used for drilling 
will be fenced on three sides 
prior to drilling activity and 
closed off on the fourth side 
after drilling is finished. All 
fence corners will be braced with 
an H-type brace. Within the wild 
horse range, the reserve pit fence 
shall be 48 inches high. In sheep 
allotments, the fence will have 48 
inches of woven wire and cattle 
allotments will have four strands 
of barbed wire. Fences will be 
located at least four feet from 
the edge of the pit slope. 

67. Remove all oil from the 
surface of reserve pits within 24 
hours . 

68. All produced liquids shall be 
contained in a pit or tank, 
including the dehydrator 
vent/condensate line effluent. 
All production pits shall have a 
livestock-proof fence. All pits 
shall be bermed. if inverted 
culverts are used as production 
pits, the culvert top may be 
covered with an expanded metal 
cover in lieu of fencing. 

69. Pits remaining after the 
drilling period which store or are 
expected to store production 
fluids will be wired or netted to 
prevent or discourage entry by 
larger birds attracted to sources 
of water, including raptors and 
waterfowl. At a minimum, wire 
will be stretched over the entire 
length and breadth of the pit at 
intervals not exceeding three 
feet, and made permanently 
conspicuous either by choice of 
material or installation of 



flagging material evenly 
distributed across the pit at a 
minimum rate of one flag per 18 
square feet. 

70. Reserve pits will be allowed 
to dry through natural evaporation 
for one four season cycle after 
the well is drilled. If a pit has 
not dried by the end of this 
period, all remaining fluids 
and/ or mud must be removed and 
disposed of in an approved manner. 
The pit shall be recontoured 
within 15 months after the well is 
drilled. 

71. The concentration of hazardous 
substances in the reserve pit at 
the time of pit backfilling must 
not exceed the standards set forth 
in CERCLA. 

OIL AND GAS 

72. Mineral resources and fresh 
water aquifers shall be protected 
while drilling mineral exploration 
and development wells. 

73. All wells, whether exploration 
or development, drilling, 
producing, suspended, or 
abandoned, shall be identified 
following 43 CFR 3162.6. Pressure 
tests are required before drilling 
out from under all casing strings 
set and cemented in place. 
Blowout preventer controls must be 
installed prior to drilling out 
the surface shoe and prior to 
starting workover or completion 
operations. Preventers will be 
inspected and operated at least 
daily to insure good mechanical 
working order. This inspection 
will be recorded on the daily 
drilling report. Preventers will 
be pressure tested before drilling 
out from below each casing string. 
All BOP pressure tests must be 
recorded on the daily drilling 
report. 



B-6 



Appendix B 



74. If air drilling, the operator 
shall control blooie line 
discharge dust by use of water 
injection or any other acceptable 
method. The blooie line discharge 
shall be a minimum of 100 feet 
from the well head and be directed 
into the blooie pit in such a 
manner as to allow containment of 
drill bit cuttings and waste in 
blooie pit. 

75. Well Plugging Standards: 

a. Open Hole: a cement plug 

shall be placed to extend at least 

from 50 feet below the bottom 

(except as limited by total depth 

(TD) or plugged back total depth 

(PBTD) to 50 feet above the top of 

(1) any zones encountered during 

drilling that contain fluid with 

a potential to migrate; (2) lost 

circulation zones; and (3) any 

potential valuable minerals, 

including noncommercial 

hydrocarbons, coal, and oil shale. 

Extremely thick sections may be 

secured by placing 100-foot plugs 

across the top and bottom of the 

formation. Lost circulation zones 

may require alternate methods. In 

the absence of productive zones or 

minerals that otherwise required 

placement of cement plugs, long 

sections of open hole shall be 

plugged at least every 3,000 feet. 

Such plugs shall be placed across 

in-gauge sections of the hole. 

b. Cased Hole: a cement plug 
shall be placed opposite all open 
perforations and extend a minimum 
of 50 feet below (except as 
limited by TD or PBTD) to 50 feet 
above the perforated interval. In 
lieu of the cement plug, a bridge 
plug is acceptable, provided: (1) 
the plug is set as close as 
practical above the open 
perforations; (2) the perforations 
are isolated from any open hole 
below; and (3) the plug is capped- 
if cap is placed through tubing, 



a minimum of 50 feet of fill-up is 
required; if placed by bailer, a 
minimum of 35 feet of fill-up is 
needed. If production casing is 
cut and recovered, a cement plug 
shall be placed to extend at least 
5 feet above and below the stub. 
An additional cement plug shall be 
placed to extend a minimum of 50 
feet above and below the shoe of 
the surface casing (or 
intermediate string, as 
appropriate) . The exposed hole 
resulting from the casing removal 
must be secured as required above. 

c. Annular Space: no annular 
space that extends to the surface 
shall be left open to the drilled 
hole below. If this condition 
exists, a minimum of the top 5 
feet of annulus shall be plugged 
with cement. 

d. Testing: the first plug 
below the surface plug shall 
generally be tested by either 
tagging the plug with the working 
pipe string or pressuring to a 
minimum pump (surface) pressure of 
1,000 psig with no more than a 10 
percent drop during a 15-minute 
period (cased hole only) . If the 
integrity of any other plug is 
questioned, it must be tested in 
the same manner. Also, any cement 
plug that is the only isolating 
medium for a fresh water interval 
or a zone containing a valuable 
mineral deposit should be tested 
by tagging with the drill string. 
Tagging the first plug below the 
surface plug will not be necessary 
where water flows or valuable 
mineral deposits have not been 
encountered. 

e. Surface Plug: a cement 
plug of at least 50 feet shall be 
placed in the smallest casing that 
extends to the surface. The top 
of this plug shall be placed as 
near the eventual casing cut-off 
point as possible. 



B-7 



Conditions of Approval 



f. Mud: each interval 
between the plugs shall be filled 
with mud of sufficient density to 
exert hydrostatic pressure 
exceeding the greatest formation 
pressure encountered while 
drilling such interval. In the 
absence of other information at 
the time plugging is approved, a 
minimum mud weight of nine pounds 
per gallon shall be specified. 

g. Surface Cap: all casing 
shall be cut off at the base of 
the cellar or three feet below 
final restored ground level 
(whichever is deeper) . The casing 
shall be filled from the cement 
plug to the surface with suitable 
material (cement, sand, gravel, 
etc.) . The well bore must then be 
covered with a metal plate at 
least 1/4-inch thick, welded in 
place, or a four-inch pipe, 
extending four feet above the 
recontoured ground surface and 
embedded in cement as specified by 
the authorized officer. The well 
location and identity shall be 
permanently inscribed on the pipe 
or plate. 

76. All aquifers encountered 
during drilling that have 
potential for development as a 
water well will be evaluated for 
use by BLM as a water source well 
at the time the well is proposed 
to be plugged. Suitable wells 
would have plugging procedures 
altered to plug back to the water 
zone, at which point, the BLM 
would assume liability for the 
well and file for the appropriate 
water rights. 

77. For dry holes in visually 
sensitive areas and WSAs, the 
abandonment marker must be at 
least 4-inch diameter pipe, 
embedded in cement, buried to 
final reclaimed ground level, and 
capped with a 2 feet by 2 feet, 
steel plate, at least 1/4 inch 



thick. The plate must permanently 
inscribed with the identity 
requirements of 43 CFR 3162.6 
(b) . 

GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION 

78. Blasting or vibrating within 
1/8-mile of federally-owned or 
controlled springs and flowing 
water wells would not be allowed. 

79. Plugging of drill shot holes 
will conform to the Colorado 
Reclamation Standards Abandoned 
Drill Holes Act. Drill hole 
cuttings shall be placed back in 
the hole. 

80. No blading or other dirt work 
will be allowed without specific 
written permission from the Area 
Manager . 

81. Rehabilitation of disturbed 
areas shall be performed 
concurrent with the exploration 
operation. 

COAL EXPLORATION 

82. All drill holes must be 
plugged with cement through the 
underground minable coal beds and 
aquifers for a distance of at 
least 50 feet above and below the 
coal beds and aquifers. 

83. Holes may be plugged with a 
mud conditioner subject to the 
following: 

a. Drill holes encountering 
aquifers having artesian flow 
shall be plugged from bottom to 
top with a neat cement slurry or, 
at a minimum, be cemented across 
to a minimum of 50 feet on either 
side of the aquifer. 

b. Other drill holes not 
plugged with cement shall be 
plugged with abandonment mud 
having a 10-second API gel 



B-8 



Appendix B 

strength of at least 2 pounds per 
100 square feet and a filtrate 
volume not to exceed 13.5 cc, as 
determined by accepted procedures. 
The abandonment mud mix shall have 
a Marsh Funnel viscosity of at 
least 2 seconds per quart greater 
than that of the drilling fluid or 
at least 55 seconds Marsh Funnel 
viscosity. 

84. All drill holes shall be 
plugged at the surface with a 
minimum of five feet of cement. 

85. Holes must be plugged as soon 
after drilling as possible. 

86. Any hole proposed for 
groundwater monitoring must be 
completed and cemented to isolate 
all aquifer intervals that show 
significant head differences or 
changes in water quality to 
prevent mixing of unlike waters. 
Minable coal beds also must be 
isolated using casing and cement. 

87. All drilling fluid, foam, 
cuttings, and water _ must _ be 
contained on the drill site. 
Portable pits may be used; 
however, earth pits will be 
required if large volumes of fluid 
are encountered. Pits will be 
pumped out or allowed to dry 
completely before backfilling. 
Drill cuttings not returned to the 
hole shall be buried, hauled away, 
or scattered in a thin layer so 
they do not inhibit plant growth. 

FOREST STAND TREATMENTS 

8 8 Timber stand improvement and 
harvesting will be prohibited _ in 
riparian areas unless removing 
undesirable species or prescribing 
canopy manipulation and management 
as a means of enhancing riparian 
development. Adequate buffers 
will be designated next to 
riparian areas, considering the 



following factors: 

a. Harvest intensity 
clearcuts require a wider buffer 
than selective cuts. 

b. Slope - Steep slopes 
require wider buffers than gentle 
slopes. 

c. Aspect - North aspects 
will require narrower buffers due 
to more dense vegetative cover and 
slower runoff. 

d. Soil - Sensitive soil 
will require wider buffers than 
resilient soil. 

89. Stand treatments shall be 
designed to minimize adverse 
effects on water quality. The 
distribution of cutting units, 
intensity of cutting, and the 
cumulative effects in a watershed 
shall be considered when 
formulating stand prescriptions. 

90. The closure of new roads will 
be' considered and planned for 
during sale preparation according 
to existing policy. Skid trails 
and access roads within the sale 
will be reclaimed. 

91. Stand treatments shall be 
monitored and terminated during 
periods when soil compaction may 
occur . 

92. Timber and woodland sale areas 
with less than a 15 percent ground 
cover in the under story on 
critical deer and elk winter 
ranges will be seeded with a 
mixture of grasses, forbs and 
shrubs approved by the Area 
Manager . 



PIPELINE AND 
CONSTRUCTION 



POWER 



LINE 



93 



Construction width shall 



B-9 



Conditions of Approval 



include the existing road. The 
pipeline shall be located two to 
three feet from the edge of the 
ditch along the existing road. 
The existing road shall be on the 
working side of the trench. 

94. Right-of-ways will use areas 
adjoining or adjacent to 
previously disturbed areas 
whenever possible, rather than 
traverse undisturbed communities. 

95. The pipeline will be buried to 
provide a minimum cover of 3 6 
inches through normal terrain. 
The pipeline will be buried deep 
enough to avoid problems with 
irrigation ditches, canals, 
potential irrigation areas and 
existing pipelines, as designated 
by the authorized officer. in 
rocky areas, a minimum cover of 24 
inches will be provided. In areas 
next to or crossing access roads, 
the^ pipeline shall be buried with 
a minimum of four feet of cover in 
alluvial areas and three feet of 
cover in rocky areas. 

96. Water bars or dikes shall be 
constructed on all of the rights- 
of-way, and across the full width 
of the disturbed area, as directed 
by the authorized officer. 

97. Slopes within the disturbed 
area shall be stabilized by non- 
vegetative practices designed to 
hold the soil in place and 
minimize erosion. Vegetative 
cover shall be reestablished to 
increase infiltration and provide 
additional protection from 
erosion. 

98. When erosion is anticipated, 
sediment barriers shall be 
constructed to slow runoff, allow 
deposition of sediment, and 
prevent it from leaving the site. 
In addition, straining or 
filtration mechanisms may also 
contribute to sediment removal 



from runoff. 

99. All trees on the pipeline 
right-of-way shall be purchased 
from the Bureau of Land 
Management, White River Resource 
Area. 

100. Trees removed during pipeline 
construction shall be skidded 
back onto the right-of-way 
following seeding operations. 
Those trees not brought back onto 
the right-of-way will be cut into 
four-foot lengths down to a four- 
inch diameter and located to 
allow removal by the applicant or 
public . 

101. Unless otherwise agreed upon 
in writing, power lines shall be 
constructed according to standards 
as outlined in Suggested Practices 
for Raptor Protection on Power 
Lines, Raptor Research Foundation, 
Inc., 1981. The BLM reserves the 
right to require modifications or 
additions to all power line 
structures placed on the right-of- 
way, should they be necessary to 
ensure the safety of large 
perching birds. 

102. Poles and transmission line 
locations will be selected to 
achieve the minimum practicable 
adverse impact on visual quality. 

103. Blading or excavating to 
prepare a structure framing pad 
will not be permitted. If a 
structure cannot be framed on the 
natural ground, aerial framing or 
off-site framing will be required. 

FENCE LOCATION, DESIGN, AND 
CONSTRUCTION 

104. Fence design will conform to 
BLM Manual H 1737-1 to accommodate 
negotiation by big game and 
minimize fence damage. 
Modifications to fence design may 
be authorized on a case-by-case 



B-10 



Appendix B 



basis by the Area Manager as 
necessary to satisfy special 
fencing objectives. 

105. To minimize future trespass 
litigation, the accurate location, 
survey, and marking of external 
property boundaries should precede 
fence construction. 

106. Locate fences for easy access 
while satisfying operational 
objectives. Avoid fencing 
straight up and down steep slopes. 

107. Design fences to accommodate 
winter snow levels and drifting 
snow. Inspect fences in late 
winter or early spring to identify 
deficiencies and make necessary 
design changes. 

10 8. Design should consider the 
installation of narrow walk-though 
gates, post pass-through openings, 
or other access structures to 
improve esthetics. 

109. Use landforms to reduce 
visual impacts. Avoid bulldozer 
clearing or major soil 
disturbance. 

110. Use fences to protect natural 
wetlands, streambanks, woodlands, 
and plants. Keep fences away from 
heavy vegetation and areas of 
potential blowdown. 

111. Off-highway vehicular traffic 
during construction shall be held 
to a minimum. 



Cedar Mountain, Mowry Shale, 
Parachute Creek Member of Green 
River, Wasatch, and Brown's Park 
formations and, in the Rangely 
area, the Mesaverde Group and 
Uinta formations) shall be surface 
surveyed for paleontological 
resources if they have good, safe 
outcrops likely to produce 
scientifically-important fossils . 
Class I geologic units having 
vertical- to near-vertical 
(unsafe) slopes, soil development, 
and much vegetation shall not 
require surveys as these areas are 
unlikely to produce recoverable 
fossils . 

114. Class II geologic units shall 
be sample-surveyed for 
paleontological resources during 
any surface-disturbing activities, 
projects, or land exchanges 
greater than 100 acres. Up to 
five percent of potentially- 
disturbed Class II areas shall be 
inventoried. 

115. If any fossils are discovered 
during project operations, 
operators shall cease activity 
immediately and notify the 
authorized officer. The BLM shall 
provide the operator with a list 
of BLM-approved paleontologists. 
The company shall hire a 
paleontologist from the approved 
list. The selected paleontologist 
would be given 4 8 hours to inspect 
the site and make a decision 
regarding disposition of the 
fossils . 



112. On allotments used by wild 
horses, fences will be designed to 
have minimal impact on horse 
movement. 

PROTECTION OF ARCHAEOLOGICAL 
AND PALEONTOLOGICAL SITES 
DURING DISTURBANCE 

113. Class I geologic units (the 
Chinle, Glen Canyon, Morrison, 



116. If fossils are encountered 
during underground mining, the 
operator shall move the fossil 
material to a safe place and 
immediately notify the authorized 
officer. 

117. If any evidence of human 
skeletal remains is encountered 
during a project on BLM lands, the 
operator shall not disturb these 



B-ll 



Conditions of Approval 



remains and shall immediately 
notify the authorized officer. 
Work shall not resume until the 
authorized officer has given 
permission. Human remains shall 
not be moved, excavated, or in any 
way disturbed by the operator. 

118. A Class III (100% pedestrian) 
cultural resource inventory shall 
be completed by a qualified 
archaeologist prior to beginning 
land disturbing activities. A 
report of the inventory will be 
submitted and approved by the BLM 
with stipulations necessary to 
comply with EO 11593 and Section 
106 of the National Historic 
Preservation Act of 1966. 

119. If, during its operations, 
the operator discovers any 
cultural remains, monuments or 
sites, paleontological sites, or 
any object of antiquity subject to 
the Antiquities Act of June 8, 
1906 (34 Stat. 225; 16 U.S.C. 
sees. 431-433), the Archaeological 
Resources Protection Act of 1979 
(Public Law 96-95), NHPA, of 1966, 
Mineral Leasing Act of 192 0, or 43 
CFR, Part 3, activity shall 
immediately cease and the Area 
Manager notified. The BLM will 
then take such action as required 
under the acts and regulations 
thereunder. The operator shall 
follow the mitigation requirements 
set forth concerning protection, 
preservation, or disposition of 
any sites or material discovered. 
In cases where salvage excavation 
is necessary, the cost of 
excavation shall be borne by the 
holder, unless otherwise stated. 

WILDFIRE SUPPRESSION 

120. The use of heavy equipment 
for fire suppression will not be 
permitted except on high-risk 
project fires, when limited use is 
first approved by the Area Manager 
and continuously monitored by a 



Resource Advisor (Range 
Conservationist, Wildlife 
Biologist, Hydrologist or 
Archaeologist) . 

121. The location and construction 
of handlines will implement 
methods that result in minimal 
surface disturbance while 
effectively controlling the fire. 
Handcrews shall locate lines to 
take full advantage of existing 
land features that represent 
natural fire barriers. Whenever 
possible, handlines should follow 
the contour of the slope to 
protect the soil, provide 
sufficient residual vegetation to 
capture and retain sediment, and 
maintain site productivity. 

122. Suppression in riparian areas 
shall be by handcrew only and 
concentrate on areas of heavy 
fuels. Vehicle entry into the 
riparian area will be permitted to 
establish pumping operations and 
access water only if no bridges or 
natural stream crossings are in 
the burn area. 

123. The incident commander will 
ensure that aerial retardant is 
not dropped into any stream or 
wetland. Retardant applications 
shall be outside riparian areas 
and parallel to the stream course. 

124. Fire mop-up will include 
rehabilitation of handlines. 
Waterbars will be located to 
minimize future channeling of 
runoff and direct the runoff 
toward areas of natural vegetative 
filters. Vegetation will be 
returned to the handline to help 
prevent erosion. 

125. Emergency rehabilitation 
plans shall be prepared for fires 
requiring artificial regeneration 
to stabilize the burn area or 
fireline. The rehabilitation plan 
should be developed through the 



B-12 



Appendix B 



interdisciplinary process with the 
objective of restoring resource 
quality and productivity. 

WATER DEVELOPMENT 

126. Water developments (springs, 

reservoirs , catchments, 
wells, pipeline and water troughs) 
will conform to BLM Manual H 1741- 
2. 

127. On some allotments, proposed 
and existing water developments 
will be fenced to provide 
livestock management by 
restricting access to water and to 
reduce the cost required to fence 
some ^ allotments and eliminate 
restricted wild horse movements 
created by pasture fences. 

128. Actual work in spring and 
stream beds will be done by hand 
where possible. 

129. The source of all spring 
developments shall be fenced. 

130. Cuts, fills, and excavations 
shall be dressed and blended with 
surroundings. Pipelines will be 
buried where possible. Vegetation 
will be established on disturbed 
areas . 

131. Fence reservoirs, where 
possible to create riparian 
vegetation and wildlife habitat 
providing water to livestock 
through water gaps in the fence or 
piped to a water trough. 

LIVESTOCK GRAZING 

132. Develop grazing systems to 
keep livestock off streambanks 
when they are most vulnerable to 
damage and to coincide with the 
physiological needs of important 
riparian plant species. This COA 
conforms with Colorado Livestock 
grazing Management Guideline 
Number 3. 



133. Limit grazing intensity to a 
level that will maintain the 
desired vegetative species 
composition and vigor. This COA 
conforms with Colorado Livestock 
grazing Management Guideline 
Number 6. 

134. Consider changing livestock 
species to obtain better animal 
distribution through herding. 
This COA conforms with Colorado 
Livestock grazing Management 
Guideline Number 2 . 

13 5. Use vegetation and/or 
structures to stabilize and 
protect banks of streams or 
excavated channels against scour 
and erosion. This COA conforms 
with Colorado Livestock grazing 
Management Guideline Number 7. 

136. Regulate grazing at a proper 
rate of timing intensity that will 
maintain enough cover to protect 
the soil and maintain or improve 
the quantity and quality of 
desirable vegetation. This COA 
conforms with Colorado Livestock 
grazing Management Guideline 
Number 1. 

137. Implement soil stabilization 
practices on rangelands to help 
reduce soil erosion and prevent 
sediments, organic debris, and 
applied chemicals and fertilizer 
from entering surface and 
groundwater. The best practices 
for stabilizing soils are the 
utilization of vegetation or 
artificial soil covers to reduce 
erosion. This COA conforms with 
Colorado Livestock grazing 
Management Guideline Number 4. 

138. Locate livestock water 
developments and salting sites 
away from riparian and wetland 
areas. This COA conforms with 
Colorado Livestock grazing 
Management Guideline Number 5. 



B-13 



Conditions of Approval 



139. Fence springs, seeps, and 
water developments to protect 
water quality and riparian 
ecosystems. This COA conforms 
with Colorado Livestock grazing 
Management Guideline Number 5. 

140. Ensure rest for plant growth 
and vigor during the critical 
growing period. This COA 
conforms with Colorado Livestock 
grazing Management Guideline 
Number 1. 

141. Monitor, evaluate, and adjust 
livestock management practices to 
meet resource objectives. This 
COA conforms with Colorado 
Livestock grazing Management 
Guideline Number 8. 



PESTICIDE 
APPLICATION 



AND 



HERBICIDE 



142. Application of pesticides and 
herbicides on public lands will 
conform to BLM Manual H-9011-1 and 
9015. 

143. To prevent the entry of 
hazardous substances into surface 
waters : 

a. Chemical treatments 
within the riparian areas shall be 
applied by hand and shall be 
applied only to specific targets. 

b. Leave a 25-foot buffer 
along surface waters when 
chemicals are being applied 
through ground application with 
power equipment . 

c. For aerial application, 
leave at least a 50-foot buffer 
along live water and do not spray 
in the riparian area. 

d. Always refer to chemical 
label instructions for additional 
guidance on use near water and 
required buffer zones. 



144. To enhance effectiveness and 
prevent transport into streams, 
apply chemicals during appropriate 
weather conditions (generally calm 
and dry) and during the optimum 
time for control of the target 
pest or weed. 

PRESCRIBED BURNING 

145. Prescribed burning will be 
conducted by a certified burn 
official within the parameters of 
an approved burn plan. An 
environmental assessment will be 
prepared for each prescribed burn. 

146. Prescribed burn scheduling 
will be established by 
prioritizing resource objectives. 
Treatment priorities should be 
based on soil productivity and 
potential, desired plant community 
composition, and site preparation 
and treatment costs. 

147. To protect soil productivity, 
burning will be conducted under 
conditions when a light burn can 
accomplish stated objectives. 

a. Highly sensitive soils - 
Burn only in spring-like 
conditions when soil and duff are 
moist. Maximize retention of duff 
layer. Maintain 90 percent of 
woody debris equal to or greater 
than nine inches in diameter. 

b. Moderately sensitive 
soils - Burn only in spring-like 
conditions when soil and duff are 
moist. Maximize retention of duff 
layer. Maintain 80 percent of 
woody debris equal to or greater 
than nine inches in diameter. 
Write burning prescriptions that 
reduce disturbance and duration 
and achieve low fire intensity. 

c. Least sensitive soils - 
Write prescriptions for low and 
moderate intensity burns to 
protect most of the nutrient 



B-14 



Appendix B 

capital. Maximize retention of 
duff layer. Maintain 7 5 percent 
of woody debris equal to or 
greater than nine inches in 
diameter. 

148. Do not burn piles of slash 
within 100 feet of riparian areas. 
If riparian areas are within or 
adjacent to the prescribed burn 
unit, piles will be firelined or 
scattered prior to burning. 

149. When preparing the unit for 
burning, avoid piling 
concentrations of large logs and 
stumps; pile small material (3 to 
8 inches in diameter) . Piles 
should be burned when soil and 
duff moisture are high. 

150. Burning will be conducted 
only within prescription. The 
prescription should provide an 
ignition design and sequence that 
will result in the desired burning 
intensity. 

151. Test burns shall be conducted 
to ensure that the actual burn can 
be conducted within the prescribed 
atmospheric and site conditions 
necessary to achieve specified 
objectives. 

MECHANICAL TREATMENTS 

152. All projects affecting 
aquatic or riparian habitats would 
be reviewed and mitigation 
developed in order to reduce 
adverse impacts. A buffer strip 
along all perennial streams would 
be maintained in areas of 
vegetation manipulations. 

153. No vegetation manipulation 
would be allowed within areas of 
intensive mineral activity where 
major surface disturbance, such as 
strip mining, may occur. 

154. Vegetation manipulations 
would not be conducted on soils 



having high erosion 
susceptibility. 

155. Areas proposed for vegetation 
manipulation would not be grazed 
by livestock until understory 
vegetation becomes well 
established and is able to support 
livestock grazing. A minimum of 
two complete growing seasons of 
rest from livestock grazing would 
be required to help ensure 
desirable vegetation regains 
vigor . 

156. Vegetation manipulations 
would be irregular in shape, 
consisting of patches, strips, and 
fingers that maximize edge effect. 

157. No point in a treated area 
would be greater than 2 00 yards 
from suitable cover unless a need 
is revealed through analysis by an 
interdisciplinary team. 

158. Pinyon- juniper manipulations 
would be limited to 4 -acre blocks 
unless the distance to cover 
stipulation is followed. 

159. Adequate cover for wild 
horses would be ensured in wild 
horse areas, before initiating 
pinyon- juniper manipulation. 

160. Snags, flat- topped or open- 
limbed conifers, and trees used 
intensively by cavity nesters, 
would be protected within 
vegetation manipulations. All 
snags would be preserved within a 
1/2-mile radius of known active 
raptor nests. 

161. Manipulation of sagebrush 
would be evaluated to determine 
impacts and necessary mitigation 
to ensure protection of sagebrush- 
dependent wildlife species. In 
general, no sagebrush within a 2- 
mile radius of a sage grouse 
strutting ground would be 
manipulated where the canopy cover 



B-15 



Conditions of Approval 



is less than 40 percent. 

162. Vegetation manipulations 
would not be conducted on any 
archaeological, cultural, 
paleontological , or significant 
recreational area. 

163. Mechanical manipulations 
would be limited to slopes of 2 
percent or less . 

HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES 

164. All authorized users of 
public lands are expected to know 
and comply with regulations 
governing the storage, handling, 
application (including licensing 
of applicators) , and disposal of 
hazardous substances. 

165. Do not transport, handle, 
store, load, or dispose of any 
hazardous substance in such a 
manner as to pollute water 
supplies or waterways, or cause 
damage or injury to land, 
including humans, desirable plants 
and animals . 

166. Do not store, mix, or rinse 
hazardous substances or 
fertilizers in an area where they 
might enter state waters. 

167. When a project might involve 
the use of hazardous substances, 
the applicant shall develop a 
contingency plan for spills, 
including cleanup procedures and 
notification of the State Water 
Quality Bureau. 

PROTECTION OF WILDLIFE HABITAT 

168. Vehicular access by the 

public on important wildlife 
habitats and/or during sensitive 
functional use periods (e.g., big 
game severe winter range, critical 
summer use areas, raptor nesting 
areas, sage grouse reproductive 
habitats) would be subject to 



restrictions as directed by the 
Area Manager. Use of restricted 
road segments by authorized 
personnel (e.g., BLM personnel, 
law enforcement, permitted land 
users) may be allowed for 
administrative and operational 
purposes. Methods used to 
restrict vehicular access may 
include: installing lockable 
gates, barricades or other forms 
of deterrents, signing, or 
reclaiming and abandoning roads or 
trails no longer necessary for 
management, or other methods 
prescribed by the Area Manager. 

169. Surface disturbance and 
vegetation clearing associated 
with project construction should 
generally be located to avoid 
vegetative types in most limited 
supply, those less conducive to 
successful reclamation, or those 
representing greater site-specific 
value for wildlife, as determined 
during the NEPA process. Examples 
of these vegetative types are 
juniper stands in a predominant 
sagebrush type, sagebrush in a 
predominant woodland type, mature 
tree stands rather than younger 
growth, and woodlands with well 
developed understory rather than 
with barren understory. 

170. Woodland treatments will be 
designed and located where 
possible to replicate natural 
patterns of forest succession and 
distribution. Efforts will be 
made to minimize community 
fragmentation, including 
structural and age class 
components. In general, no point 
within an opened stand will be 
more than 200 yards from equal or 
greater intervals of cover. 

171. Snags, including dead or 
dying trees, will be retained 
within the interior of forest 
treatment areas at levels 
commensurate with stand 



B-16 



Appendix B 

composition. Leave trees will be 
designated by the Area biologist 
prior to treatment. 

MANAGEMENT OF NOXIOUS WEEDS 

172. An Integrated Weed Management 
(IWM) approach to the prevention, 
control or containment of noxious 
weeds and undesirable plant 
species will be implemented 
according to BLM Manual 9015-- 
Integrated Weed Management 
(12/2/92) . 

173. All seed planted or sowed in 
BLM weed-free zones, for any 
purpose, shall be certified by a 
qualified federal, state or county 
officer as free of noxious weed 
seed. 

174. All hay, straw, mulch or 
other vegetative material used in 
weed-free zones for site 
stability, rehabilitation or 
project facilitation shall be 
certified by a qualified federal, 
state or county officer as free of 
noxious weeds and noxious weed 
seed. Current state standards 
shall be applicable. 

175. All baled feed, pelletized 
feed and grain transported onto 
BLM weed-free zones and used to 
feed livestock shall be certified 
as free of noxious weed seed by a 
qualified federal, state or county 
officer. 

176. All contractors and land-use 
operators moving surface 
disturbing equipment into the weed 
free zones must clean their 
equipment prior to use on BLM 
lands. These requirements may be 
waived by the area manager. 

177. All pest control proposals 
wili include an environmental 
analysis developed within an 
Integrated Pest Management format. 
Selection of the preferred 



alternative shall depend upon 
environmentally sound and cost- 
effective criteria. 

178. Monitoring of land-disturbing 
activities in weed-free zones will 
use permanent photo points to 
identify noxious weed growth 
stages, degree of infestation, and 
trends. 



pesticide 
Herbicides must be 



179. Application of herbicides 
must be under field supervision of 
an EPA-certified 
applicator. 

registered by the EPA and 
application proposals must be 
approved by the BLM. 

RECLAMATION 

180. All disturbed sites shall be 
promptly reclaimed to the 
satisfaction of the Area Manger. 

181. Reclamation should be 
implemented concurrent with 
construction and site operations 
to the fullest extent possible. 
Final reclamation actions shall be 
initiated within six months of the 
termination of operations unless 
otherwise approved in writing by 
the Authorized Officer. 

182. The goal for rehabilitation 
of any disturbed area shall be the 
permanent restoration of original 
site conditions and productive 
capability. 

183. Disturbed areas shall be 
restored as nearly as possible to 
its original contour. 

184. Fill material shall be pushed 
into cut areas and up over 
backslopes. Leave no depressions 
that will trap water or form 
ponds . 

185. Distribute topsoil evenly 
over the location and prepare a 
seedbed by disking or ripping. 



B-17 



Drill seed on contour at a depth 
no greater than 1/2 inch. In 
areas that cannot be drilled, 
broadcast at double the seeding 
rate and harrow seed into the 
soil . 

186. Use seed that is certified 
and free of noxious weeds. Seed 
certification tags must be 
submitted to the Area Manager. 

187. Additional seed applications 
may be required to accommodate 
specific site conditions or if 
initial seed germination has 
failed. 

188. Seed species used in 
reseeding disturbed areas will be 
based on the seed mixes identified 



Conditions of Approval 

in table Bl and B2 . These mixes 
are based on range sites as 
determined by soils. Only native 
plant species will be used for 
reseeding of disturbed areas 
within the Blue Mountain/Moosehead 
Geographic Reference Area, 
Wilderness study Areas, and within 
designated Areas of Critical 
Environmental Concern. Native 
plant species would be strongly 
encouraged in the remainder of the 
Resource Area for reseeding 
disturbed areas that are not 
threatened by establishment of 
exotic or noxious plant species. 
Naturalized plant species will be 
allowed for reseeding on "at risk" 
and "unhealthy" rangelands and 
grazable woodlands. 

189. Leave the disturbed area in 
a condition that provides drainage 
with no additional maintenance. 



B-18 



Appendix B 



Table B-l. Standard Seed Mixes 



Seed 
Mix 

# 


Species (Variety) 


Lbs 

PLS/ 

Acre 


Range sites 


l 


Siberian wheatgrass 

(P27) 

Russian wildrye 

(Bozoisky) 

Crested wheatgrass 

(Hycrest) 

Alternates: Yellow 
sweetclover, Fourwing 
saltbush, Nutall 
saltbush, Winterfat, 
Annual Sunflower, 
Western wheatgrass 


3 
2 
3 


Alkaline Uplands, Badlands, Clayey 7 "-9", Clayey 
Salt Desert, Cold Desert Breaks, Cold Desert 
Overflow, Gravelly 7 "-9", Limey Cold Desert, Loamy 
7"-9", Loamy Cold Desert, Loamy Salt Desert, Saline 
Lowland, Salt Desert Breaks, Salt Flats, Salt 
Meadow Sands 7 "-9", Sandy 7" -9", Sandy Cold Desert, 
Sandy Salt Desert, Shale 7" -9", shale/Sands 
Complex, Shallow Loamy, Shallow Sandy, Shallow 
Slopes, Silty Salt Desert, Silty Swale, Steep 

Slopes 


2 


Western wheatgrass 
(Arriba) 

Pubescent wheatgrass 
( Luna ) 

Russian wildrye 
(Bozoisky) 
Crested wheatgrass 
(Fairway /Ephraim) 
Yellow sweetclover 
(Madrid) 

Fourwing saltbush 
(Wytana/Rincon) 

Alternates : 
Winterfat 


3 
2 
2 

2 

0.5 

2 


Alkaline Slopes, Clayey Foothills, Clayey Slopes, 
Claypan, Mountain Shale 


3 


Pubescent wheatgrass 

( Luna ) 

Western wheatgrass 

(Rosanna) 

Crested wheatgrass 

(Ephraim) 

Indian ricegrass 

(Nezpar) 

Orchardgrass (Paiute) 

Yellow sweetclover 

(Midrid) 

Alternates: Fourwing 

saltbush, 
Intermediate 
wheatgrass, Cicer 
Milkvetch 

(Monarch) 


4 
2 

1 

1 

1 
0.5 


Deep Loam, Loamy 10* -14", Loamy Breaks, Loamy 
Slopes, Rolling Loam, Valley Bench 


4 


Western wheatgrass 

(Rosanna) 

Pubescent wheatgrass 

( Luna ) 

Crested wheatgrass 

(Nordan) 

Orchardgrass (Paiute) 

Indian ricegrass 

(Nezpar) 

Fourwing saltbush 

(Wytana) 

Alternates: Alfalfa 
(Nomad or Ladak) 


2 

3 

2 

1 
1 

1 


Gravelly 10'-14', Pinyon/Juniper Woodland, Stony 
Foothills, 147 (Mountain Mahogany) 



B-19 



Pubescent wheatgrass 
( Luna ) 

Crested wheatgrass 
(Fairway) 

Western wheatgrass 
(Rosanna) 
Indian ricegrass 
(Nezpar) 

Alternates: Yellow 

sweetclover , 

Alfalfa (Nomad or 

Ladak) , 

Fourwing 

saltbush 



Basin wildrye 

(Magnar) 
Western wheatgrass 

(Rosanna) 

Pubescent wheatgrass 

(Luna) 

Orchardgrass (Paiute) 
Fourwing saltbush 

(Wytana) 



Al ternates : Cres ted 
wheatgrass, 
Cicer milkvetch 
(Monarch) , Yellow 
sweetclover 



Big bluegrass 
(Sherman) 
Intermediate 
wheatgrass (Greenar) 
Smooth brome 
(Manchar) 

Orchard grass (Latar) 
Cicer milkvetch 
(Monarch) 

Alternates: Small 
burnet, Pubescent 
wheatgrass, Mountain 
brome, Alfalfa 
(Nomad or 
Ladak) 



Conditions of Approval 

(Table B-1 Continued) 



Smooth brome 
(Manchar) 

Pubescent wheatgrass 
(Luna) 

Crested wheatgrass 
(Nordan) 

Cicer milkvetch 
(Monarch) 

Alternates: Alfalfa, 
Russian wildrye 
(Vinall) , Beardless 
wheatgrass (Whitmar) 



Sandy Bench, Sandy Foothills, Sand Hills 



Foothill Swale, Sandy Swale, Swale Meadow 



3 

1 

0.5 



Alpine Meadow, Alpine Slopes, Aspen Woodlands, 
Brushy Loam, Deep Clay Loam, Douglas- fir Woodland, 
Loamy Park, Mountain Loam, Mountain Meadows, 
Mountain Swale, Shallow Subalpine, Spruce- fir 
Woodland, Subalpine Loam 



Dry Exposure, Dry Mountain Loam, 
Rocky Loam, Stony Loam 



Limestone Hills, 



B-20 



Appendix B 





Table B-2 . 


Native Seed Mixes 


Seed 


Species (Variety) 


Lbs. 


Range Sites 


Mix 




PLS 




# 




per 
Acre 




1 


Western wheatgrass 


3 


Alkaline Slopes, Clayey Foothills, Clayey Slopes, 




(Arriba) 




Claypan, Mountain Shale 




Streambank wheatgrass 


2 






(Sodar) 








Thickspike wheatgrass 


2 






(Critana) 








Fourwing saltbush 


2 






(Wytana, Rincon) 








Alternates: 








Winterfat, shadscale, 








globemallow 






2 


Western wheatgrass 


2 


Deep Loam, Loamy 10 "-14", Loamy Breaks, Loamy 




(Rosanna) 




Slopes, Rolling Loam, Valley Bench 




Indian ricegrass 


1 






(Nezpar) 








Bluebunch wheatgrass 


2 






(Whitmar) 








Thickspike wheatgrass 


2 






(Critana) 








Green needlegrass 


1 






(Lodorm) 








Globemallow 


0.5 






Alternates: Fourwing 








saltbush, Utah 








sweetvetch, 








balsamroot 






3 


Western wheatgrass 




Gravelly 10"-14", Pinyon/ Juniper Woodland, Stony 




(Rosanna) 


2 


Foothills, 147 (Mountain Mahogany) 




Bluebunch wheatgrass 








(Secar) 


2 






Thickspike wheatgrass 








(Critana) 


2 






Indian ricegrass 








(Nezpar) 


1 






Fourwing saltbush 








(Wytana) 


1 






Utah sweetvetch 


1 






Alternates: Needle 






and thread, 








globemallow 







B-21 



Conditions of Approval 
(Table B-2 Continued) 





4 


Western wheatgrass 

(Rosanna) 

Needle and Thread 
Thickspike wheatgrass 

(Critana) 
Indian ricegrass 

(Nezpar) 
Sand dropseed 

Alternates: Fourwing 
saltbush 


2 

2 
2 

2 

1 


Sandy Bench, Sandy Foothills, Sand Hills 




5 


Basin Wildrye 

(Magnar) 
Western wheatgrass 

(Rosanna, Arriba) 
Bluebunch wheatgrass 

(Secar) 

Thickspike wheatgrass 

(Critana) 
Fourwing saltbush 

(Wytana) 

Alternatives: Utah 
sweetvetch, 

globemallow 


2 
3 

1 
2 
1 


Foothill Swale, Sandy Swale, Swale Meadow 




6 


Bluebunch wheatgrass 

(Secar) 

Slender wheatgrass 

(Primar) 

Big bluegrass 

(Sherman) 
Canby bluegrass 

(Canbar) 
Mountain brome 

(Bromar) 

Alternates: Blue 
flaxy, Rocky Mountain 
penstemonf,', 

balsamroot 


2 
2 
1 
1 

2 


Alpine Meadow, Alpine Slopes, Aspen Woodlands, 
Brushy Loam, Deep clay Loam, Douglas-fir Woodland, 
Loamy Park, Mountain Loam, Mountain Meadows, 
Mountain Swale, Shallow Subalpine, Spruce-fir 
Woodland, Subalpine Loam 




7 


Thickspike wheatgrass 
(Critana) 

Slender wheatgrass 
(Primar) 

Beardless wheatgrass 
(Whitmar) 

Streambank wheatgrass 
(Sodor) 

Canby bluegrass 
(Canbar) 


2 
2 
2 

1 

1 


Dry Exposure, Dry Mountain Loam, Limestone Hills, 
Rocky Loam, Stony Loam 



^'Appar 
2 /Bandera 



B-22 



Appendix C 



APPENDIX C 

STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES 
STANDARDS FOR PUBLIC LAND HEALTH 



STANDARD 1: Upland soils 
exhibit infiltration and 
permeability rates that are 
appropriate to soil type, climate, 
land form, and geologic processes. 
Adequate soil infiltration and 
permeability allows for the 
accumulation of soil moisture 
necessary for optimal plant growth 
and vigor, and minimizes surface 
runoff . 

Indicators : 

• Expression of rills, soil 
pedestals is minimal. 

• Evidence of 
actively- eroding gullies 
(incised channels) is 

minimal . 

• Canopy and ground cover 
are appropriate. 

• There is litter 
accumulating in place and is 
not sorted by normal 
overland water flow. 

• There is appropriate 
organic matter in soil . 

• There is diversity of 
plant species with a variety 
of root depths . 

• Upland swales have 
vegetation cover or density 
greater than that of 
adjacent uplands. 

• There are vigorous, 
desirable plants. 

STANDARD 2: Ripaiian system 
associated with both running and 
standing water, function properly 
and have the ability to recover 
from major disturbance such as 
fire, severe grazing, or 100-year 
floods. Riparian vegetation 
captures sediment, and provides 



forage, habitat and bio-diversity. 
Water quality is improved or 
maintained. Stable soils store 
and release water slowly. 

Indicators : 

• Vegetation is dominated by 
an appropriate mix of native 
or desirable introduced 
species . 

• Vigorous, desirable plants 
are present . 

• There is vegetation with 
diverse age class structure, 
appropriate vertical 
structure, and adequate 
composition, cover, and 
density . 

• Streambank vegetation is 
present and is comprised of 
species and communities that 
have root systems capable of 
withstanding high streamflow 
events . 

• Plant species present 
indicate maintenance of 
riparian moisture 
characteristics . 

• Stream is in balance with 
the water and sediment being 
supplied by the watershed ( 
e.g., no headcutting, no 
excessive erosion or 
deposition) . 

• Vegetation and free water 
indicate high water tables. 

• Vegetation colonizes point 
bars with a range of age 
classes and successicnal 
stages . 

• An active floodplain is 
present . 

• Residual floodplain 
vegetation is available to 
capture and retain sediment 



C-l 



Standards and Guidelines 



and dissipate flood 
energies . 

• Stream channels with size 
and meander pattern 
appropriate for the stream's 
position m the landscape, 
and parent materials. 

• Woody debris contributes 
to the character of the 
stream channel morphology. 

STANDARD 3: Healthy, productive 
plant and animal communities of 
native and other desirable species 
are maintained at viable 
population levels commensurate 
with the species and habitat's 
potential . Plants and animals at 
both the community and population 
level are productive, resilient, 
diverse, vigorous, and able to 
reproduce and sustain natural 
fluctuations, and ecological 
processes . 

Indicators : 

• Noxious weeds and 
undesirable species are 
minimal in the overall plant 
community . 

• Native plant and animal 
communities are spatially 
distributed across the 
landscape with a density, 
composition, and frequency 
of species suitable to 
ensure reproductive 
capability and 
sustainability . 

• Plants and animals are 
present in mixed age classes 
sufficient to sustain 
recruitment and mortality 
fluctuations . 

• Landscapes exhibit 
connectivity of habitat or 
presence of corridors to 
prevent habitat 
fragmentation. 

• Photosynthetic activity is 
evident throughout the 
growing season. 



• Diversity and density of 
plant and animal species are 
in balance with 
habitat/landscape potential 
and exhibit resilience to 
human activities. 

• Appropriate plant litter 
accumulates and is evenly 
distributed across the 
landscape . 

• Landscapes 
several plant 
that may be in 
successional 
patterns . 



composed of 

communities 

a variety of 

stages and 



STANDARD 4: Special status, 
threatened and endangered species 
(federal and state) , and other 
plants and animals officially 
designated by the BLM, and their 
habitats are maintained or 
enhanced by sustaining healthy, 
native plant and animal 
communities . 

Indicators : 

• All the indicators 
associated with the plant 
and animal communities 
standard apply. 

• There are stable and 
increasing populations of 
endemic and protected 
species in suitable habitat. 

• Suitable habitat is 
available for recovery of 
endemic and protected 
species . 

STANDARD 5: The water quality of 
all water bodies, including ground 
water where applicable, located on 
or influenced by BLM lands will 
achieve or exceed the Water 
Quality Standards established by 
the State of Colorado. Water 
Quality Standards for surface and 
ground waters include the 
designated beneficial uses, 
numeric criteria, narrative 



C-2 



Appendix C 



criteria, and an ti degradation 
requirements set forth under State 
law as found in (5 CCR 1002-8), as 
required by Section 303(c) of the 
Clean Water Act. 

Indicators : 

• Appropriate populations of 
macroinvertabrates , 
vertebrates, and algae are 
present . 



• Surface and ground waters only 
contain substances (e.g. sediment, 
scum, floating debris, odor, heavy 
metal precipitates on channel 
substrate) attributable to humans 
within the amounts, 
concentrations, or combinations 
directed by the water Quality 
Standards established by the State 
of Colorado (5 CCR 1002-8) . 



COLORADO LIVESTOCK GRAZING MANAGEMENT 

GUIDELINES 



1 . Grazing management practices 
promote plant health by providing 
for one or more of the following: 

• periodic rest or deferment 
from grazing during critical 
growth periods; 

• adequate recovery and 
regrowth periods; 

• opportunity for seed 
dissemination and seedling 
establishment . 

2 . Grazing management practices 
address the kind, numbers, and 
class of livestock, season, 
duration, distribution, frequency 
and intensity of grazing use and 
livestock health. 

3 . Grazing management practices 
maintain sufficient residual 
vegetation on both upland and 
riparian sites to protect the soil 
from wind and water erosion, to 
assist in maintaining appropriate 
soil infiltration and 
permeability, and to buffer 
temperature extremes. In riparian 
areas, vegetation 
energy, captures 
recharges ground 



dissipates 
sediment, 
water, and 



4 . Native plant species and 
natural revegetation are 
emphasized in the support of 
sustaining ecological functions 
and site integrity. 

Seeding of non-native plant 
species will be considered based 
on local goals, native seed 
availability and cost, persistence 
of non-native plants and annuals 
and noxious weeds on the site, and 
composition of non-natives in the 
seed mix. 

5. Range improvement projects are 
designed consistent with overall 
ecological functions and processes 
with minimum adverse impacts to 
other resources or uses of 
riparian/wetland and upland sites. 

6 . Grazing management will occur 
in a manner that does not 
encourage the establishment or 
spread of noxious weeds . In 
addition to mechanical, chemical, 
and biological methods of weed 
control, livestock may be used 
where feasible as a tool to 
inhibit or stop the spread of 
noxious weeds. 



contributes to stream stability. 



C-3 



7. Natural occurrences such as 
fire, drought, flooding, and 
prescribed land treatments should 
be combined with livestock 
management practices to move 
toward the sustainability of 
biological diversity across 
landscape, including 
maintenance, restoration, 
enhancement of habitat to promote 
and assist the recovery and 
conservation of threatened, 
endangered, or other special 
status species, by helping to 



the 

the 

or 



Standards and Guidelines 

provide natural vegetation 
patterns, a mosaic of successional 
stages, and vegetation corridors, 
and thus minimizing habitat 
fragmentation . 

8. Colorado Best Management 
Practices and other scientifically 
developed practices that enhance 
land and water quality should be 
used in the development of 
activity plans prepared for land 
use . 



C-4 



Appendix D 

TABLES AND FEE MINERAL EXCHANGE POLICY 

The following tables numbered 2-1 through 2~ 17, are referenced in the Manaaement 

?ollow?ng Tabfe'riT^f 10 ^ ° f Chapter , 2 ' Resource Management DeSS 
exchanges as rllltll r i discussion on the BLM's policy regarding Fee mineral 
excnanges as related to lands containing oil shale: 



Table 2-1. Fragile Watersheds 



Watershed 



Acres 



Existing Plans 



Red Wash WAP 



White Face Butte WAP 



Baking Powder WAP 



Lower Missouri Creek WAP 



Lower Wolf Creek WAP 



High Dobie WAP 



Lower Wolf Creek Exclosure WAP 



Total Existing 



Black's Gulch 



Proposed Plans 



Cottonwood Creek 



Crooked Wash 



Douglas Creek 



Evacuation Creek 



Spring Creek 



Smith Gulch 



Stinking Water 



Total Proposed 



Total Existing and Proposed 



75,520 



730 



290 



2,470 



580 



950 



370 



80,910 



20,400 



28,330 



39,500 



238, 060 



99,140 



29,770 



13,370 



40, 080 



508,570 
589,480 



D-l 



Appendix D Tables 



Table 2-2. Perennial streams not Meeting State Water Quality Standards 



Name of Stream 



White River below 
Meeker to Utah 



Wolf Creek to 
confluence with 
White River 



Red Wash to 
confluence with 
White River 



Main Douglas 
Creek to 
confluence with 
White River 



Soldier Creek to 
Douglas Creek 



Yellow Creek to 
confluence with 
White River 



East and West 
Evacuation Creek 



Pollutant 



SS, S, N 



SS, 



SS, S 



SS, S 



SS, 



SS, s 



SS, s 



Length (Miles) 



99 



10 



22 



20 



bs=suspenaea sedim ent; s=saAmtv- K ' -nu- -■ enrs g^TTTSS — ' . ' 

*' nutri«nei aotrce: Co.oraao Konpoin: issessaer.; Sepor:, 1355 



Severity 



high 



low 



medium 



high 



high 



medium 



high 



Table 2-3. Streams Suitable for Flow Surveys 



Stream 



Blue Mountain/Moosehead Geographical 
Reference Area:*' Meadow Creek 



Piceance Basin Geographical 

Reference Area: 

Black Sulphur Creek, Bitter Creek, 

Willow Creek, 

Yellow Creek 



Douglas/Cathedral Geographical 

Reference Area: 

Willow Creek, 

West Creek, Trail Canyon 



tor spec. a. scarjs :;sr. 2=coTc water ;i = .-.£ry :• = 



Criteria 



2, 3 



2, 3 



'J'See Chapter 1 for an explanation of geographic reference "areas lC """ y '-^ a - x&r - va.ues 



D-2 



Appendix D Tables 



Table 2-4. Water Depletion Guidelines 



1 

Water-Depleting Project Guideline 


Diversions 


equal to total amount diverted 


Guzzlers 


4.25 acre-feet/surface acre 


Impoundments 


4.25 acre-feet /surf ace acre 


Oil and Gas Operations 


.1 to .75 acre-feet per well drilled 
and operated (including dry holes) 


Springs and Wells 


equal to 100 percent of flow 
sustained over a given period of time 
or one year 


Waterfowl Projects 


3.44 acre-feet/habitat acre 



Table 2-5. Summary of Critical Carrying Capacities Thresholds 
to Oil Shale Development in the Piceance Basin 



Resource 


Measurement 


Thresholds 


Remarks 


Air 
Quality 


Ambient 
concentrations of 
pollutants in the 
air as determined 
by amb i en t 
monitoring and 
dispersion 
modeling. 


Class Il/category II 
increments for S02 
and particulates 
avai 1 abl e in 
Piceance Basin, and 
class 1/ category I 
increments in Flat 
Tops Wilderness and 
other designated 
class 1/ category I 
areas in the region. 
Any level 
demonstrated to have 
adverse impacts on 
Air Quality Related 
Values (AQRVs) 
including visibility 
and acid deposition 
in class I areas. 


PSD increments are usually 
exceeded before adverse impacts 
to AQRVs are demonstrated except 
for visibility. As technology 
improves or if evaluation 
methodologies change, production 
rates may increase . Actual 
impacts must be monitored and 
compared to predicted rates. 
PSD permits effectively limit to 
development but not necessarily 
leasing. Existing studies have 
estimated these limits to 
represent a cumulative shale oil 
production level for Piceance of 
300,000 to 400,000 barrels per 
day. These estimates are based 
on projected general regional 
development, specific 
technologies and project 
production rates that are 
subject to change. 



D-3 



(Table 2-5 Continued) 



Appendix D Tables 



Socio- 
economic 



Big Game 



Water 
Quality- 



Annual growth 
rate of affected 
communities . 



Habitat carrying 
capacity to 
support wintering 
mule deer on BLM 
land in the 
Piceance Basin. 



Discharge water 
quality of 
individual 
projects. 



As determined 
through 
consultations with 
local officials of 
affected 

communities . 
Guidelines to be 
used in making this 
determination: 5-15 
percent . 



The habitat needed 
to maintain 24,900 
mule deer (24,650 
AUMs) . 



Stream standards as 
prescribed by NPDES 
permitting 
regulations issued 
by the State of 
Colorado for 
specific projects. 
Allowable pollutant 
concentrations based 
on stream ratings as 
classified by the 
State of Colorado. 



Economic carrying capacity is 
relative to local tax base, 
bonding, city, federal and state 
grants in aid. Critical rate of 
annual growth beyond which 
social change is disruptive is 
between 5 and 15 percent. Local 
governments will be consulted on 
social and economic carrying 
capacities prior to leasing. 



This figure is 83 percent of 
actual wintering Piceance Basin 
herd of 30,000 animals on all 
lands, the minimum acceptable 
herd size agreed to by the BLM 
and Colorado Division of 
Wildlife. Actual location, size 
and duration of surface 
disturbance affects amount of 
leasing allowed. Stringent 
wildlife habitat mitigation may 
be imposed instead of 
prohibition of leasing depending 
on actual site-specific and 
cumulative adverse impacts to 
mule deer. Livestock grazing 
use would not be reduced by the 
BLM as a method of mitigating 
the impact of energy development 
to decrease livestock/ wildlife 
forage competition or to 
supplement forage available to 
wildlife. Mitigation necessary 
to avoid development impacts 
from exceeding this threshold 
would be the responsibility of 
the mineral lessee, not BLM. 



Colorado Department of Health- 
Water Quality Control Commission 
issues NPDES permits for 
projects, based on anticipated 
discharges. Pollutant 

discharges may not exceed water 
quality limits established in 
the Classification and Numeric 
Standards, Colorado River Basin. 
Actual cumulative water quality 
impacts must be monitored to 
assure analysis is sufficient to 
determine whether to issue 
permit. 



D-4 



Appendix D Tables 



Table 2-6. Rangeland Health Evaluation Matrix 



Indicator 


Healthy 


At Risk 


Unheal thy 


Phase 1: Soil stability and watershed function 


A-horizon 


Present and 


Present but 


Absent, or present 




distribution 


fragmented 


only in association 




unf ragmented 


distribution 


prominent plants or 






developing 


with other 
obstructions 


Pedestaling 


No pedestaling of 


Pedestals present, 


Most plants and 




plants or rocks 


but on mature 


rocks pedestaled; 






plants only; no 


roots exposed 






roots exposed 




Rills and gullies 


Absent, or with 


Small, embryonic, 


Well defined, 




blunted and muted 


and not connected 


actively expanding, 




features 


into a dendritic 


dendritic pattern 


__^^_^^^ -— 




pattern 


established 


Scouring or sheet 


No visible scouring 


Patches of bare 


Bare areas and 


erosion 


or sheet erosion 


soil or scours 


scours well ; 






developing 


developed and 
contiguous 


Sedimentation or 


No visible soil 


Soil accumulating 


Soil accumulating 


dunes 


deposition 


around plants or 


in large barren 






small obstructions 


deposits or dunes 
or behind large 
obstructions 


Phase 2 


Distribution of nutrient cycling and energy flow 


Distribution of 


Plants well 


Plant distribution 


Plants clumped, 


plants 


distributed across 


becoming fragmented 


often in 




site 




association with 
prominent 
individuals; large 
bare areas between 








clumps 


Litter distribution 


Uniform across site 


Becoming associated 


Litter largely 


and incorporation 




with prominent 
plants or other 
obstructions 


absent 


Root distribution 


Community structure 


Community structure 


Community structure 




results in rooting 


results in absence 


results in rooting 




throughout the 


of roots from 


in only one portion 




available soil 


portions of the 


of the available 




profile 


available soil 
profile 


soil profile 


Distribution of 


Photosynthetic 


Most photosynthetic 


Little or no 


photosynthesis 


activity occurs 


activity occurs 


photosynthetic 




throughout the 


during one portion 


activity on 




period suitable for 


of the period 


location during 




plant growth 


suitable for plant 


most of the period 






growth 


suitable for plant 
growth 



D-5 



(Table 2-6 Continued) 



Appendix D Tables 



Age-class 
distribution 



Plant vigor 



Germination 
macrosite 



iOurce : na"^. ir.z -.at. 



Distribution 
reflects all 
species 



Phase 3 : Recovery mechanisms 



Plants display 
normal growth form 



Microsites present 
and distributed 
across the site 



a;;ona. Re 



Seedlings and young 
plants missing 



Plants developing 
abnormal growth 
form 



Developing crusts, 
soil movement, or 
other factors 
degrading 
microsites; 
developing crusts 
are fragile 



Primarily old or 
deteriorating 
plants present 



Most plants in 
abnormal growth 
form 



Soil movement or 
crusting sufficient 
to inhibit most 
germination and 
seeding 
establishment 



Table 2-7. Projected Vegetation Disturbance and Manipulati 



Community 



Pinyon Juniper 



on 



Sagebrush Greasewood 



Mountain Shrub 



Manipulation 



Livestock 



Oil and Gas 



Coal 



Wildlife 



Woodland Sales 



Sodium 



Livestock 



Oil and Gas 



Wildlife 



Coal 



Sodium 



Livestock 



Oil and Gas 



Wildlife 



Acres 



24,270 



11,060 



30 



4,000 



2,720 



620 



78,298 



4,550 



12,000 



170 



270 



27,870 



11,910 



25,000 



D-6 



(Table 2-8 Continued) 



Appendix D Tables 



Table 2-8. Range Forage Allocation 













- .n.tsj.ex fc 


nee AT 


ea 








Grazing User 


198 


1 Grazing HS Allocation (Alternative A) 


White River RMP 






Short-Trrjn 


Long-Term 


Number 

Animal 


AUMs 
Rec/d 


Diff- 
erence 
{Surphjs+Dc 
fictt-} 






:Kumber 
Animals 


Numoer 
AUMs 


Number 
Animals 


Number 
AUMs 












Blue Mountain/Moosehead Geographic Reference Area 




1 




Livestock 


- 


9.850 


- 


12.973 


„ 


12,973 





; 




Pronghorn 


7 


3 


7 


3 


22 


9 


-6 






Deer 


1.478 


3.087 


1.918 


3.897 


2,124 


3.467 


+430 






Elk 


470 


148 


52 


156 


191 


833 


-677 






Wild Horses 


i' o 
























Total 


1 '' 532 


13,088 


1.977 


17.029 


2.337 


17,282 


-253 








Wolf Creek/Red Wash Geographic Reference Area 










Livestock 


- 


19,197 


- 


19.197 


.. 


19,197 









PrODghorn 


183 


175 


188 


183 


223 


206 


-23 






Deer 


1,007 


1.067 


1.314 


1.354 


4.300 


5,043 


-3.689 






Wild Horses 



























Elk 


38 


165 


41 


173 


431 


973 


-800 






Total 


1.228 


20,604 


1.543 


20.907 


4,954 


25,419 


-4.512 










Crooked Wash/Deep Channel Geographic Reference Area 






Livestock 


- 


12.554 


- 


14.998 


.. 


14.988 









Pronghorn 


29 


21 


29 


21 


23 


12 


- 






Deer 


8,659 


8.940 


9,493 


9,545 


4.874 


5,022 




+4.523 






Elk 


137 


380 


152 


405 


259 


742 


-337 






Wild Horses 



























Total 


8.825 


21.895 


9.674 


24.969 


5,156 


20,774 


+4.225 










Danforth Hills/Jensen Geographic Reference Area 










Livestock 


- 


10.924 


- 


10.924 


.. 


10.924 









Pronghorn 


- 


- 


- 


- 


.. 


.. 









Deer 


2,439 


4,646 


2.599 


4.813 


2266 


.. 


-43 






Elk 


866 


2,103 


885 


2.115 


950 


3,040 


-925 





D-7 



(Table 2-8 Continued) 



Appendix D Tables 



i Grazing User : 


S9S1 Grazing QS AltocaJioa (Alieroalive A) 


Wh.ie River RMP . 




Soon-Term 


Long-Term 


Number 
Animal 

6i 


AUMs 
Req'd 


Dsff- ;■;.." 

ereoee- "'. 
(Surplus+De 




I Number 
i Animals 


Number 
AUM» 


Number 
Anrmais 


Number 
AUMs 




Wild Horses 

























Total 


3.305 


17.673 


3,484 


17.852 


3.216 


18.820 


-968 




Piceancc Basin Geographic Reference Area 






Livestock 


- 


44.701 


- 


58.410 




58,410 







Deer 


28.889 


35,739 


32,435 


39,187 


19.457 


26.218 


+ 12,969 




Elk 


498 


1.296 


578 


1,450 


1.378 


4.294 


-2.844 




Wild Horses 


100 


1.500 


100 


1,500 


100 


1300 







Total 


29,487 


83.236 


33.113 


100.547 


20.935 


90.422 


+ 10.125 






Douglas/Cathedral Geographic Reference Area 








Livestock 


-- 


29.259 


_ 


30.306 




29.259 







Pronghorn 


- 


- 


- 


__ 











Deer 


2.922 


6.096 


3,767 


7.592 


9.385 


17.061 


-9.469 




Elk 


198 


653 


218 


705 


238 


971 


-266 




Wild Horses 


40 


600 


40 


600 


40 


600 







Total 


3.160 


36.608 


4.025 


39.203 


9,663 


47,891 


-9.735 





I Shows increases (1990 data) in big game animal populations 

. AUMs needed to sustain 1990 big game populations 

_' Surplus or deficit is compared with Alternative A long-term allocations 

'• S !Z S C °^f ° iViSi0D ° f WMdlife (CD ° W) I99 ' b ' e game P°^*'°* ""J^"* and P ro P° sed '■"«<« » *H horse populations 
. AUMs needed to sustain 1991 CDOW population objectives 

_ Shows CDOW 1991 big game population objectives 

™ AUMs needed to sustain 1991 CDOW population objectives 



Table 2-9. High Priority Riparian Habitats 



location 



Proper Functioning 
Condition 1 ' z/ 



of 

Riparian 



Ecological 

Condi tion/Tre-M^ 



Douglas Creek/Cathedral Geographic Reference Area 



Bear Park Creek 



East Douglas Creek 



FAR 



PFC 



4.5 



60.5 



Mid/Stable 



Late / Improving 



D-8 



Appendix D Tables 

(Table 2-9 Continued) 



Location j 


I 

Proper Functioning j 

Condi ticni' *' 


BL£t Acres" ] Ecological _ 1 
of j Condition /Trend*' j 
Riparian j 1 


Main Doualas Creek 


FAR 


360 


Mid/Improving 


Cathedral Creek 


FAR 


10.8 


Mid/Improving 


West Creek 


NON 


5 


Early/Declining 


Lake Creek 


FAR 


8.4 


Mid/Improving 


Soldier Creek 


NON 


2 .8 


Mid/Declining 


Crooked 


Wash/Deep Channel Geographic Reference Area 


Crooked Wash 


FAR 


10 


Mid-Serai /Stable 


Piceance Basin Geographic Reference Area 


Cow Creek 


NON 


14.6 


Early- 
Seral/Declining 


No Name 


NON 


3.9 


Early/Declining 


Trapper's Creek 


FAR 


5 


Mid-Serai /Improving 


West Fawn Creek 


FAR 


3 


Mid-Serai /Stable 


Black Sulphur Creek 


FAR 


8.5 


Late-Serai /Improving 


Timber Gulch 


NON 


1.4 


Mid-Serai /Improving 


Joe Bush Gulch 


NON 


0.7 


Ear ly-Seral /Stable 


Seaar Gulch 


NON 


0.7 


Ear ly-Seral /Stable 


Deer Gulch 


PFC 


1 


Late- Serai /Stable 


Yellow Creek 


FAR 


54.5 


Mid Serai /Stable 


Willow Creek 


FAR 


13.3 


Mid/Stable 


Brush Creek 


NON 


4.2 


Mid/Declining 


Clear Creek 


NON 


4 


Mid/Declining 


Rlue Mountain /Moosehead Geographic Reference Area 


Meadow Creek 


FAR 


6.5 


Mid/Stable 


Turner Creek 


FAR 


9.4 


Mid/Stable 


Bull Canyon 


FAR 


2.3 


Late/Stable 


Willow Creek 


FAR 


2.3 


Late/Stable 


Danf 


orth Hills /Jensen Geographic Reference Area 


Big Beaver Creek 


PFC 


2 


Late/Stable 


Wol 


f Creek/Red Wash Geographic Reference Area | 



D-9 



Location 

■ ■ ■ ■ ■ " ■ ■ ' 


Proper Func ti on ing \ 

Condition^ ^ :: : :: ; 


BLM .Acres' : 
Of : 
Ricarian 


Ecological ' 
Condi ti on / Trend"'' 


Divide Creek Reservoir 


PFC 


4 


Late/Stable 


White River Riparian Geographic Reference Area 


White River 


FAR 


116 


Late /Stable 


Total 




719.3 





: ' Bases or. professions 
rlassiJ icanor.. 



yjcgmer.r o: spe=:a- .s-s :ri 



lona! cor.cicicr.s ar.d/;jr ecclogica. 



Table 2 


-10. Medium Priori 


ty Riparian Habitats 




Location 


Proper Functioning 
Condition 1 ' '' 


BLM Acres of Riparian 


Ecological 
Condition /Trend?' 




Douglas Creek/Geographic Reference Area 




Gillam Draw 


NON 


5.5 


Early/Stable 


Sucker /Willow Creek 


FAR 


5.5 


Mid/Declining 


West Douglas Creek 


FAR 


2.7 


Mid/Stable 


Missouri Creek 


NON 


17.6 


Fair/Declining 


West Evacuation Creek 


FAR 


1.4 


Mid/Stable 




East Evacuation Creek 


FAR 


7 


Mid/Stable 




Foundation Creek 


FAR 


4.6 


Mid/Stable 




Bitter Creek 


FAR 


3.6 


Mid/Stable 




Spring Creek 


NON 


5.9 


Early/Stable 


Crooked Wash/Deep Channel Geographic Reference Area 


Deep Channel Creek 


FAR 


1.7 


Mid/Stable 




Tschuddi Gulch 


FAR 


6.1 


Mid /Improving 


Scenery Gulch 


NON 


0.5 


Fair /Improving 


Black's Gulch 


NON 


1.9 


Fair/Stable 


Piceance Basin Geographic Reference Area 


Piceance Creek 


FAR 


30 


Mid/ Stable 




West Branch Cow Creek 


NON 


0.5 


Mid/Declining 


Bear Creek 


NON 


3 


Early/Stable 


Fawn Creek 


FAR 


3.7 


Mid/Stable 


Yankee Gulch 


FAR 


3.9 


Mid/Stable 


Dry Fork Piceance 
Creek 


NON 


2.8 


Early/Stable 


Eureka Creek 


NON 


1.4 


Mid/Stable 


Hay Gulch 


NON 


0.7 


Early/Stable 



D-10 



Appendix D Tables 

(Table 2-10 Continued) 





Davis Gulch 


FAR 


1 


Mid/Stable 




Greasewood Gulch 


FAR 


2.4 


Late/Stable 




Little Corral 


FAR 


7.8 


Early/Stable 




Dark Canyon 


FAR 


4.8 


Early/Stable 




Cole Gulch 


FAR 


0.5 


Mid/Stable 




Hatch Gulch 


FAR 


0.5 


Mid/Stable 




Collins Gulch 


FAR 


0.7 


Mid/Stable : 




Cascade Gulch 


FAR 


0.7 


Mid/Stable 




Thirteen Mile 


FAR 


0.6 


Mid/Stable 




Fourteen Mile 


FAR 


0.4 


Late/Stable 




Ryan Gulch 


NON 


3.4 


Early/Stable 




Smizer Gulch 


NON 


2.6 


Early/Stable 




Galloway Gulch 


NON 


2.3 


Early/Stable 




Stake Spring Draw 


NON 


5.3 


Early/Stable 




Big Duck Creek 


NON 


3.1 


Early/Stable 




Black Cabin Gulch 


NON 


1 


Early/Stable 






Blue Mountain/Moosehead Geographic Reference Area 






Buckwater Draw 


FAR 


0.7 


Mid/Stable 




K Creek 


FAR 


0.8 


Mid/Stable 




Wolf Creek 


FAR 


12.9 


Unknown 




Burdette 


FAR 


1.4 


Unknown 




Bear Canyon 


FAR 


3.5 


Unknown 




Twin Wash 


FAR 


2.2 


Unknown 




Little Red Wash 


FAR 


1.4 


Unknown 




Spike Hollow 


NON 


0.9 


Unknown 




Mud Springs 


NON 


0.4 


Unknown 




Red Rock 


NON 


0.4 


Unknown 




Box Canyon 


FAR 


1.4 


Unknown 






Danforth Hills/Jensen Ge 


^graphic Reference Area 






East Fork Wilson 
:reek 


FAR 


1.5 


Mid/Stable 


• 
; < 


Vest Fork Good Spring 
:reek 


FAR 


2.4 


Mid/Stable 


! 


:ast Fork Flag Creek 


FAR 


2 


Late/Stable 




Wolf Creek/Red Wash Geographic Reference Area 















D-ll 



Tables 



Stinking Water Creek 


PFC 


7.9 


Late/Stable 


Peterson Draw 


FAR 


0.7 


Late/Stable 


Horse Draw 


FAR 


4 


Good/Stable 


Three Springs Draw 


FAR 


0.7 


Late /Improving 


Wolf Creek 


NON 


19.1 


Mid/Stable 


Red Wash 


NON 


11 


Mid /Improving 


Total 




221.9 


N/A 


* PFC = Proper rui-:;cr,ir.: C 


o.-.onrcr.; FAr. = Fun:ziana;-A 


_ SlsK; Hon = :>;ori-:or:oo_or;i_ 


Conor tion 



Table 2-11. Low Priority Riparian Habitats 



Location 



Proper Functioning 
Condition 1 ' " 



BLM Acres of Riparian 



Piceance Basin GRA 



Ecological 
Condition /Trend 



East Hunter Creek 



West Hunter Creek 



Middle Fork Stewart 



Post Gulch 



Kendall Gulch 



Main Prong 



McCarthy Gulch 



Schutte Gulch 



Story Gulch 



Dry Gulch 



NON 



FAR 



FAR 



NON 



FAR 



FAR 



NON 



NON 



NON 



NON 



3.5 



0.5 



0.3 



0.7 



0.7 



1.1 



0.5 



Unknown 



Unknown 



Unknown 



Unknown 



Unknown 



Unknown 



Unknown 



Unknown 



Unknown 



Unknown 



Wagon Road 



NON 



1.3 



Unknown 



Box Elder 



NON 



2.1 



Unknown 



Corral Gulch 



NON 



0.9 



Unknown 



Douglas Creek GRA 



Red Cedar Spring 



FAR 



Unknown 



Texas Creek 



NON 



1.1 



Unknown 



Trail Canyon 



NON 



0.9 



Unknown 



Big Spring 



NON 



1.7 



Unknown 



whiskey Creek 



FAR 



1.9 



Unknown 



Davis Creek 



FAR 



0.5 



Unknown 



Wolf Creek GRA 



Divide Creek 



NON 



0.9 



Unknown 



Box Elder 



NON 



0.7 



Unknown 



Skull Creek 



FAR 



0.5 



Unknown 



D-12 



Appendix D 



Crooked Wash GRA 


Oil Well 


NON 


0.5 


Unknown 


Price Creek 


FAR 


0. 5 


Unknown 


Total 




26.8 




_ eth - rrype* r uncionmc *. 


sncitior.; rAr. = rur^zicra -A 







Si a B "??= °r P;° fesSionai judgment of specialists VraTn'ed in "functional 'conditions 'and /or V= 





Table 2-12. 


Allotment Categories 




Category 


Number of 
Allotments 


Acres of BLM Land 


Authorized AUMs 


Improve 


54 


1,236,490 


105,120 


Custodial 


54 


67,800 


7,790 


Maintain 


36 


130,340 


13,580 


Total 


144 


1,434,630 


126,490 



D-13 



Appendix D Tables 













Table 2-13. Grazing Allotments 












Allotment 


Permit 

Nr. 


Livestock 


Period of Use 


Percent 
Public- 
Land 


Public 
Acres 


Author- 
ized Use 
(AUM) 


Minimum Rest 
Requirement 


Mgmt 
Cat. 


AMP 

Stat. 


| 




Nr. 
06001 


Name 


Nr. 


Kind 






06002 
06003 


Pine Knotl Gulch 
Wood Road Gulch 


051400 
051451 
051493 


92 
53 
29 


C 
C 

c 


05/01-09/30 
09/01-11/30 
06/01-10/30 


13 

60 
50 


1040 
1036 
1099 


60 
95 

72 


03/20-07/01 Yearly 
03/20-07/01 Yearly 
03/20-07/01 1 in 2 


M 

M 








06004 
06005 


Powcrline 
North Dry I'ork 


051403 
051403 


103 
65 
127 


c 
c 
c 


05/16-06/30 
04/16-06/30 
05/16-06/30 


46 
74 
74 


571 
12103 


72 
120 
142 


03/15-06/20 2 in 3 


M 
1 


A 










051404 


100 
26 
127 

100 


c 
c 
c 

c 


11/01-12/15 
04/1 6-06/30 
05/16-06/30 
11/01-12/15 


74 
100 
100 
100 




109 
65 
192 
148 











D-14 



Appendix D Tables 

(Table 2-13 Continued) 



1. 


























Allotment 


Permit 
Nr. 


Livestock 




Perccnl 

Public 

Land 


Public 
Acres 


Author- 
ized Use 
(AUM) 


Minimum Rest 
Requirement 


Mgmt 
Cal. 


AMP 
Stal. 


Nr. 


Name 


Nr. 


Kind 


Period of Use 


06006 


Little Hills 


051403 


157 


C 


05/01-10/30 


100 


53055 


945 


03/15-06/20 Yearly 
04/10 07/05 1 in 2 


1 








051-405 


50 


C 


04/15-04/30 


100 




26 














110 


c 


05/01-10/30 


100 




662 














5 


11 


05/01 -10/30 


100 




30 














98 


c 


05/01-10/30 


100 




590 














100 


c 


05/01-10/30 


100 




602 














145 


c 


12/01-12/31 


100 




148 












051407 


100 


c 


11/01-11/30 


100 




99 


- 












292 


c 


12/01-12/31 


100 




298 














100 


c 


01/01-01/30 


100 




99 












051408 


139 


c 


11/01- 11/30 


100 




137 














277 


c 


12/01-12/31 


100 




282 















139 


c 


01/01-01/30 


100 




137 












051409 


383 


c 


11/01-11/30 


100 




378 














840 


c 


12/01-12/31 


100 




856 














404 


c 


01/01-01/31 


100 




412 












051449 


60 


c: 


06/01-10/30 


100 




300 








J 06007 


Main Dry I'ork 


05)403 


183 | C 


07/01-10/31 


100 


9705 


740 


04/10-07/01 Yearly 


I 


A 



























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OC 


tL> 


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SO 


UJ 

uj 


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uj 


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Public 

Land 




















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a 


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1 i 




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ro 




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£ 


oc 

UJ 


W 


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o 




$ 


tO 
oc 


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Ln 


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5 = ^ 










































































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s r a 










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S. | 




















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Ln O Ln 










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o o © 










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sir 1 

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Ln 






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i — i — — 










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a a a 










3 




























UJ u> UJ 










fO 






w 
























n 












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1 
















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to = 

C CT 



GO 

o 


(1) 






£ 


r 


id 




r- 


c 
o 


Q 


O 


X 


CD 


■o 


CM 


c 


(1) 


a 




Q.^ 


< 

















a. 
< c/3 


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■"' 


J 1 TS 

•2 w 


- 


s - - s 






a: = 
E 1 

| '1 

c a- 
5 as 


03/25-06/15 1 in 2 & 
04/25-07/20 1 in 2 


04/25-07/20 1 in 2 



03/25-06/15 1 in 2 * 
04/20-07/15 1 in 2 

03/25-06/15 1 in 3 
03/25-06/15 Yearly 


fN fSI 

.£ .£ 

O O 
(n o 

CN fsi 

© o 




Author- 
ized Use 
(AUM) 


i 

1 £ S 


553 
109 
109 
955 

2451 
1086 
148 


8 K **■ 3 K* C" 

8 — «n 2 2 <* 


in 


J « 
s § 

£< 




1110 

18367 
64050 

8583 


00 

o l 
tn 




Percent 

Public 

Land 


R ^ s 


£ a a a « g 8 


§ § 1 8 S £ 


8 




K 

o 

1 

u 

a. 


05/01-06/15 

06/16-10/09 
05/01-10/31 


10/10-11/15 
06/17 10/31 

06/17-10/31 
05/01-12/15 

05/01-11/30 
05/01-11/30 

11/01-11/30 


01/01-01/31 
12/01-12/31 
12/01 12/31 
05/01-06/15 

11/01-11/30 


9 

s 


> 


-a 

s 


CJ U = ; 


-> U U u U 5J U C 


> U U U CJ rj 


'^ 


z 


Si S ^ S 


3 § s a S R o s 


9 vo <n o o 
2 •n © m in 
— — f> r-> 


1 


Permit 

Nr. 


rst 

in 

© 


051422 
051423 
051424 

051425 
051432 
051422 


051423 
051486 

051423 


GC 
T 

O 


Allotment 


c 

z 


c 


Skinner Ridge 

Reagles 
Square S 

Hatch Gulch 


Black Sulphur 






z 

„. 




06025 

06026 
06027 

06028 


OS 












1 ' - 





00 
I 

Q 



D 
I 
H 





p 








Q 






9 


















Z 






fib 








X 






5c 














2 
















































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Q 














LJ 










yj 








IO 




















© 










~ 








ar. 






— 














-< 




2 














5. 






3 


















B 


> 










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5 




R 


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c/3 








O 






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3 










































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r. 
r- 






































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n 












































































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pr 






































o 

La 








C 

la 






© 

LA 














LA 




? j 
















































4* 






■U 


















3 












NJ 






KJ 






















06 








^J 






C* 














LA 








LA 


LA 


LA 

8 


LA 


la 
O 


© 


l»j 

© 


L*J 
© 


Jo 
© 


LA 




tO 
•O 


L»J 

4- 

© 


io 

4- 


1 


g 


2 


<" 

ft 




^j 


n 


(*■} 


ft 


^ 


n 


n 


n 


ft 


n 


r^ 


ft 


Pj 


n 


n 


(•^ 


E 

c_ 






Q 
La 


n 


o 
-J 


o 
la 


£ 


IO 


c 

-o 


S 


© 


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LA 


LA 


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LA 


£ 


- 


J 
















© 


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o 




© 


















*t- 


7" 




J> 


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o 




a 


C* 








E. 




© 


Id 


o 


& 


8 


s 




fe 


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s 


6 


© 


— 







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^ 


N5 




£ 


te 


& 




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ft 






."71 








^* 


o 


A 


oc 


LA 


© 




© 


LA 


© 


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LA 




c 


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rt 




LA 


-O 


-O 






oc 


00 


CO 


8 




U> 







VJ2 
L»J 


8 


8 


Percent 

Public 

Land 












to 
























s i 










© 

La 






s 














o 




«" W 




_ 






LA 




to 


LA 


4fc 




5 


Jh 


w 


4- 






t0 






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-J 


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£ 


00 

to 


to 

tO 


IO 

to 


LA 


8 


oc 


o 


s 




































2cs 








































































PS 




o 








o © o 






© o 














© © © 




EPS 




£ 














4- UJ 














-■U L-J Ui 






































£ D 




10 








to — to 




















ro ro — 






O 








© © LA 






© LA 














© LA LA 




|. 5' 




O 








© © © 






© © 














© © © 








































i a 






































to 














— IO 














— — © 






La 








Ui O - 






LA O 














LA LA — 




5 9° 
8 








































9 








DSD 






a s 














S D H 








to 








U li) N 






ro ro 














to to to 








n 
































2 
' 3 




































CJ > 




































£ 2 




































T3 



£u "D 

ro 3 
L a. 

CO ^ > 

i.H 

I 2 

CO 



Appendix D Tables 
(Table 2-13 Continued) 







Allotment 


Permit 

Nr. 


Livestock 




Percent 

Public 

Land 


Public 
Acres 


Author- 
ized Use 
(AUM) 


Minimum Rest 
Requirement 


Mgmt 
Cat. 


AMP 
Slat. 




Nr. 


Name 


Nr. 


Kind 


Period of Use 




06036 


Grca.se wood 


051431 


22 


C 


05/20-06/30 


92 


27810 


28 


03/25-06/15 1 in 2 


I 












320 


C 


07/01-12/06 


92 




1539 










06038 


Utile Spring Creek 


051431 


250 


c 


05/01-06/15 


90 


14877 


340 


03/15-06/01 2 in 3 


I 












72 


c 


06/16-10/31 


90 




294 
















250 


c 


11/01-11/15 


90 




111 
















250 


c 


12/01-12/25 


90 




185 










06039 


Hammond Draw 


051414 


200 


c 


04/16-05/17 


100 


7098 


210 


03/15-06/01 1 in 2 


M 






06040 


Upper I'letcher Draw 


051431 


180 


c 


06/16-10/31 


62 


6250 


506 


04/20-07/15 1 in 2 


1 






0604 1 


Lower Fletcher Draw 


051414 


130 


c 


03/22-04/21 


50 


9687 


66 


03/15-06/01 2 in 3 


M 












100 


c 


04/21-05/19 


100 




95 
















130 


c 


12/01-02/20 


100 




350 










06042 


Boise Creek 


051454 


2400 


s 


04/20-05/19 


100 


8247 


474 


03/16-06/01 1 in 2 


M 












400 


s 


05/20-06/06 


100 




47 
















2500 


s 


It/25- 12/20 


100 




427 
















360 


s 


11/25-12/20 


100 




62 










06301 


Cottonwood Draw 


051442 


56 


c 


06/01-09/30 


8 


200 


18 


04/10-06/20 1 in 3 


C 






06302 


Roundtop 


051435 


215 


c 


05/16-11/07 


48 


7162 


597 


04/20-07/15 1 in 2 


I 






06303 


Mud Springs Draw 


051436 


156 


c 


06/01-10/30 


* 


549 


39 


04/10-10/15 1 in 3 


C 




























1 



D-20 



Appendix D Tables 

(Table 2-13 Continued) 

































Allotment 




Livestock 




Percent 
Public- 
Land 


Public- 
Acres 


Author- 
ized Use 
(AUM) 


Minimum Rest 
Requirement 


Mgml 
Cat. 


AMP 

Stat. 




Nr. 


Name 


Permit 

Nr. 


Nr. 


Kind 


Period of Use 




06304 


Uasin Springs 


051-437 


575 


C 


05/01-10/31 


35 


6225 


1217 


04/01-07/15 1 in 3 


I 






06305 


Marthas Hole 


051438 


4 


11 


06/15-09/15 


50 


3871 


6 


04/10-07/15 1 in 2 


M 












60 


C 


06/20-07/31 


50 




41 
















135 


C 


08/01-10/15 


50 




169 
















49 


c 


06/15-10/15 


50 




99 
















8 


II 


07/15 10/15 


50 




12 










06306 


Turner Creek 


051439 


84 


c 


05/01-10/31 


77 


3749 


391 


04/10-07/15 1 in 2 


I 






06307 


K Ranch 


051440 


300 


c 


03/01-03/15 


50 


43242 


74 


03/15 06/01 1 in 4 


1 


A 










100 


c 


03/01-04/30 


50 




100 
















300 


c 


03/16-04/30 


50 




227 

















100 


c 


03/16-04/30 


50 




76 












J . 


200 


c 


05/01-05/15 


50 




49 
















300 


c 


05/0 1 05/3 1 


50 




153 
















200 


c 


05/16-05/31 


50 




53 






' 










125 


c 


06/01-06/30 


50 




62 
















375 


c 


06/01-06/30 


50 




185 
















500 


c 


07/01-08/15 


50 




378 
















500 


c 


08/16-10/31 


50 




633 














2.5 | V 


06/01-06/30 


- 1 


106 


























1 






1 



D-21 



Appendix D Tables 
(Table 2-13 Continued) 



Allotment 


Permit 

Nr. 


Livestock 


Period of Use 


Percent 

Public 

Land 


Public 
Acres 


Author- 
ized Use 
(AUM) 


Minimum Rest 
Requirement 


Mgml 

Cat. 


AMP 
Slat. 


Nr. 


Name 


Nr. 


Kind 








215 


Y 


06/01-06/30 


50 




106 














430 


Y 


07/01-07/30 


50 




212 














430 


Y 


08/01-09/30 


50 




431 














100 


C 


11/01-11/30 


50 




49 














300 


c 


11/01-11/30 


50 




148 














100 


c 


11/01-11/30 


50 




49 














200 


c 


12/01-02/28 


50 




296 














200 


c 


12/01-02/28 


50 




296 








06308 


Artesia Allotment 


051441 


150 


s 


12/10-02/28 


100 


40099 


80 


03/15 06/01 1 in 2 


1 


A 








150 


s 


03/01-03/26 


100 




26 














150 


s 


03/27-05/30 


100 




64 














1400 


s 


11/28-02/02 


100 




617 














1400 


s 


02/03-02/29 


100 




249 














1400 


s 


03/01-03/31 


100 




285 














2000 


s 


12/11-01/20 


100 




539 














2000 


s 


01/21-02/29 


100 




526 














2000 


s 


03/01-03/10 


100 




132 














2000 


s 


03/11-03/31 


100 




276 














1200 


s 


04/05-05/20 


100 




363 









D-22 



Appendix D Tables 

(Table 2-13 Continued) 

























— ■ ,- 1 


Allotment 


Permit 

Nr. 


livestock 


Period of Use 


Percent 

Public 

Land 


Public- 
Acres 


Author- 
ised Use 
(AUM) 


Minimum Rest 
Requirement 


Mgmt 
Cat. 


AMP 
Stat. 


Nr. 


Name 


Nr. 


Kind 








2000 


S 


04/04-04/1 1 


100 




105 














2000 


S 


04/12-04/25 


100 




184 














1600 


S 


04/2605/10 


100 




158 














600 


S 


05/11-05/20 


100 




40 








063 1 2 


Raven Ridge 


05 1441 


1200 


S 


11/20-02/28 


100 


8466 


797 


03/15-06/01 1 in 2 


I 


A 


063 1 3 


Coal Oil 


051433 


700 


S 


03/01-04/15 


56 


4456 


119 


03/05 06/01 2 in 3 


C 










700 


S 


12/16 02/29 


56 




196 








063 1 4 


Raven Park 


051466 


1400 


S 


03/01 04/06 


100 


16522 


341 


03/05-06/01 2 in 3 


I 










1400 


S 


11/20-02/29 


100 




939 








063 1 6 


Spooky Mountain 


051416 


650 


s 


12/01-02/29 


96 


31082 


373 


03/15-06/01 2 in 3 


1 










650 


s 


03/01-04/30 


96 




250 














2000 


s 


11/20-12/29 


96 




505 














2000 


s 


12/30-02/29 


96 




783 














2000 


s 


03/01-05/09 


96 




884 








06320 


Red Wash 


051444 


1692 


s 


03/01 04/12 


100 


8724 


478 


03/15 06/01 Yearly 


I 










1692 


s 


01/25-02/29 


100 




401 








06321 


Rock Wall Draw 


051445 


2000 


s 


04/08-04/19 


24 


1160 


38 


03/15-06/01 Yearly 


c 










2000 


s 


12/09-12/20 


24 




38 








06322 


Skull Creek 


051484 


61 


c 


04/01-05/20 


50 


8108 


50 


04/01-06/20 2 in 3 


c 





D-23 



Appendix D Tables 
(Table 2-13 Continued) 



Allotment 


Permit 

Nr. 


Livestock 


Period of Use 


Percent 

Public 

[.and 


Public 
Acres 


Author- 
ized Use 
(AUM) 


Minimum Rest 
Requirement 


Mgmt 
Cat. 


AMP 
Slat. 


Nr. 


Name 


Nr. 


Kind 








73 


C 


10/01-02/29 


50 




182 








06323 


Wolf Creek 


051447 


800 


C 


03/01-01/06 


54 


54174 


4431 


03/15-O6/0I 1 in 2 
04/01-06/20 1 in 2 
04/20 07/15 1 in 3 


1 


A 








25 


II 


03/01 01/14 


14 




37 








06324 


Massadona 


051447 


350 


C 


03/01-04/30 


75 


8478 


526 


03/05 06/01 1 in 2 


I 


A 








650 


C 


12/01-01/03 


75 




545 












051448 


610 


S 


04/16-05/09 


100 




96 








06326 


lilk Springs 


051458 


530 


S 


10/25-11/30 


76 


19673 


98 


03/06-06/20 1 in 3 


1 










1730 


S 


11/20-01/07 


76 




424 














1700 


S 


11/20-12/15 


76 




221 














1550 


s 


03/01-04/10 


76 




318 














1550 


s 


04/11-05/25 


76 




349 














1700 


s 


03/01-04/10 


76 




348 














710 


s 


04/11-05/25 


76 




160 














1150 


s 


04/11-06/10 


76 




351 








06329 


Winter Valley Gulch 


051430 


18 


c 


05/16-10/12 


53 


1630 


47 


03/20 06/20 1 in 2 


C 




06330 


Upper Coal Creek 


051485 


2000 


s 


03/01-04/14 


81 


5355 


479 


03/15-06/01 1 in 2 


1 










2000 


s 


01/23-02/29 


81 




405 








06332 


Horse Draw 


051444 


1600 


s 


12/09-01/24 


100 


15330 


495 


03/15 06/01 1 in 2 


1 


A 



D-24 



Appendix D Tables 

(Table 2-13 Continued) 



Allotment 


Permit 
Nr. 


Livestock 




Percent 

Public 

Land 


Public 
Acres 


Author- 
ized Use 

(AUM) 


Minimum Rest 
Requirement 


Mgmt 
Cat. 




1 


Nr. 


Name 


Nr. 


Kind 


Period of Use 


AMP 
Slat. 








051447 


350 


C 


03/01-04/30 


95 




667 
















503 


c 


01/04-02/28 


95 




880 










06333 


Pinyon Ridge 


051431 


50 


C 


04/01-06^0 


100 


15511 


150 


03/05-06/01 1 in 2 


I 












75 


c 


05/01-06/30 


100 




150 
















100 


c 


04/16-06/30 


100 




250 
















75 


c 


05/01 06/30 


100 




150 










06334 


Coal Reef 


051431 


200 


c 


12/26-01/24 


100 


3837 


197 


03/15-06/01 Yearly 


C 






06335 


Hall Uraw 


051448 


1950 


s 


04/16-05/09 


100 


9070 


308 


03/05-06/01 I in 2 


C 












1350 


s 


05/10-05/23 


100 




124 
















1350 


s 


05/24-05/30 


100 




62 










06338 


Johnson -Trujillo 


051455 


1999 


s 


03/01-04/25 


100 


20930 


736 


03/20-06/10 1 in 2 


M 












1300 


s 


04/16 04/24 


100 




77 
















2212 


s 


12/07-02/29 


100 




1236 










06340 


Shavetail Gulch 


051482 


1604 


s 


03/28-05/17 


96 


7389 


516 


03/20-06/10 1 in 2 


I 












1604 


s 


11/27)2/30 


96 




344 










06341 


Banla 


051453 


22 


s 


09/2002/28 


90 


630 


21 


03/20-06/10 Yearly 


C 












22 


s 


03/01-03/20 


90 




3 










06342 


Dooglas ("reek 


051455 


2500 


s 


04/1604/25 


100 


5518 


164 


03/20-06/10 1 in 2 


M 


~~- — — - 










2500 


s 


12/01-01/08 


100 


641 

























' 













D-25 



: 

Allotment 


Permit 

Nr. 


Livestock 


Period of Use 


Percent 

Public 

Land 


Public 
Acres 


Author- 
ized Use 

(AUM) 


Minimum Rest 
Requirement 


Mgmt 
Cat. 


AMP 
Stat. 


Nr. 


Name 


Nr. 


Kind 


06343 


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051455 


3212 


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100 


17871 


1795 


03/20-06/10 1 in 2 


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06346 


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480 


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134602 


1452 


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04/01-06/25 1 in 2 
04/25 07/15 1 in 2 


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433 


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1310 














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293 














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578 














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1296 














547 


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40 




1101 














67 


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115 














480 


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1909 














433 


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386 














191 


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760 














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117 














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201 












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73 














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06349 


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051452 


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Allotment 


Permit 
Nr. 


Livestock 


Period of Use 


Percent 

Public 

Land 


Public 

Acres 


Author- 
ized Use 
(AUM) 


Minimum Rest 
Requirement 


My ml 
Cat. 


AMP 
Suit. 


Nr. 


1 Name 


Nr. 


Kind 








56 


C 


05/15-09/30 


50 




128 














130 


c 


10/01 10/30 


50 




64 












051480 


500 


c 


05/15-06/30 


50 




386 














159 


c 


07/01-09/30 


50 




240 














68 


c 


07/01-09/30 


70 




144 






— — 








56 


c 


05/15-09/30 


50 




128 












310 


c 


10/01-11/15 


50 




234 








06626 


Isolated Tract 


051481 


72 


c 


06/16 10/15 


12 


450 


35 


03/20-06/15 Yearly 


C 




06627 


Ryan Draw 


051-181 


100 


c 


05/16 06/30 


40 


1229 


60 


03/20-06/15 1 in 2 


M 




06628 


Hast Slrawbcrry 


051468 


167 


c 


05/01-05/30 


49 


1147 


81 




M 










167 


c 


11/01-11/30 


49 




81 








06629 


Devil's Hole 


051475 


22 


c 


06/15-09/14 


30 


120 


20 




C 




06630 


llyerly 


051490 


2 


c 


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100 


40 


5 




C 




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06800 


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2500 


s 


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7 


574 


163 


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M 




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051502 


400 


s 


05/01-06/15 


59 


497 


71 


03/01-06/01 Yearly 
03/01-06/01 Yearly 


C 










459 


s 


09/15-10/14 


59 




54 








06803 


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300 


s 


05/01-06/24 


10 


790 


11 


03/01-06/01 Yearly 


M 










2000 


s 


11/01-11/16 


10 




21 














800 


s 


06/20-06/26 


19 




7 









D-31 



Appendix D Tables 
(Table 2-13 Continued) 





























Allotment 


Permit 
Nr. 


Livestock 




Percent 

Public 

Land 


Public 
Acres 


Author- 
ized Vse 
(AUM) 


Minimum Rest 
Requirement 


Mgmt 
Cat. 


AMP 
Stat. 


Nr. 


Name 


Nr. 


Kind 


Period of t Ise 








800 


S 


09/1 1-09/17 


19 




7 














1098 


S 


06/25-10/31 


19 




177 








06804 


1.07 Hill 


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1000 


S 


06/01-11/25 


41 


2120 


480 


03/01-06/01 Yearly 


M 




06805 


ITieos M. 


051505 


2250 


S 


05/15-11/07 


3 


421 


79 


03/01-06/01 Yearly 


C 




06806 


Roscnlund 


051506 


800 


S 


06/16-09/30 


31 


872 


175 


03/01 -06/01 Yearly 


c 




06807 


Sheridan P & I 


051507 


300 


C 


05/01-11/15 


17 


993 


334 


03/01-06/01 Yearly 


c 




06808 


Rattlesnake Mesa 


051508 


104 


C 


06/01-12^1 


30 


1360 


220 


03/01-06/01 Yearly 


c 










200 


S 


06/01-12/31 


30 




85 








06809 


Rienau B. 


051509 


40 


C 


06/20-07/19 


100 


240 


39 


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c 










40 


C 


10/01-10/15 


100 




20 








06810 


Kritsas 


051510 


30 


C 


05/27-10/31 


99 


614 


154 


03/01-06/01 Yearly 


c 




06811 


Moore W. C. 


051511 


325 


C 


06/15-08/03 


2 


40 


11 


03/01-06/01 Yearly 


c 




06812 


Theos T. 


051512 


2600 


S 


05/01-11/25 


5 


566 


179 


03/01-06/01 Yearly 


M 




06813 


Thcos N. 


051513 


2000 


S 


06/01-07/01 


16 


1543 


65 


03/01-06/01 Yearly 


M 










2000 


S 


09/16-11/20 


16 




139 














1500 


S 


06/01-11/23 


16 




278 








06814 


Smith C. 


051514 


43 


c 


04/20-10/31 


50 


341 


138 


03/01-06/01 Yearly 


C 




06815 


Brown P. & 0. 


051515 


30 


II 


06/01-10/27 


17 


149 


25 


03/01-06/01 Yearly 


C 




06817 1 


South Fork 


051517 


400 


c 


05/15 10/25 


19 


919 


410 


03/01 06/01 Yearly 


M 





D-32 



Appendix D Tables 

(Table 2-13 Continued) 



Allotment 




livestock 


Period of Use 


Percent 

Public 

Land 


Public 
Acres 


Author- 
ized Use 
(AUM) 


Minimum Rest 
Requirement 


Mgml 
Cal. 


AMP 

Slat. 


1 


Nr. 


Name 


Permit 
Nr. 


Nr. 


Kind 




068 1 8 


J. Dodo 


051518 


100 


c: 


06/15-11/08 


9 


120 


43 


03/01-06/01 Yearly 


M 






06819 


Big Beaver 


05151'} 


<J5 


c 


06/10-09/15 


7 


232 


21 




C 












100 


Y 


06/10-09/15 


9 




29 










06820 


Oak Ridge SWA 


05 149-1 


315 


c 


05/15-07/01 


11 


1600 


55 




M 






06821 


Wilder Ci. 


051521 


250 


c 


06/01-10/31 


23 


760 


289 


03/01 06/01 Yearly 


1 






06823 


Raley R. 


051523 


30 


c 


05/01-10/26 


17 


120 


30 


03/01-06/01 Yearly 


C 






06824 


Amiek 


051524 


100 


c: 


05/15-06/30 


84 


758 


130 


03/01-06/01 Yearly 


M 












75 


c 


09/01-10/30 


84 




124 










06825 


Lagrange R. 


051525 


40 


c 


05/01-12/01 


88 


680 


249 


03/01-06/01 Yearly 


M 






06826 


Barney 


051526 


5 


c 


05/01-10/31 


23 


40 


7 


03/01-06/01 Yearly 


C 






06827 


Dorrcll C. 


051527 


50 


c 


05/01-10/31 


11 


197 


33 


03/01-06/01 Yearly 


C 






06828 


Sprod R. 


051528 


25 


c 


09/01 11/15 


39 


320 


24 


03/01-06701 Yearly 


c 






06829 


Dry Creek 


051529 


1000 


s 


05/01-11/17 


15 


920 


198 


03/01-06/01 Yearly 


c 






06830 


Jensen W. 


051530 


1400 


s 


06/01-11/01 


22 


929 


312 


03/01-06/01 Yearly 


c 






06831 


Jolley H. 


051531 


1500 


s 


05/01-07/14 


35 


2240 


259 


03/01-06/01 Yearly 


M 














1500 


s 


09/01 10/13 


35 




149 














051533 


750 


s 


05/01-07/15 


29 




109 


— ■— w • 








06832 


Mace Co* lit Al 


051532 


750 
154 


s 
c 


09/01-10/15 
05/15-10/30 


29 
12 


520 


64 
103 


03/01-06/01 Yearly 


M 







D-33 



Appendix D Tables 

(Table 2-13 Continued) 



Allotment 


Permit 

Nr. 


Livestock 


Period of Use 


Percent 

Public 

Land 


Public 
Acres 


Author- 
ized Use 

(AUM) 


Minimum Rest 
Requirement 


Mgmt 
Cat. 


AMP 
Slat. 




Nr. 


Name 


Nr. 


Kind 




06833 


Jewell lit Al 


05 1 533 


400 


S 


06/01-07/31 


77 


280 


124 


03/01-06/01 Yearly 


C 






06834 


Robinson J. 


051534 


1000 


S 


05/15-06/30 


40 


640 


124 


03/01-06/01 Yearly 


c 












1000 


S 


09/15-11/16 


40 




166 










06835 


Woodward T. 


051535 


200 


C 


05/01-10/31 


12 


1080 


145 


03/01-06/01 Yearly 


c 












1500 


S 


05/01-10/31 


12 




218 










06836 


Wilcoxson F. 


051536 


255 


S 


06/01-10/24 


11 


200 


27 


03/01-06/01 Yearly 


c 






06837 


Uig Mountain 


051537 


925 


S 


09/10-09/17 


100 


347 


49 


03/01-06/01 Yearly 


c 






06838 




051516 


93 


C 


06/01-06/15 


100 




46 
















93 


C 


10/01-10/12 


100 




37 











D-34 



Appendix D Tables 



T 


able 2-14. Rangeland Vegetation Manipulations 


Type of 
Manipulation 


Pinyon/ 
Juniper (Acres) 


Sagebrush/ 
Mountain Browse 
(Acres) 


Greasewood 

(Acres) 


Total 


Mechanical and 
Burning 


24260 


N/A 


N/A 


24260 


Chemical 


N/A 


19750 


3510 


23270 


Mechanical 


N/A 


6230 


N/A 


6230 


Prescribed 

Burning 


N/A 


76760 


N/A 


76760 


Total 


24260 


102740 


3510 


130520 



Table 2 -15. Areas of Critical Env ironmental Concern 

ACEC 



Reason for Designation 



Existing ACECs and Colorado Natural Areas 



Deer Gulch 



Lower Greasewood Creek 



South Cathedral Bluffs 



Dudley Bluffs 



Yanks Gulch /Upper 
Greasewood Creek 



Raven Ridge 



Sensitive plants and remnant 
vegetation associations (RVAs) 



Sensitive plants and RVAs 



Sensitive plants and RVAs 



T/E plants, sensitive plants, and 
RVAs 



T/E plants, sensitive plants, and 
RVAs 



Total Designated 



Candidate T/E plants, sensitive 
plants, and RVAs 



ACECs Designated upon Approval of the Record of Decision 



South Cathedral Bluffs 
Addition 



Raven Ridge - Addition 



Ryan Gulch 



White River Riparian 



Coal Oil Rim 



Sensitive plants 



Candidate T/E plants, sensitive 
plants, paleontological values, 
fragile soils 



T/E plants 



Important biologically diverse plant 
communities. Bald eagle roosts, 
federally-listed Colorado River 
squawfish below Taylor Draw Dam. 

Small aspen clones and other 
biologically diverse plant 
communities, riparian habitats 



Acres 



1810 



210 



320 



1630 



2680 



2090 



8740 



1010 



2890 



1440 



950 



3210 



D-35 



Moosehead Mountain 



Oil Spring Mountain;' 



Black's Gulch 



Coal Draw 



East Douglas Creek 



Duck Creek 



Total 



Appendix D Tables 

(Table 2-15 Continued) 



Important biologically diverse plant 
communities, riparian habitats, and 
cultural resources 



Spruce-fir and important biologically 
diverse plant communities 



Paleontological values 



Paleontological values 



Important biologically diverse plant 
communities, riparian habitat, and 
federal candidate Colorado River 
cutthroat trout habitat 



T/E plants and cultural resources 



8940 



18260 



300 



1840 



47610 



3430 



99120 





w 


1 


| . 

Section 


Subdivision 


j.ai_fcju rraci 
T -— 

Acreage 




1 N. 


91 W. 


25 


Lot 15 


4.24 








30 


Lots 5, 9, 10 


69.3 








36 


Lots 27, 52 


9.75 








36 


Lots 11, 12, 19, 31-36, 38, 39,59,60 


39.56 




1 N. 


92 W. 


4 


Lot 12 


1.18 








9 


Lots 2, 3 


19.31 








14 


NViSW 


80 








15 


NESE 


40 








16 


NViSE 


80 








17 


Lots 2, 4, NWSW 


46.54 








18 


SESW 


40 








19 


Lot 6 


5.18 








20 


Lot 6 


6.54 








21 


Lot 18 


5.69 








27 


Lots 3, 4 


8.55 








28 


Lots 2, 4 


7.53 




1 N. 


93 W. 


4 


Lot 1, SENE, NESE 


120 



D-36 



Appendix D Tables 

(Table 2-1 6A Continued) 



I Township 


Range 


Section 


Subdivision 


Acreage 






9 


Lots 1 , 8 


12.03 






34 


Lois 29, 31 


6.97 


1 N. 


94 W. 


5 


Lot 4 


1.42 


1 N. 


94 W. 


6 


Lots 10-13 


65.02 






7 


Lot 22 


6.09 






11 


NWNE 


40 






11 


Lots 19, 27, 29 


3.5 






12 


Lots 4, 9 


0.91 






14 


Lots 12, 13 


0.55 






14 


Lots 15, 23,28, 29 


0.3 






18 


Lot 1 


19.34 






23 


Lot 12 


0.57 


1 N. 


95 W. 


1 


SViSW, SWSE 


120 






2 


SESE 


40 






2 


Lot 4, SWNW, NWSW 


120 






10 


NWNW 


40 






11 


NV4NE, SENE 


120 






12 


WWW, NWSW 


120 






13 


Lot 4 


0.77 






14 


Lots 4, 5 


25.08 






23 


Lot 8 


23.46 






26 


Lot 25 


0.00+ 






27 


Lot 40 


9.72 






34 


Lot 6 


39.62 


1 N. 


104 W. 


23 


NttKWSE 


20 


2N. 


92 W. 


4 


Lots 3, 9, NWSE 


126.54 






5 


Lots 1, 8 


5.26 






8 


NWSW 


40 






29 


Lots 5. 6, 9, 18, NWSW 


95.12 ; 






31 


EVjSE 


80 



D-37 



Appendix D Tables 
(Table 2-1 6A Continued) 



Township 



Range 



2 N. 



93 W. 



2 N. 



2 N. 



93 W. 



94 W. 



2N. 



95 W. 



3 N. 



3 N. 



91 W. 



92 W. 



Section 



32 



35 



10 



10 



11 



12 



13 



13 



14 



15 



16 



17 



20 



29 



12 



35 



36 



22 



23 



24 



26 



Subdivision 



Lot 6 



SWSW 



Lots 1, 10 



Lot 1 



Lot 8 



SWNE 



Lots 8. 18, 19 



Lot 3, 7. 9. NWSW 



Lot 6 



NWSW 



SESW, wyiSE 



WVjNW 



SWSW 



EViSW 



Lot 7 



EHNW 



WViNW 



NWNE, NENW, NESW 



SWSE 



SWNE, SENW, NWSE 



NWNE, NENW 



NENE 



NESW 



NViNW 



SWSW 



SESW 



NESW 



Lots 10. 16, 21, 24 
Lois 7, 8 



Lot 4 



Acreage 



14.39 



40 



21.89 



12.92 



0.34 



40 



35.32 



123.16 



1.37 



40 



120 



80 



40 



80 



0.26 



80 



80 



120 



40 



120 



80 



40 



40 



80 



40 



40 



40 



3.8 



3.47 



D-38 



Appendix D Tables 
(Table 2-1 6A Continued) 



B Township 


Rascc 


Section 


Subdivision 


Acreage 






28 


Lot 35 


0.75 






31 


NESE 


40 






34 


Lots 7, 9 


17.17 






35 


Lots 18, 19, 22, 30 


12.32 






36 


Lots 5, 7 


3.5 


3 N. 


93 W. 


33 


Lots 5, 19.28-31. NWSW 


86.71 


3 N. 


95 W. 


3 


SESW 


40 


3N. 


95 W. 


9 


SWNW 


40 






10 


NW 


160 






17 


Lot 6 


20.17 






22 


NWSE 


40 






26 


Lots 7, 8 


40.01 






35 


SWSE 


40 






36 


SWNE, SENW, SVjSE 


160 


3 N. 


96 W. 


2 


Lot 7 


39.62 


4N. 


95 W. 


30 


Lot 6, NWNE, SENW 


117.17 


4N. 


96 W. 


24 


WWSE 


80 






26 


Lots 5, 6 


1.39 


5N. 


100 W. 


6 


SWSW 


40 






7 


NWNE, NESE 


80 






9 


NWSW 


40 


5 N. 


101 w. 


1 


Lot 5, SESE 


80.02 






17 


EViSE, NWSW 


120 






18 


SViNE, NViSE 


160 






19 


Lot 8 


39.8 






21 


NENW 


40 






31 


NENW, SESW, SESE 


120 






32 


SWSW 


40 






33 


SViNW 


80 


5 N. 


102 W. 


18 


NENE 


40 



D-39 



Appendix D Tables 

(Table 2-1 6A Continued) 





Township 


Range 


Section 


Subdivision 


i Acreage 








20 


swsw 


40 




5N. 


103 W. 


14 


NWSW 


40 




1 S. 


91 W. 


3 


SWSW 


40 




1 S. 


92 W. 


30 


SESW, SWSE 


80 








31 


SWNE, EWWVz, NWSE 


320 




1 s. 


93 W. 


17 


SESW 


40 








20 


SWSE 


40 








30 


Lot 2, SWNE, SE.VW 


158.47 








33 


SWNE 


40 




IS. 


94W. 


31 


Lots 3, 4 


73.68 




2S. 


93 W. 


1 


Lots 1, 2, 4 


64.21 








2 


Lot 1 


15.88 








4 


Lot 4 


16.55 








5 


Lots 2, 4 


32.63 








11 


EV4NE. NESE 


120 








11 


SWSE 


40 








12 


WViNW 


80 




2S. 


94 W. 


1 


Lot 1 


49.08 








6 


Lot 4 


46.47 








28 


SENE, NESE 


80 




3 S. 


93 W. 


29 


NWNW 


40 




3S. 


94 W. 


8 


SWNW 


40 




n 




14 


NESE 


40 








15 


SWSE 


40 








20 


SWNE 


40 








22 


SENE, NESE 


80 








23 


SViNW, NESW 


120 




4S. 


97 W. 


31 


NWNW 


40 




4S. 


98 W. 


22 


SWNW 


80 


_ 






30 


EWEViEVi 


80 



D-40 



Appendix D Tables 
(Table 2-1 6A Continued) 



Township Raage 



5 S. 



5 S. 



5S. 



5S. 



98 W. 



103 W. 



102 W. 



103 W. 



Section 



10 



13 



23 



21 



28 



23 



21 



28 



Subdivision 



Leu 18 



SV 2 SE 



swsw 



WWMV, NWSW 



NENE 



SENW 



SESW 



W1/2NE 



SENW 



SESW 



WHNE 



Acreage 



26.13 



80 



40 



120 



40 



40 



40 



80 



40 



40 



80 



Table 2-16B. Category I Disposal Lands - Tracts Severed by Major 





. 

Township 


Range 

■ y 


j Section 


— v^^. anu niyuLH-or way 

I 

[ Subdivision 


"I 

Approximate 

Acreage 




1 N. 


94 W. 


3 


Lots 20, 23, 28 


5 




1 N. 


95 W. 


28 


Lot 29 


1 








29 


Lots 8, 1 1 


7 








31 


Lot 1 


15 








32 


Lot 14 


3 




1 N. 


96 W. 


5 


Lots 16, 18 


2 








9 


Lots 12, 17 


5 








15 


SWNENW, SWSWNE 


5 








25 


Lots 10, 12, 26 


15 




1 N. 


97 W. 


1 


Lot 22 


1 








26 


Lot 11 


5 








27 


Lot 8 


1 








35 


Lot 23 


10 




2 N. 


94 W. 


27 


SESW 


5 















D-41 



Township 



2N. 



2 N. 



2N. 



2N. 



3 N. 



1 S. 



2S. 



2S. 



Range 



97 W. 



98 W. 



100 W. 



101 W. 



99 W. 



97 W. 



96 W. 



97 W. 



Sectiott 



34 



19 



20 



28 



29 



34 



11 



12 



12 



14 



23 



26 



33 



34 



31 



32 



11 



21 



28 



31 



32 



33 



22 



Subdivision 



Lot 1 



Lots 20. 28, 29, 31 



Lot 10 



Lots 8, 9, 21, 23 



Lots 9, 20 



Lot 3 



Lots 21, 24 



Lots 7, 8, 15, SWXW 
Lots 5, 6, 23, 30 



Lots 16,25, 27, 29,31 



Lots 8, 9, 16 



Lots 13, 14 



Lots 9, 10, 11, 27 



Lots 6, 21 



Lot 27 



Lots 5, 6 



NWSE 



Lots 4, 5 



Lots 1, 3, 4, SWSW 



WViNW 



Lots 14, 15 



Lot 12 



Lot 33 



Lots 13, 15 



EViNW 



EViSE 



SWNE, NESW 



Lot 1, SWNE, NESE 



NViSVS 



SESW 



SWNE, NWNW, EViSE 



Approximate 
Acreage 



10 

20 



10 



45 
35 



25 



25 



10 



15 



10 



60 
30 



15 



12 



15 
10 



15 
20 



20 



D-42 



Appendix D Tables 

(Table 2-16B Continued) 




Public T a r,r=i c Tai ll e T?" 16C - Cate Sory I Disposal Lands 

Public Lands with Private Permanent or Semi -Permanen t Structures 

township ■■:;::■ : Range ; 



2N. 



2N. 



3S. 



99 W. 



100 W. 



100 w. 



Lot 22 



Lot 13 



SWV4NWWNWV4SWM.WHSWV4NW4SWW 



A^jroxknate 
Acreage 



3.35 



7.85 



7J 



D-43 



Appendix D Tables 



Township 



1 N. 



1 N. 



2N. 



Table 2-16D. Category I Disposal Lands 
Range ly Expansion Tracts 



Range 



101 W. 



102 W. 



101 W. 



Section 



33 



Subdivision 



WVjNENE, nwne, nwswne, shnw 



Lot 5, SENE 



Lots 3, 4, 12, 14*, 19, 20, 30, 31, 32, 34, 
35, 36, 37 



Lots 1, 8 



NESE 



Lots 10, 23 



Lot 14 



Lots 13, 14 



Lots 1, 2, 5, 6, NENE, SHNE 



1 lhat poruon oi Lot 14 encumbered by authorizau'ons 



Lots 14, 15 



A- 602.84 related to the Rangely Water Treatment Plant 
B, C, D= 787.05 



Acreage 



80 



50.81 



193.83 



58.13 



40 



19.98 



28.82 



37.75 



222.81 



54.92 



loeadCed Lands 



Table 2-17. Category III Lands to be 
Retaxned in Federal Ownership 



BulMJanvon, Skull Creek, Willow Creek, Black Mountain, Windy Gulch, and Oi. Spnng Mountain 



Bull Canyon, Willow Creek, and Skull Creek Wilderness Areas 2 ' 



Designated ACECs: Deer Gulch, Lower Greasewood Creek, South Cathedral Bluffs, Dudley 
Bluffs, Yanks Gulch/Upper Greasewood, Raven Ridge 



Proposed Addition to Raven Ridge ACEC 



Proposed Addition to Ryan Gulch ACEC 



Acres 



White River Riparian Proposed ACEC (including Beefstake Gulch)* 



Coal Oil Rim Proposed ACEC 



Moosehead Mountain Proposed ACEC 



Oil Spring Mountain Proposed ACEC 



Black's Gulch Proposed ACEC 



81,296" 



41253 



7684 



1689 



620 



950 



3200 



10690 



17740 



800 



D-44 



Appendix D Tables 

(Table 2-17 Continued) 



. Identified Lands :.;: 


Acres 


Coal Draw Proposed ACEC 


1850 


East Douglas Creek Proposed ACEC^' 


67584 


Duck Creek Proposed ACEC 


3430 


Lower White River/Kenney Reservoir SRMA 


4890 



" Includes 1,995 acres outside the WSA boundaries that have been recommended for wilderness designation (see Wilderness Section, 
Chapter 2). 

* Assumes these WSAs would be designated by Congress as wilderness. 

* Except for those parcels specifically identified as Category I lands. 



OIL SHALE RESOURCE OWNERSHIP 
ADJUSTMENTS 

At various times during the energy 
crises of the 1970s and early 
1980s, several oil companies 
expressed an interest in 
exchanging oil shale resources 
with the BLM in order to block up 
non-federal logical mining units. 
For various reasons, none of the 
expressions or subsequent 
applications resulted in an 
exchange. One of the applications 
(Superior Oil Company) was denied 
in 1980. 

In a June 19 91 agreement reached 
between Marathon Oil Company, et 
al., and the US Department of the 
Interior, the BLM was committed to 
address land and mineral ownership 
adjustments (exchanges) in this 
document . 

The BLM Fee Exchange Policy for 
Leasable and Salable Minerals is 
one of the screens used to 
determine the public interest of 
a proposal. The policy contains 
14 elements that are to be 
considered in every fee exchange 
proposal that involves leasable 
and salable minerals. Recent 
rewording of the preamble to the 
elements has softened _ their 
application, in that now, failure 



to meet any one or more of the 
elements would not preclude an 
exchange, which would otherwise be 
found to be in the public 
interest . 

It is difficult to assess the 
impact of these policy elements on 
an area without tying them to a 
specific exchange proposal. 
However, based on past expressions 
of interest and knowledge of the 
lands that could be offered by 
interested parties, an attempt can 
be made to analyze the elements in 
order to arrive at a general 
public interest determination. 
The exchange valuation method for 
oil shale resources requires that 
only resource equivalent for 
resource equivalent proposals be 
entertained. In addition, there 
are other requirements that limit 
the proposals to the same 
geographical area. Therefore, 
only lands within and adjacent to 
the White River Resource Area 
portion of the Piceance Basin were 
considered in this analysis. 

Much of the fee mineral ownership 
in the central part of the 
Piceance Basin consists of long 
and narrow strips located in creek 
or drainage bottoms . The 
drainages in the northern part of 
the basin are structurally 



D-45 



controlled by a regional fracture 
pattern (forming a trellis 
drainage pattern) . Therefore, the 
oil shale beds below the drainages 
are believed by some authorities 
to be fractured and unsuitable for 
underground mining purposes. 
These lands were patented under 
the various homesteading laws. 
However, most have been purchased 
by major oil companies in order to 
secure water rights for potential 
oil shale development. A large 
percentage of these lands have 
been cultivated into hay meadows 
and some contain structures such 
as houses, barns and other out 
buildings. Nearly all of these 
lands are included as base 
property for the purpose of 
securing BLM grazing permits. The 
other type of fee ownership in the 
Piceance Basin resulted from the 
patenting of oil shale mining 
claims. The claims were located 
around the western and southern 
peripheral edges of the basin 
where the oil shale resource was 
structurally exposed. The quality 
of resource is inferior in these 
areas to the oil shale remaining 
in federal ownership in the 
central portion of the basin. 
This is likely one of the reasons 
why there has been the interest 
shown in exchanging oil shale 
lands . 

FEE MINERAL EXCHANGE POLICY 

The 14 policy elements used in 
determining public interest for 
Fee mineral exchanges are listed 
below, followed by a brief 
analysis of each: 

1 . The exchange would consolidate 
federal holdings into a logical 
mining unit. 

Analysis: Current ownership 
patterns would allow for the 
creation of federal logical mining 
units virtually throughout the 



Appendix D Mineral Exchanges 

central part of the basin. An 
exchange proposal could not comply 
with this element. 

2. The exchange would consolidate 
non-federal holdings into a 
logical mining unit. 

Analysis: The principle reason 
for proposing an exchange would be 
to consolidate non-federal 
holdings into logical mining 
units. Consequently, exchange 
proposals would likely meet this 
element . 

3 . ^The exchange would serve a 
national resource management or 
protection need. 

Analysis: Certain fee lands 
could be offered that contain high 
potential riparian habitat and 
habitat for Threatened and 
Endangered plant species. 
Inventories are not known to have 
been conducted on the majority of 
fee lands for other resources that 
may warrant a management or 
protection need. Some proposals 
could offer lands that contain 
resources that may meet the 
requirement for this element. 

4 . The exchange would simplify 
jurisdiction and allow federal 
land use planning efforts to be 
confined to an area in which the 
United States controls the 
mineral development. 

Analysis: Current ownership 
patterns would preclude non- 
federal commercial oil shale 
development in the central part of 
the basin. Therefore, large scale 
exchanges that would provide non- 
federal logical mining units 
within this area would have an 
opposite effect on simplifying 
jurisdiction for federal land use 
planning purposes and 
consequently, this element could 
not be met. 



D-46 



Appendix D Mineral Exchanges 



5. The exchange would reunite 
federal surface and subsurface 
estates . 

Analysis: Although there are 
split estate lands within the oil 
shale withdrawal, the acreage is 
limited and reuniting the two 
estates has not been a priority or 
an identified objective in land 
use plans. It is possible that 
small scale exchanges could meet 
this element. 

6. The exchange would eliminate 
isolated tracts and checkerboard 
patterns of federal minerals. 

Analysis: There are very few 
isolated tracts and no 
checkerboarded land patterns 
within the Piceance Basin oil 
shale withdrawal area. Therefore, 
this element could not be met. 

7 . The exchange would achieve a 
management goal without using 
appropriated funds to pay for the 
resources needed by the United 
States. 

Analysis: The only management 
goal identified within the 
affected land use plans that would 
require the expenditure of 
appropriated funds would be to 
secure public access to BLM lands. 
A proposal could meet this element 
if the lands identified for access 
easement acquisition were included 
in the application. 

8 . The exchange would meet the 
needs of state and local people. 

Analysis: Providing added 
acreage to form additional non- 
federal logical mining units would 
seem to be contrary to the 
interest of the state due to the 
loss of half of any bonus bids and 
royalties that would accrue from 
a federal leasing program. Since 



most of the fee lands are utilized 
as base property for federal 
grazing permits, it would also 
seem likely that local inhabitants 
would consider a proposal to offer 
these lands in an exchange as not 
being in their interest. However, 
the possibility of realizing 
increased employment and tax base 
may outweigh these effects. 
Because of political implications, 
it is not possible to determine 
whether this element would meet a 
public interest determination at 
this time. 

9. The non-federal lands offered 
would serve the public better in 
public ownership than the minerals 
to be transferred in the exchange. 

Analysis: Some of the non- 
federal lands contain habitat for 
Threatened and Endangered (T/E) 
plant species and high potential 
riparian habitat. An indepth 
economic and environmental 
analysis would need to be 
undertaken on specific proposals 
in order to determine whether the 
public interest is better served 
in protecting sensitive resources 
or developing adjacent mineral 
resources . 

10. The exchange would enhance 
competitive bidding for the 
federal minerals. 

Analysis: Over 349,000 acres 
of oil shale mining claims have 
already been patented in the 
Piceance Basin. Providing 
exchanges that would further 
develop additional non-federal 
logical mining units for many of 
the larger oil and gas companies 
could make future federal lease 
tracts less competitive. An 
exchange proposal would not seem 
to meet this element . 

11. The potential revenue from a 
lease or sale of the federal 



D-47 



Appendix D Mineral Exchanges 



minerals consolidated by the 
exchange would be greater than the 
potential revenue from a lease or 
sale of the minerals in federal 
ownership prior to the exchange. 



Analysis: The only way this 
element could be met is if lands 
containing associated sodium 
minerals were offered in exchange 
for lands that did not contain the 
associated minerals. However, the 
eoual value for equal value 
reouirement for fee mineral 
exchanges would have to be met ror 
all proposals. 

1 2 The exchange would be in 
keeping with the purposes, 
policies, and goals of the 
National Environmental Policy Act 
(NEPA) of 1969. 

Analysis: All formal 
exchange applications would be 
subjected to a site specific 
analysis conducted in conformance 
ith the NEPA, including the 
solicitation of public comments on 
the proposal. The development of 
a commercial scale oil shale mine 
would have a NEPA analysis 
completed prior to mine plan 
approval regardless of mineral and 
surface ownership. 

13 The exchange does not involve 
a transfer of a fee interest .in 
federal minerals for a less than 
fee interest in the non- federal 

lands . 

Analysis: Some of the exchange 
proposals in the past included 
less than 100 percent interest in 
the offered lands. The BLM policy 
is to not become a joint interest 
holder in surface or mineral 



w 



estates Proposals that included 
only partial interests or 
aareements, such as conservation 
or scenic easements would not meet 
this element. 

14 (This element deals with the 
potential exchange of coal 
resources and does not apply to 
the exchange of oil shale and 
associated minerals.) 

Analysis: There was no 
analysis undertaken for this 
element . 

Based upon the above analysis 
elements 1, 4, 6, 8(?), and 10 all 
contain provisions that would 
cause an exchange proposal to not 
meet an element. The remaining 
elements would appear o no 
present an obstacle to oil shale 
exchanges. The primary reason for 
the negative effect resulting from 
the five elements appears to £e 
related to the fact that: 1) -the 
BLM lands occur in a massive blocK 
with few isolated parcels; ^J 
there are no extraordinary 
resource values that would meet a 
priority or protection neeo 
occurring on the fee lands, and 3) 
because of the existing land 
ownership pattern, it doe s not 
appear that the res0 ^ e 
equivalent for resource equivalent 
requirement can be met. _ah 
exchange proposals would continue 
to be accepted and evaluated based 
on their relative merits o. 
meeting the public interest 
determination. 



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